Sarina Hui-Lin Chien

Sarina Hui-Lin Chien
China Medical University (ROC) · Institute of Neural & Cognitive Sciences

Ph.D. University of Washington

About

76
Publications
10,774
Reads
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351
Citations
Citations since 2017
31 Research Items
175 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
Additional affiliations
August 2011 - present
China Medical University (ROC)
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2007 - July 2011
China Medical University (ROC)
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
September 1997 - June 2003
University of Washington Seattle
Field of study
  • Psycholology
September 1993 - June 1995
National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan
Field of study
  • Experimental Psychology

Publications

Publications (76)
Article
Objectives: Racially ambiguous face categorization research is growing in prominence, and yet the majority of this work has focused on White and Western samples and has primarily used biracial Black/White stimuli. Past findings suggest that biracial Black/White faces are more often seen as Black than White, but without testing these perceptions wi...
Article
Full-text available
People often find it more difficult to recognize other- than own-race faces. This other-race effect is robust across numerous ethnic groups. Yet, it remains unclear how this effect changes in people who live in a multiracial environment, and in immigrants whose lifetime perceptual experience changes over time. In the present study, we developed a n...
Article
Full-text available
Face perception involves both configural and featural processing. The developmental progression of configural versus featural processing in childhood remains debated. To date, most studies focused on western children; furthermore, the link between face processing and empathy in children is less well-understood. The present study investigated the de...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Involuntary admission to psychiatric inpatient care can protect both patients with severe mental illnesses and individuals around them. This study analyzed annual healthcare costs per person for involuntary psychiatric admission and examined categories of mental disorders and other factors associated with mortality. Methods: This retr...
Article
Full-text available
Recognizing faces and objects are essential perceptual skills for human survival. Previous studies exploring face and object perception in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) reported inconclusive results. Some studies suggested that adults with ASD exhibited impaired face processing but spared object perception; in contrast, other stud...
Preprint
Objectives: Racially ambiguous face categorization research is growing in prominence, and yet the majority of this work has focused on White and Western samples and has primarily used biracial Black/White stimuli. Past findings suggest that biracial Black/White faces are more often seen as Black than White, but without testing these perceptions wit...
Article
Full-text available
Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) suffer from motor and non-motor symptoms; 40% would develop dementia (PD-D). Impaired face and emotion processing in PD has been reported; however, the deficits of face processing in PD-D remain unclear. We investigated three essential aspects of face processing capacity in PD-D, and the associations between c...
Presentation
Full-text available
Face recognition is fundamental to social life; our ability to recognize faces develops soon after birth and continues to improve across childhood and early adolescence. As the human advances in age, face recognition memory gradually declines, especially at the later stages of adulthood. Prior knowledge and memory are known to aid in recognizing fa...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a degenerative brain disease. As it progresses, the patients often develop dementia (PD-D) which affect their mental functions. Previous studies revealed PD patients with impaired facial identity recognition and emotion perception; however, few studies explored face discrimination and dynamic facial emotion...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction: Race is a perceptual and social category. People automatically encode the race of indivduals and often categorize them by which. Many studies examined the behavioral effects of race on face recognition and categorization; very few investigated the neural underpinnings of race perception. Here we explore the spatiotemporal characterist...
Conference Paper
Adults show an other-race effect (ORE): impaired recognition of other- versus own-race faces1. The ORE manifests as a difficulty recognizing other-race faces across variability in appearance, likely due to asymmetric experience with own- and other-race faces2,3. No study has systematically investigated how the ability to form stable facial represen...
Article
Full-text available
The broadly defined other-race effect (ORE) refers to differential processing for own- and other-race faces, such as own-race face recognition advantage and categorization bias for racially ambiguous faces. The present study adopted bi-racial (East Asian and Caucasian) morph face images as stimuli, aiming to explore the development of race categori...
