Scott Cory

Scott Cory
Wake Forest University | WFU · Department of Biology

About

4
Publications
406
Reads
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15
Citations
Citations since 2016
4 Research Items
15 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220123456
20162017201820192020202120220123456
20162017201820192020202120220123456
20162017201820192020202120220123456
Additional affiliations
August 2015 - present
Wake Forest University
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2015 - present
Wake Forest University
Position
  • Research Assistant
August 2013 - August 2015
Appalachian State University
Position
  • Master's Student

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
Premise of the study: The first-year tree seedling (FYS) life stage may be a critical demographic bottleneck in semi-arid, seasonally dry ecosystems such as savannas. Given the highly variable water availability and potentially strong FYS-grass competition for water here, FYS water-use strategies may play a crucial role in FYS establishment and, u...
Article
Full-text available
Seedling establishment is a critical life history stage for savanna tree recruitment due to variability in resource availability. While tree–grass competition for water is recognized as an important driver of tree seedling mortality, the importance of sunlight exposure on tree seedling performance has received little attention in savanna ecosystems...
Article
Full-text available
Fog, dew, and cloud‐borne mist are sources of water to vegetation in many ecosystems. The importance of fog as a water source has been documented well beyond ecosystems where plants experience fog for extensive periods over the course of the day (e.g. cloud forests); however relatively little is known regarding the roles of fog and foliar water upt...
Article
Fraser fir (Abies fraseri) trees are endemic to locations above 1500 m in the southern Appalachian Mountains, and are also grown commercially for Christmas trees well below their native range (down to 600 m). To evaluate how phenology and growth of this species will respond to climate drivers associated with warming, we assessed the timing of bud-b...

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