Scott Bremer

Scott Bremer
University of Bergen | UiB · Centre for the Study of the Sciences and the Humanities

About

55
Publications
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
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Climate services’ main function has been to provide technical scientific evidence for decision-making in formal institutions. This article makes a case for recognising the diverse functions and meanings of climate services across the spectrum of institutions constituting climate governance. The article reports on research that identified climate se...
Chapter
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Through the efforts shared in this chapter, we embrace the hypothesis that local representations of our changing climate offer a key angle for facing climate change. We describe the coconstruction processes of climate services in five sites across Europe: Bergen (Norway), Brest, Kerourien (France), Dordrecht (the Netherlands), Gulf of Morbihan (Fra...
Article
Full-text available
Institutions have a central role in climate change governance. But while there is a flourishing literature on institutions' formal rules, processes, and organizational forms, scholars lament a relative lack of attention to institutions' informal side; their cultures. It is important to study institutions' cultures because it is through culture that...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the implications of assessing tacit knowledges of climatic change in extended peer communities, as applied in two European research projects on climate action. Post-normal science (PNS) proposes the extension of the peer community to co-produce better quality knowledge for decision-making on issues like climate change, where fac...
Technical Report
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Rooted in the main CoCLiServ purpose -community dialogue with climate services in order for them to be more meaningful in a place- the modes of representation are rooted in the 5 CoCliServ sites. From the very beginning of the CoCliServ project to its end in June 2021, the partners saw the progressive stabilization of the 3 main modes of representa...
Chapter
Full-text available
The changing climate is disrupting freshwater infrastructures and this affects food security. Dominant technocratic systems of knowledge and practice supporting water infrastructures are being undermined by rapid changes, which introduce new uncertainties and contest old securities. Novel ways of mobilising knowledge and practice for water infrastr...
Article
Full-text available
Climate services, and research on climate services, have mutually developed over the past 20 years, with quality assessment a central issue for orienting both practitioners and researchers. However, quality assessment is becoming more complex as the field evolves, the range and types of climate services expands, and there is an increasing appeal to...
Technical Report
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The purpose of this document is • To provide an overview over the results of Work Package 1, Narratives of change; • To critically discuss the role of narratives in the production of place-based climate services for action; • To document the lessons learned from the five case-studies; • To inform the consortium and the respective site organizers fr...
Technical Report
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We conducted 5 locally-based Arts and Sciences processes, working closely with local stakeholders, artists, scientists and inhabitants in order to propose for each site a conjoint art–science analysis through shared engagement in the interpretation and representations of the various steps conducted within WPs 1, 2 and 3. We present here the theoret...
Article
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The sudden and devastating crisis of the 2020 global pandemic put risk management front and center globally. Many analysts have already highlighted both the commonalities with, and interactions between, the COVID pandemic and climate change. They have also expressed the hope that what we learn about managing risks during the pandemic can help us ma...
Technical Report
Full-text available
We developed, tested and refined a novel incremental participatory scenario approach. This method allows for the development of normative scenarios, pathways that lead to desirable futures, with local communities, through a non-linear approach. Developments in the real world rarely follow straightforward linear paths. The approach inventories ‘hing...
Article
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Climate change is dramatically shifting the way cities interpret and live with their local climate. This paper analyses how climate change is emerging as a matter of concern in the public spheres of Bergen, and interprets how this concern is effecting Bergen’s identity, with implications for the city’s climate risk governance. Historically, Bergen...
Technical Report
Full-text available
We conducted case studies using a novel incremental scenario approach. With local actors, we co-developed visions of desirable futures, normative scenarios that might lead towards those futures, and inventoried ‘hinge points’: critical moments in time where things might lead to a better or worse future. To bridge the latter, specific information or...
Article
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In this introduction, we situate the topic of this Special Issue on ‘narratives of change’ in the scholarly literature about how we inform climate risk governance, including through climate services. We argue that many places experience a persistent mismatch between predominantly science-based and technical framings of climatic risk, and the place-...
Article
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Cities face increasing risks due to climate change, and many cities are actively working towards increasing their climate resilience. Climate change-induced risks and interventions to reduce these risks do not only impact urban risk management systems and infrastructures, but also people’s daily lives. In order to build public support for climate a...