Article
Full-text available
Background Whether individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have impairments with biological motion perception has been debated. The present study examined the ability to identify point‐light‐displayed (PLD) human actions in neurotypical (NT) adults and adults with ASD. Method Twenty‐seven adults with ASD (mean age = 28.36) and 30 NT adults...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background: In daily social interactions, people are not only guided by the actions of individuals but also influenced by the social categories to which they belong. In a single glance, one can quickly encode a person’s gender, race, and age; and these features consequently affects how one evaluates the individuals (Fiske, 1998). Among these, race...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Race perception is an automatic process; however, the underlying neural mechanisms are still unclear. We explored the neural mechanisms of race processing, particularly the correlations between race categorization and M170 and M250 components. We recruited 13 Asian participants (mean age: 24.27 ± 2.13). The MEG experiment was conducted with the Ele...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
PURPOSE: Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) primarily suffer from motor deficits; as the disease progresses, they often develop dementia (PD-D) that affect their quality of life. Previous studies revealed PD patients with impaired facial identity recognition and emotion perception; however, few studies explored face discrimination threshold and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent studies revealed that the development of face processing might take an entire childhood to develop fully, and configural face processing appears to develop more slowly than featural face processing. Up to date, most of the empirical studies focused on western children, and the relations between face processing and empathy in children is rare...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction. Previous studies on the other-race effect (ORE) in preschoolers and children mostly focused on recognition memory performance; however, the onset of ORE has been inconclusive across studies. Here we wish to explore the development of the ORE in 3- to 7-year-old Taiwanese children with a simultaneous morphing face discrimination task....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
PURPOSE: Previous studies showed that individuals with ASD adopted a featural-based rather than holistic/configural-based processing to distinguish among faces and objects. The present study aim to directly test holistic face processing, and to investigate face and object discrimination with equated task difficulties in adults with Asperger syndrom...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
PURPOSE: Previous studies showed that individuals with ASD adopted a featural-based rather than holistic/configural-based processing to distinguish among faces and objects. The present study aim to directly test holistic face processing, and to investigate face and object discrimination with equated task difficulties in adults with Asperger syndrom...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies examining the other-race effect in school-age children mostly focused on recognition memory performance. Here we investigated perceptual discriminability for Asian-like versus Caucasian-like morph faces in school-age Taiwanese children and adults. One-hundred-and-two 5- to 12-year-old children and twenty-three adults performed a se...
Article
Full-text available
People go beyond the inferences afforded by a person’s observable features to make guesses about personality traits or even social memberships such as political affiliations. The present study extended Hu et al. (2016) to further investigate the influence of provincial appearance on differentiating KMT (Kuomintang) and DPP (Democratic Progressive P...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Successful recognition of faces and objects surrounding us is fundamental to survival. Previous studies showed that individuals with ASD adopted a featural-based rather than second-order configural-based processing to distinguish among faces and objects. However, a direct test of whether individuals with ASD adopt any holistic processing is lacking...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Face recognition is fundamental to social interactions. Recent studies revealed that individual differences in face recognition ability vary within the healthy population, and Empathy Quotient (EQ) is positively associated with individual's performance in face recognition memory. However, the link between EQ and the featural versus configural aspec...
Article
Full-text available
Successful recognition of faces and objects surrounding us is fundamental to survival. Previous studies showed that healthy adults performed better than individuals with autism on face recognition , but not on object recognition. However, the evidence has been inconclusive. The present study investigated the perceptual sensitivity on face and objec...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recognition of individual faces is an integral part of social interaction. Previous studies showed Western healthy adults performed better than individuals with autism on face-recognition, but not on object-recognition (Wallace et al., 2008). However, the evidence has been inconclusive. The present study investigated the perceptual sensitivity on f...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In developing the fifth core knowledge about social partners, race is an important factor biasing children to form social affiliations. The present study explored the development of the race-based social preferences in 3- to 8-year-old Taiwanese children. In Experiment 1, twenty-one 3-4 year-olds viewed three simultaneously presented video clips mo...
Article
Full-text available
Previous infant studies on the other-race effect have favored the perceptual narrowing view, or declined sensitivities to rarely exposed other-race faces. Here we wish to provide an alternative possibility, perceptual learning, manifested by improved sensitivity for frequently exposed own-race faces in the first year of life. Using the familiarizat...
