Sarian Kosten

Sarian Kosten
Radboud University | RU · Department of Aquatic Ecology and Environmental Biology

Dr.

About

137
Publications
61,450
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5,798
Citations
Citations since 2017
69 Research Items
4408 Citations
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201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,000
201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,000

Publications

Publications (137)
Article
Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from small inland waters are disproportionately large. