Satu Koivisto

Satu Koivisto
University of Helsinki | HY

PhD Archaeology

About

40
Publications
7,985
Reads
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170
Citations
Citations since 2017
18 Research Items
148 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230102030
20172018201920202021202220230102030
Introduction
I am an archaeologist with a particular interest in wetlands. My main research topics concern Mesolithic and Neolithic wetland sites and waterlogged organic materials, prehistoric fishing techniques, and archaeological prospection. Currently, I work with a multidisciplinary study focusing on the preservation and sedimentation of organic archaeological remains at a paludified Stone Age (c. 6000-2000 cal BCE) lake settlement of Järvensuo 1, in SW Finland.
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - August 2022
University of Turku
Position
  • Academy of Finland Postdoc
Description
  • PI in the project: Perish and fade away - Sedimentation and preservation of organic archaeological remains in wetland environments (322331)
December 2018 - August 2019
University of Helsinki
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Postdoc grant by Finnish Cultural Foundation
August 2017 - November 2018
University of Helsinki
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Project manager Lost Inland Landscapes

Publications

Publications (40)
Chapter
Full-text available
Peatlands constitute central habitats for the occurrence of wetland archaeological sites. Consisting of waterlogged organic soils, they also provide advantageous conditions for the preservation of organic materials. The economic utilisation of peatlands has been extensive and long-lasting in mire-rich Finland. Archaeologists urgently seek to develo...
Article
Full-text available
The wetland site of Järvensuo 1 is located by the southern shore of the overgrown and drained Lake Rautajärvi in Humppila, south-west Finland. The peatland drainage and small-scale wetland excavations have revealed a rare corpus of organic archaeological and palaeoenvironmental remains from prehistory, which have been preserved in moist anoxic cond...
Article
Full-text available
Figurines made of wood, bone, amber, clay and lithics are occasionally discovered in prehistoric contexts in Fennoscandia, but the discovery, in 2020, of a unique wooden snake figurine during the excavations of a Neolithic wetland site in Finland broadens our understanding of the worldview of northern peoples 4400 years ago.
Article
Full-text available
In August 2018, a group of experts working with terrestrial/marine geophysics and remote sensing methods to explore archaeological sites in Denmark, Finland, Norway, Scotland and Sweden gathered together for the first time at the Workshop ‘Sensing Archaeology in The North’. The goal was to exchange experiences, discuss challenges, and consider futu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cutting-edge interdisciplinary research of the last 10-15 years has clearly demonstrated that aquatic resources have constituted an essential part of the economic base of the early and mid Holocene hunter-gatherers of Northern Europe and, therefore, it may be better to refer to these groups as hunter-fisher-gatherer communities. New research has re...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Salmonid resources currently foster socioeconomic prosperity in several nations, yet their importance to many ancient circumpolar societies is poorly understood due to insufficient fish bone preservation at archaeological sites. As a result, there are serious gaps in our knowledge concerning the antiquity of northern salmonid fisheries and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The landscapes of the Baltic Sea’s eastern shores, shaped by glacial and marine processes, present flat and hilly terrain, with many lakes, extensive wetlands and a long coastline with extensive gulfs. These landscape features offered the hunter-fisher-gatherer populations of the Stone Age rich concentrations of subsistence resources – although it...
Article
During the Early and Mid-Holocene significant changes in the ecology and socio-cultural spheres occurred around the Baltic Sea. Because of the underlying climatic changes and thus environmental alterations, the area was the scene for various cultural developments during the period under investigation. In the course of the melting of the glaciers at...
Article
Full-text available
The huge scientific and interpretive value of wetland archaeological sites has been well demonstrated in several studies. The management of the archaeological resource of wetland landscapes is problematic, however, and there is an urgent need for noninvasive techniques to detect waterlogged organic archaeological remains. Stationary wooden fishing...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Stationary wooden structures associated with fisheries are currently the most common type of wetland archaeological site in Finland. Nearly 100 sites containing wooden stationary structures have been discovered in peatlands and muddy lake sediments. The wooden remains have been deposited in peatlands due to isostatic land uplift, lake terrestrializ...
Chapter
Rapid economic development and mechanization of forestry since the 1970s have created conflicts between the interests of cultural heritage management and those of the forestry industry. Ecological and social sustainability are keywords of Finnish forestry and also are often mentioned in international conventions relating to cultural heritage. Nonet...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The purpose of this session is to bring together specialists who work on wetland sites dating from the end of the last Ice Age to the introduction of farming. The excellent organic preservation of such sites provide a unique insight into past lives and have an enormous importance for the understanding of our past – especially for the temperate clim...
Book
Full-text available
This study seeks to draw attention to the lack of knowledge of and the small amount of research dealing with archaeological cultural resources in Finnish wetlands, as well as to demonstrate its huge scientific and interpretative potential. To this end, the study presents a compilation of Finnish wetland archaeological sites, contextualizes and eval...
Article