Conference Paper
Previous studies have shown that adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have sensory-motor dysfunction. The present study aimed to compare the balance and walking performance in healthy adults and adults with Asperger (AS) or high functioning autism (HFA). Twenty-one AS/HFA (aged 20.1-42.9 years) and 30 healthy adults (aged 19.5-28.4 years) rec...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent studies demonstrated impaired biological motion perception in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Using point-light displays portraying human actions interacting with (i.e., paddling) or without objects (i.e., running), the present study examined the action identification performance in healthy adults and adults with Asperger (AS) or...
Article
Full-text available
The own-race recognition advantage and the other-race categorization bias have been robustly demonstrated (Levin, 1996). Using a morphing face paradigm similar to Walker and Tanaka (2003), the present study designed two experiments to test whether the own-race encoding advantage and the other-race classification advantage exist in Taiwanese partici...
Article
Full-text available
Primitive, and invariant across degraded visual settings, topological properties may serve as the basis for object recognition in an ever-changing world. The present study investigated whether human neonates exhibit an intrinsic visual sensitivity for a frequently encountered topological property, the presence or absence of a hole in a 2D shape. Us...
Article
Full-text available
The present study aims to replicate and extend Rule and Ambady (2010a)'s findings that Republicans and Democrats could be differentiated by face. In Experiment 1, undergraduates categorized 50 gray-scale full-face photos of candidates of the two major political parties in Taiwan, the Kuomingtang (KMT) and the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP). Usi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
生物性運動知覺(biological motion perception)在個體生存上扮演重要角色;近期研究發現自閉症光譜症候群(Autism Spectrum Disorder,簡稱ASD)患者以及正常族群成人自閉症光譜量表(Autism-spectrum Quotient,簡稱AQ)得分高者,對於生物性運動的辨識表現較差。本研究主要目的想探討成人自閉特質程度和生物性運動知覺能力的關聯性,以及此知覺辨識能力是否也與其他執行功能相關。研究對象為醫藥相關科系學生,乃因先前國內外研究多以文、理學院學生為主,缺乏醫藥相關領域的資料。研究主要作業有三項:一是以光點呈現(point-light displays,簡稱PLD)的人類生物性動作電腦化辨識作業;此作業共有20個人類生物性運動動作,其中一半為...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Rule and Ambady (2010) found that Republicans and Democrats can be differentiated by face. The present study aims to replicate and extend. In Experiment 1, university students differentiated 100 gray-scale full-face photos of candidates of the two major political parties in Taiwan, the Kuomingtang (KMT) and the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), 5...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
People often say they find it difficult to distinguish between individuals of other races, which is known as the "other-race effect". The other-race effect (ORE) refers to better recognition memory for faces of one’s own race than faces of other unfamiliar races. Using a morphed face paradigm, Walker and Tanaka (2003) reported an encoding advantage...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Literature on the other-race effect (ORE) in face recognition had lent a strong support for a significantly higher accuracy, adults or children alike, in recalling faces of their own race. Yet little was known as to the exact stage of visual processing at which ORE came into play. Using a morphed face paradigm, Walker and Tanaka (2003) reported a s...
Article
Full-text available
The characteristics of aberrant face processing in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been extensively studied, but the aspect regarding sensitivity to race is relatively unexplored. The present study hypothesized that the magnitude of the other-race effect shall be reduced in individuals with ASD owing to their inattention to fac...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Biological motion perception is present at birth; it plays an important role in helping individuals adapt to their social environment. Recent studies revealed impaired biological motion perception in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who are characterized by marked deficits in social interaction and communication. Using point-light disp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction: Lines of evidence from adult psychophysics, brain imaging, and honeybee’s behavior have supported the topology theory of visual perception (Chen, 1982). Previously, we tested young infants and found an early sensitivity for topological property around 6 weeks onward. To further explore whether such sensitivity might be innate, here we...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background: The other-race effect (ORE) is a widely known observation that we can recognize own-race faces better than other-race faces (Meissner & Brigham, 2001). The face processing deficit in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is broadly studied; however, the aspect regarding race sensitivity in autistic children’s face processing is relatively unex...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence from adult psychophysics, brain imaging, and honeybee's behaviour has been reported to support the notion that topological properties are the primitives of visual representation (Chen, 1982 Science 218 699-700). Here, we ask how the sensitivity to topological property might originate during development. Specifically, we tested 1.5- to 6-mo...