Technical Report
Full-text available
How can scientific climate knowledge be transformed into locally meaningful knowledge? CoCliServ explores new ways in climate communication and shifts the focus on narratives in order to co-develop new forms of climate services for action. Narratives of change provide local knowledge, they facilitate decision-making, and they help identifying infor...
Technical Report
Full-text available
We explored different issues and trends at play in the case study areas that might be relevant for designing local scenarios. Particularly, we examined both climate-related and non-climate related aspects, and aspects that the local community has considerable influence on as well as those that are largely beyond their control. These different aspec...
Article
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Increasing numbers of scholars and practitioners appeal to procedural theories of ‘co-production’ as they work to transform climate science into climate services. Most work in this direction theorises co-production as an ‘iterative and interactive’ process between climate service providers and users, with success measured mainly in terms of the use...
Article
Citizen science is put forward as a method for extending science to include communities in learning about, and adapting to, climate variability and change in the places they live. But it is difficult to find evidence of how citizen science influences climate adaptation governance. The citizen science field lacks the assessment frameworks and empiri...
Article
Full-text available
This study analyzes the trends of extreme rainfall indices over northeast Bangladesh for the period of 1984 to 2016 for the pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons. The research was framed as part of a project co-producing knowledge of climate variability and impacts through collaboration between scientific and local communities in northeast Bangladesh, wh...
Article
Meeting of the Norwegian Centre for Climate Services; Geilo, Norway, 25–26 October 2017
Article
Concepts of knowledge “co-production” are increasingly encouraged in climate research, including as an extended mode of climate science inquiry. So-called “post-normal” science offers opportunities to advance this branch of co-production research with theory and methods. However, the literature lacks material of how to “do” climate knowledge co-pro...
Article
Notions of ‘co-production’ are growing in popularity in social science and humanities research on climate change, although there is some ambiguity about the meanings of the term and how it is being used. It is time to critically and reflexively take stock of this expanding area of scholarship. A comprehensive review of over 130 scientific publicati...
Article
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Climate change adaptation has increasingly come to be conceptualized as a place-based social process, in large part mediated by the local cultural context. The specificity of adaptation has called for partnerships between scientific and local communities to “co-produce” knowledge of climate variability (weather) and longer-term climate change. Howe...
Article
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Our representations of climate are changing, and with them the ways we claim to know our local climates, and live according to them. Amidst this destabilising change in natural and social orders, scientific representations of climate are emerging as dominant. In this perspective piece I start from post-normal science and offer two arguments against...
Article
This paper presents some results from a critical review of how well aquaculture standards fulfil their intentions to promote sustainable aquaculture. The focus was on revealing possible weaknesses in the ethical frameworks of the investigated documents, particularly with regard to less powerful stakeholders in aquaculture production and trade. The...
Article
Full-text available
There are numerous challenges to mobilising high quality knowledge in support of climate adaptation. Urgent adaptive action often has to be taken on the basis of imperfect information, with the risk of maladaptive consequences. These issues of knowledge quality can be particularly acute in vulnerable developing countries like Bangladesh, where ther...
Chapter
The evaluation of integrated coastal management (ICM) has been a central concern for ICM scholars and practitioners alike since the inception of the field, and has given rise to a sophisticated literature. This chapter begins by critically reviewing this literature and arguing that ICM evaluation is limited by a bounded rationality anchored in its...
Article
Arguably the dominant discourse around sustainability today is defined within the cultural frame of modernity, in terms of a grand techno-scientific narrative. Within this narrative some scholars have observed the emergence of alternative modes of science for sustainability, including 'sustainability science', which have a central emphasis on 'plac...
Conference Paper
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This paper presents the lessons learnt by the climate scientists within an interdisciplinary research project called 'TRACKS': Transforming climate knowledge with and for society. The project uses the climate narratives of local people in northeast Bangladesh as a basis for mobilizing high quality climate knowledge for adaptation. To ensure this hi...
Article
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The rapid growth of the aquaculture sector over the past forty years can be closely linked to advances in science and technology. Some innovations in biotechnology have proven more controversial than others, and none more so than proposals for transgenic fish. Such innovations introduce concerns for the responsible governance of research and innova...
Article
The field of integrated coastal management (ICM) represents a rich literature on the science–policy interface. While initially a project in science-based management, the evolution of ICM over the past 40 years has seen some scholars and practitioners promoting a more participatory science–policy interface, with ‘post-normal science’ put forward as...
