Scott J Davidson

Scott J Davidson
University of Plymouth | UoP · School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences

Lecturer in Ecosystem Resilience

About

27
Publications
5,023
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279
Citations
Introduction
I am a Lecturer in Ecosystem Resilience at the University of Plymouth. My research is mostly focused around the resilience of wetland ecosystems to both climatic and land-use changes.
Education
November 2013 - May 2017
The University of Sheffield
Field of study
  • Climate change/Arctic vegetation and GHG fluxes
September 2012 - September 2013
The University of Sheffield
Field of study
  • Polar and Alpine Change
September 2007 - June 2012
University of Dundee
Field of study
  • Geography

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
Methane (CH4) emissions from Arctic tundra are an important feedback to global climate. Currently, modelling and predicting CH4 fluxes at broader scales are limited by the challenge of upscaling plot-scale measurements in spatially heterogeneous landscapes, and by uncertainties regarding key controls of CH4 emissions. In this study, CH4 and CO2 flu...
Article
Full-text available
The Alaska Arctic Vegetation Archive (AVA-AK, GIVD-ID: NA-US-014) is a free, publically available database archive of vegetation-plot data from the Arctic tundra region of northern Alaska. The archive currently contains 24 datasets with 3,026 non-overlapping plots. Of these, 74% have geolocation data with 25-m or better precision. Species cover dat...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic is currently undergoing intense changes in climate; vegetation composition and productivity are expected to respond to such changes. To understand the impacts of climate change on the function of Arctic tundra ecosystems within the global carbon cycle, it is crucial to improve the understanding of vegetation distribution and heterogeneit...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose of Review Despite covering only 3% of the land surface, peatlands represent the largest terrestrial organic carbon stock on the planet and continue to act as a carbon sink. Managing ecosystems to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and protect carbon stocks provide nature-based climate solutions that can play an important role in emission...
Article
Seismic lines are prominent linear disturbances across boreal Canada with large-scale consequences to wildlife and ecosystem function. Although seismic line restoration has been observed to improve tree growth and survival, application in peatlands has been shown to alter ecosystem functions such as hydrology and carbon storage. The most common act...
Article
Full-text available
Swamps are a highly significant wetland type in North America both in terms of areal extent and their role in terrestrial carbon cycling. These wetlands, characterized by woody vegetation cover, encompass a diverse suite of ecosystems, including broad-leaved, needle-leaved, mixedwood or shrub/thicket swamps. Uncertainties in the role of swamps in c...
Article
Full-text available
Oil and gas exploration has resulted in over 300,000 km of linear disturbances, known as seismic lines, throughout boreal peatlands across Canada. Sites are left with altered hydrologic and topographic conditions that prevent tree re-establishment. Restoration efforts have concentrated on tree recovery through mechanical mounding to re-create micro...
Article
Full-text available
Observing the environment in the vast regions of Earth through remote sensing platforms provides the tools to measure ecological dynamics. The Arctic tundra biome, one of the largest inaccessible terrestrial biomes on Earth, requires remote sensing across multiple spatial and temporal scales, from towers to satellites, particularly those equipped f...
Article
Full-text available
Northern peatlands have cooled the global climate by accumulating large quantities of soil carbon (C) over thousands of years. Maintaining the C sink function of these peatlands and their immense long‐term soil C stores is critical for achieving net‐zero global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 2050 to mitigate climate warming. One‐quarter of the w...
Preprint
Full-text available
Observing the environment in the vast inaccessible regions of Earth through remote sensing platforms provides the tools to measure ecological dynamics. The Arctic tundra biome, one of the largest inaccessible terrestrial biomes on Earth, requires remote sensing across multiple spatial and temporal scales, from towers to satellites, particularly tho...
Article
Full-text available
Vast areas of boreal peatlands are impacted by linear disturbances known as seismic lines. Tree removal and ground disturbance alter vegetation communities and are expected to change ecosystem functioning. As boreal landscapes continue to be disturbed by linear disturbances, understanding the magnitude and mechanisms of vegetation and phenology cha...
Article