Article
Full-text available
Sarina Hui-Lin Chien and Hsin Yueh Hsu Graduate Institute of Neural & Cognitive Sciences, China Medical University Neonates display reliable visual preferences for human faces and face-like stimuli, which has been taken as strong evidence for an innate domain-specific bias toward faces. Alternatively, neonatal face preference can be explained by a...
Article
Background: Several lines of evidence from adult psychophysics, brain imaging data, and honeybee's behavior have supported the notion that topological properties are the primitives of visual representation (Chen, 1982). However, the developmental origin of the sensitivity to topological properties in infancy has not been explored. Thus, the present...
Article
Full-text available
The present study aims to explore whether young infants can use similarity principle to group visual patterns. Two kinds of form similarity were employed in the study: topological and geometrical properties. Using familiarization/novelty preference procedure, we tested 3- to 6-month-old infants with three kinds of pattern discrimination tasks in th...
Article
Full-text available
A non-specific "top-heavy" configuration bias has been proposed to explain neonatal face preference (F. Simion, E. Valenza, V. Macchi Cassia, C. Turati, & C. Umiltà, 2002). Using an eye tracker (Tobii T60), we investigated whether the top-heavy bias is still present in 3- to 5.5-month-old infants and in adults as a comparison group. Each infant and...
Conference Paper
Other-race-effect (ORE) refers to the observation that we can recognize own-race faces better than other-race faces (Meissner & Brigham, 2001). Yet, whether featural or configural face processing might contribute to other-race effect is still unclear. In the present study, we tested Taiwanese adults with faces of four ethnic groups (Taiwanese, Phil...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence from adult psychophysics, brain imaging, and honeybee's behavior has been reported to support the notion that topological properties are the primitives of visual representation (Chen, 1982). The present study aims to explore the question of how the sensitivity to topological property might originate during development. Specifically, we tes...
Article
Full-text available
The other-race effect (ORE) refers to the phenomenon that we can discriminate own-race faces better than other-race faces. The present study aims to explore the face processing ability for own-race and other-race faces in Taiwanese infants aged between 4 and 9 months when the visual system is still maturing. The stimuli contained faces of three eth...
Article
Purpose. The luminance ratios of adjacent regions often stay constant across changes in illumination (Wallach, 1948). Chien (ARVO 2002) found that 4-month-old infants showed lightness constancy when a consistent local luminance ratio cue was present across changes in illumination. By manipulating the reflectance of the surround, we tested whether i...
Article
Simion, Valenza, Macchi Cassia, Turati, and Umiltà (2002) suggested that newborns preferred "top-heavy" stimuli and such bias may account for neonatal face preference. However, convergent evidence for the discriminability between the top-heavy versus bottom-heavy patterns has not been demonstrated. We used a modified familiarization/novelty procedu...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose. It is well documented that infants exhibit visual preferences for real faces and facelike patterns. Recent studies (Simion et al, 2002; Turati, 2004) showed that newborns preferred a non-facelike stimulus with more elements in the upper part of a configuration, and demonstrated that up-down asymmetry is crucial in determining their face pr...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose. Using a flight simulator for Drosophila melanogaster, Ernst & Heisenberg (1999) reported that several parameters like size, color, and vertical compactness could be used as cues for visual discrimination in tethered flies. However, a puzzling result was found in their original study—flies failed in conditioned discrimination between a cros...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose. Most of the studies on the characteristics of visual short-term memory (VSTM) used somewhat familiar stimuli, such as simple visual attributes (e.g., color, orientation), entry-level objects, faces, or natural scenes. However, with these types of visual material, it is difficult to completely rule out the influence of individual subject's...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The present study adopted a computerized test to explore visual short-term memory performance for Hepatitis C patients, depressed patients, healthy controls, and college students. The patient groups were tested at the clinic while the normal groups were tested in the laboratory. Each trial began with a fixation cross, then a red abstract pattern ap...