Article
Integrated Coastal Management has seen an on-going debate on the best way of integrating knowledge with political decision-making across the so-called ‘science-policy interface’. This paper engages with this debate by presenting an empirical study into practice at the science-policy interface supporting coastal management in New Zealand. The resear...
Article
From its inception, integrated coastal zone management (ICZM) has sought to mobilise the best available knowledge in support of collective decision-making, and to this end promoted integration across the 'science-policy interface.' As ICZM has become described in terms of coastal governance, some authors have sought to democratise the science-polic...
Article
Coastal management has long promoted the mobilisation of knowledge in support of decision-making across a 'science-policy interface'. As coastal management has evolved, the science-policy interface has been increasingly represented as a complex political setting. The interface has become the focus of a vast and confusing literature, from which have...
Article
Integrated coastal management (ICM) has long sought to create political settings within which coastal communities can arrive at collective decisions, and support these decisions with the best quality knowledge available. Traditionally this has been through the integration of natural and social science with the political processes of decision-making...
Article
Full-text available
An increasing tendency to classify environmental issues as 'wicked' has seen a wavering confidence in models of 'resource management' in favour of models of 'environmental governance'. This has come with an attendant shift in epistemological perspectives for the mobilisation of knowledge in support of society's collective deliberation and decision-...
Article
Scientists working in the biosciences are increasingly required to consider the ethical issues of their research, for example due to government oversight and international research council funding requirements. The translation of ethics into practical processes is an ongoing area of research and several tools have been developed to help scientists...
Chapter
Full-text available
Once a luxury food, shrimp today is both cheap and easily accessible for Europeans, owing largely to the rapid expansion of shrimp aquaculture in Asia, including Bangladesh. But, the economic benefits offered by this global shrimp trade are arguably accompanied by significant social and environmental costs in the producing countries, leading some g...
Chapter
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In this paper the authors present the concepts of and describe the method used in field work connected to the development of an ‘Ethical Aquaculture Food Index’ (EAFI), as part of the EC-funded project, Sustaining Ethical Aquaculture Trade (SEAT). This project looks at the trade of aquaculture products from Asia to Europe, with a focus on four Asia...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report looks at some of the integrated computer-based modelling tools available for use by regional level government in New Zealand. These types of modelling tools have the scope to assist end-users by providing the adaptive capacity essential to accelerate the transition toward sustainability. An assessment of eight different modelling tools...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Several computer-based simulation modelling tools are available to New Zealand's Regional Authorities for strategic policy research and management. Selecting effective modelling tools is often a daunting task for Councils and other end-users. New Zealand Centre for Ecological Economics (NZCEE), Landcare Research (LCR) and Market Economics Ltd (MEL)...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
The changing climate is disrupting fresh water infrastructures. Dominant technocratic systems of knowledge and practice supporting water infrastructures in Europe are being undermined by rapid changes, which introduce new uncertainties and contest old securities. We need novel ways of mobilising knowledge for water infrastructures that readmits communities’ diverse cultural interactions with water to promote adaptive decision-making. The CANALS project begins from three claims; (i) that current understandings of water, climate and infrastructures struggle to address emerging uncertainties due to climate change; (ii) that a proper regard for water cultures is needed to overcome these obstacles; particularly by (iii) extending the ‘peer communities’ of diverse knowledge-holders. CANALS’ water culture perspective understands cultures as both practices and systems of symbols and meanings. It recognises the hybrid character of water, which exists independently of humans and at the same time is culturally enacted through human practices. It also sees infrastructures as social practices connecting people and objects in the world in socio-material relations. A water-cultural perspective thus better captures the complex processes around water infrastructures in the context of challenges posed by climate change. Adopting an innovative water culture perspective, CANALS will first make visible the spectrum of knowledges and practices used by different social groups for maintaining infrastructures. Going further, the project will develop transdisciplinary ways of convening an ‘extended peer community’ of water stakeholders, to together appraise the quality of their water knowledges for policy-making.
Project
CoCliServ explores novel ways to transform climate science into action-oriented place-based climate services to engage, enable and empower local communities, knowledge brokers and scientists to act locally. It seeks to identify future information needs and the nature of the climate science needed to address the local communities’ concerns, aspirations and goals in view of climate variability and climate change.