Pollen-inferred quantitative reconstruction of past vegetation cover on the coastal mainland and in the archipelago of southern Finland are presented on a regional spatial scale using the REVEALS model and on local spatial scales using the LOVE model.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Regional and chronological development of fishing: Its significance in past economies and their socioeconomic dynamics Fishing was one of the simplest sources of livelihood in prehistory. Where available, fish constitutes an important food resource. Apart from the nutritional value, all parts of the fish have been utilised for various purposes. H...
Article
Full-text available
We still lack basic knowledge of the intensity and character of fishing as subsistence among the Stone Age populations of the northeast shores of the Baltic Sea. In locations where direct evidence of fish utilisation is insufficient, various forms of indirect evidence play an essential role. Generalisations about the importance of fishing are mainl...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
New research on European wetland, bog or underwater sites with well-preserved organics expands our understanding of the importance of aquatic resources in the economy of prehistoric Hunter-Fisher-Gatherer groups in Europe. The excellent preservation led not only to the discovery of active fishing gear like hooks, spears, leisters or tridents but al...
Article
Full-text available
One of the many unique environments of Finland is its inland with waterways and lakes. The Saimaa Lake complex in the eastern part of Finland has constituted one of the major inland water systems throughout our prehistory. In the earlier stages, the water level of the small lakes was relatively low. Due to the post-glacial land uplift and lake tilt...
Article
Full-text available
Rovaniemen Koskenniskan kivikautinen asuinpaikka oli arkeologisten kaivaustutkimusten kohteena vuosina 2012-2013. Kaivauksilla paljastettiin paikalla sijainneen ns. Kolpeneen muinaisjärven tulvan osittain paksulla hiekkakerroksella peittämä kivikautinen asuinpaikka vajaan 5000 vuoden takaa. Löydöt ovat pääasiassa tavallista asuinpaikan jätemateriaa...
Article
Full-text available
Suomi on Euroopan metsäisin maa: noin 75 % maapinta-alastamme on metsäkasvil-lisuuden peitossa. Kuitenkin tiedot metsissä sijaitsevien arkeologisten kohteiden määrästä, luonteesta tai sijainnista ovat pitkälti vanhen-tuneita tai jopa puutteellisia. Vajavaiset tiedot metsissä sijaitsevista muinaisjäännöksistä ovat johtaneet lukuisiin vahinkoihin teh...
Article
Full-text available
A wetland site discovered accidentally in the western part of the Kierikki area in Yli-Ii, Northern Ostrobothnia, Finland, surprised archaeologists in the mid 1990s by its size and the rare degree of preservation of the organic finds. A number of wooden objects had already been found during the draining of the present-day peatland agricultural fiel...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
SylFish aims to investigate the effects of human exploitation and environmental change on marine fauna in the coastal waters of Lolland from the Late Mesolithic to the Bronze Age (c. 5500–600 BC). The project will focus on the ecology and economy of prehistoric societies and their relationship with the sea by addressing landscape changes, subsistence economies, and self-perceptions through the analysis of aquatic and terrestrial faunal remains, fishing structures, and patterns in the exploitation of marine fauna. Qualitative and quantitative measures will help us understand the relevance of aquatic resources to prehistoric communities, provide information on human impacts on the environment in the past and peoples’ reactions to changing ecological and economic conditions.
Project
With this pre-project study, I aim to further our understanding about the history of a prehistoric settlement site (Järvensuo in Humppila, SW Finland, c. 3500–500 BCE) situated in a dynamic wetland landscape. The unusual preservation conditions for organic materials within this site under humid, saturated sediments yield valuable sources for investigating past populations and their environment. The existing materials accumulated via drainage operations in the 1950s and onwards and the preliminary excavations in the 80s will be thoroughly analysed, catalogued, and reported within this study, which will form the basis for the assessment of research potential and state of preservation of the site for the planning of the implementation project and archaeological fieldwork.
Project
Archaeological sites can be discovered and recorded in a high-resolution and non-invasive manner using geophysical methods. These measure the spatial variation of a range of physical properties of the soil which may be representative proxies of the subsurface archaeology. Less-invasive and cost-effective field procedures have become top-priority to mitigate the destructive effects on our cultural heritage from intensified land use, climate change and the current conflict panorama. At a time when many organisations are investing in advanced geophysical equipment, a major problem is that our ability to fully interpret the information available from geophysical datasets is still very limited. This deficiency prevents geophysical survey moving beyond basic prospection and becoming a significant tool for answering nuanced questions about archaeology and their host landscapes. This limitation arises from an incomplete understanding of the relationship between soil properties and geophysical measurements. Bridging this gap requires multi-disciplinary teams, testing novel methods, plus scholarly discussion to collate the outcomes of projects on this topic. Overcoming these challenges is a prerequisite for maximising the cost-effectiveness of geophysical methods, realising the expected benefits of technological investment and allowing broader utility of geophysical methods in the cultural heritage sector. SAGA will build an international network of geophysicists, archaeologists, soil scientists and other experts to develop our capability to interpret geophysical data and promote research collaborations. Our vision is that after four years, SAGA will have created an environment within which emerging field procedures, enhanced data interpretation and a broader understanding of integrated geophysical methods can flourish.