Article
Purpose. A recent study (Meng & Tong, 2004) indicated attention can selectively bias the intended percept for ambiguous figures (i.e. Necker cube) but not binocular rivalry displays. For Necker cubes, attentional control (or “top-down” influence) may operate by enhancing the desired representation, or suppressing the alternative representation. In...
Article
Why do people perseverate, repeating prior behaviours that are no longer appropriate? Many accounts point to isolated deficits in processes such as inhibition or attention. We instead posit a fundamental difference in rule representations: flexible switchers use active representations that rely on later-developing prefrontal cortical areas and are...
Article
Taiwan's Government web portal has been the sole communication link between citizens and E-Government since being launched in 2002 to provide citizens with government-related information promptly via effective classification. The assessment of the service quality and citizens' satisfaction with E-Government has rarely been explored. The present stu...
Article
In the present study, discrete trial familiarization/novelty techniques were used to study lightness constancy in 4-month-old infants. The test stimuli were real objects (paper smiley faces) of two different reflectances, dark gray (17% reflectance) and light gray (54% reflectance). In Experiment 1, the test stimuli were viewed against a white (90%...
Article
When adults view a disk of light embedded in a higher luminance surround, the perceived lightness of the disk is largely determined by the surround to disk luminance ratio (Wallach's ratio rule). In the present study, both adult and infant subjects were tested with multiple discrete trial procedures in which the surround luminance was decreased bet...
Article
When adults view a test disk embedded in a higher-luminance surround, the perceived lightness of the disk is largely determined by the surround-to-disk (S/D) luminance ratio (Wallach's ratio rule). Performance of 4-month-old infants tested with a forced-choice novelty-preference technique was consistent with predictions based on Wallach's ratio rul...
Conference Paper
Purpose: Chien at al. (ARVO 2001) reported that infants as young as 4 months exhibit adult-like simultaneous lightness contrast. Infants' lightness perception approximately follows Wallach’s ratio rule, indicating that the ability to extract information about luminance ratios is present early in infancy. Our present goal is to test whether infants...
Article
Purpose. Chien at al. (ARVO 2001) reported that, tested with grey stimuli against a homogeneous white background field, 4-month-old infants exhibit adult-like simultaneous lightness contrast. By manipulating the background reflectance, our present goal is to test whether infants exhibit lightness constancy when either the anchoring cue or the local...
Article
Individual differences in isoluminance values were studied in infants and adults using a motion nulling paradigm. Two luminance-modulated sinusoidal grating components (spatial frequency=0.25 cpd, temporal frequency=5.6 Hz, speed=22.4 deg/s) were superimposed and moved in opposite directions across a color video screen. The contrasts of the two com...
Article
Purpose. In adult literature, lightness constancy tends to breakdown when a white anchoring point is absent. Using real surfaces and real illuminants, Chien & Teller. (OSA 2001) reported that 4-month-old infants exhibit lightness constancy tested with a white background. Our present goal is to test whether infants show a reduced constancy when a wh...
Article
The scotopic to photopic transition was tested in adults and 12-week-old infants using a large field motion nulling technique at a series of luminances between −3.57 and 2.70 log cd m−2. The stimuli were composed of 0.25 cyc deg−1, 5.6 Hz blue/black and yellow/black sinusoidal grating components, superimposed and moving in opposite directions. The...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 2003 In theories of adult lightness perception, the determination of the perceived lightness of a region involves at least two major steps. First, the visual system computes the luminance ratios between that region and its surrounding areas (a local luminance ratio cue), and second, the region that has the...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Specifically, if we use an eye-tracking device to record the spontaneous viewing of an observer, what kind of evidence might indicate successful perceptual grouping (i.e., by Gestalt laws of similarity, proximity, continuation etc...) versus a no grouping? I will appreciate if anyone can point out a few good reference papers.

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The project was the first to explore face perception and biological motion perception in Taiwanese children and Taiwanese adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD).
Project
Exploring face processing capacity in clinical patient group by using morphing face techniques to detect subtle impairments that cannot be revealed by standard neuro-cognitive tests such as MMSE and MOCA.
Project
Investigate the development of other-race face discrimination, ambigous bi-race categorization, and race-based social preference in preschoolers and school-age children.