Scott Stevenson

Scott Stevenson
The University of Tampa | UT · Department of Health Sciences and Human Performance

PhD

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14
Publications
12,361
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139
Citations

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Background: The purpose of this case study was to implement an evidence-based dietary approach to peaking for a bodybuilding competition and monitor its impact on body composition, muscle thickness (MT), intra-to-extra-cellular fluid shifts, subcutaneous thickness (ST), and hydration status. Secondarily, to document any adverse events of this peak...
Article
Full-text available
Bodybuilding is a competitive endeavor where a combination of muscle size, symmetry, “conditioning” (low body fat levels), and stage presentation are judged. Success in bodybuilding requires that competitors achieve their peak physique during the day of competition. To this end, competitors have been reported to employ various peaking interventions...
Article
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy appears to be beneficial in reducing the inflammatory response to exercise in older individuals. The purpose of this study is to determine if NSAID therapy is effective for alleviating exercise-induced muscle dysfunction measured by gait kinematics. In the double-blind cross-over study, 15 older...
Article
We tested the null hypothesis that creatine monohydrate loading (20 g per day for 7 days, n = 18) would not alter resistance exercise performance, isometric strength, or in vivo contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris muscle compared with loading with placebo (n = 13) in resistance-trained subjects. For the entire study group, the 1 repeti...
Article
This study examined the influence of dietary creatine (CR) supplementation upon mechanical and hypertrophic responses to a well-defined conditioning stimulus provided by electromyostimulation (EMS). Eighteen resistance-trained subjects were assigned CR or a placebo (PL) in a randomized, double-blind fashion. After CR loading (20 g x d(-1) for 7 d),...
Article
Full-text available
Aging is associated with greater susceptibility to muscle injury and soreness after exercise. Although elderly persons regularly consume nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), it is not clear that NSAIDs alleviate muscle dysfunction and/or inflammation following injurious exercise. In this double-blind crossover study, 10 men and 5 women (a...

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