The Western Boreal Plain (WBP) comprises a diverse array of wetland types; however, swamps are understudied in the WBP relative to other wetlands, despite their ubiquity. We apply an ecohydrological and GIS-based research approach at a fen-swamp complex in the WBP to characterize the ecohydrological properties of the varying wetland types and relat...
Preprint
Full-text available
Oil and gas exploration has resulted in over 300,000 km of linear disturbances known as seismic lines, throughout boreal peatlands across Canada. Sites are left with altered hydrologic and topographic conditions that prevent tree re-establishment. Restoration efforts have concentrated on tree recovery through mechanical mounding to re-create microt...
Article
Across Canada's boreal forest, disturbances from in situ oil sands mining, including well-pads, significantly impact vast areas of the landscape. The creation of well-pads requires removal of vegetation and placement of mineral fill which essentially stops any carbon (C) sequestration on the once peatland ecosystem. It is important that, once no lo...
Article
Full-text available
Alongside the steep reductions needed in fossil fuel emissions, natural climate solutions (NCS) represent readily deployable options that can contribute to Canada’s goals for emission reductions. We estimate the mitigation potential of 24 NCS related to the protection, management, and restoration of natural systems that can also deliver numerous co...
Article
Wetlands comprise a large expanse of the pre-disturbance landscape in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) and have become a focus of reclamation in recent years. An important aspect of wetland reclamation is understanding the biogeochemical functioning and carbon exchange, including methane (CH4) emissions, in the developing ecosystem. This study...
Article
Vast areas of wetlands in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta, Canada have been disturbed for mining and other resource extraction activities. In recent years, these disturbed areas have become a focus for reclamation activities. To improve our understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of constructed ecosystems, it is important that we study...
Article
Full-text available
Industrial activities for resource extraction have led to a network of seismic lines across Canada’s boreal regions where peatlands often make up over 50% of the landscape. These clearings can have a significant influence on ecosystem functioning through vegetation removal, flattening of microtopography, altering hydrological pathways, and impactin...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies have reported that the Arctic is greening; however, we lack an understanding of the detailed patterns and processes that are leading to this observed greening. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to quantify greening, which has had largely positive trends over the last few decades using low spatial resolution sate...
Article
Carbon dynamics of temperate peat swamps are a largely understudied component of wetland carbon cycling. Under a changing climate, hydrometeorological conditions may change, and understanding how peat swamps may be impacted is important. We investigated the importance of hydrogeomorphic setting on controlling soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes from a temperat...
Article
Western Boreal Canada could experience drier hydrometeorological conditions under future climatic changes and the drying of non‐permafrost peatlands can lead to higher frequency and extent of wildfires. Despite increasing pressures, our understanding of the impact of fire on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and quality across boreal pea...
Article
Full-text available
Boreal peatlands represent a globally important store of carbon, and disturbances such as wildfire can have a negative feedback to the climate. Understanding how carbon exchange and greenhouse gas (GHG) dynamics are impacted after a wildfire is important, especially as boreal peatlands may be vulnerable to changes in wildfire regime under a rapidly...
Article
Full-text available
Boreal peatlands represent a globally important store of carbon, and disturbances such as wildfire can have a negative feedback to the climate. Understanding how carbon exchange and greenhouse gas (GHG) dynamics are impacted after a wildfire is important, especially as boreal peatlands may be vulnerable to changes in wildfire regime under a rapidly...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic tundra ecosystems are a major source of methane (CH 4), the variability of which is affected by local environmental and climatic factors, such as water table depth, microtopography, and the spatial heterogeneity of the vegetation communities present. There is a disconnect between the measurement scales for CH 4 fluxes, which can be measured...
Chapter
This chapter brings together recent research, ideas, and hypotheses surrounding the magnitude, dynamics, and control of C flux from plants to their mycorrhizal fungal partners. It addresses three central questions: (1) How does the physiology and magnitude of plant-to-fungus C flow depend on mycorrhizal functional group? (2) How does C availability...

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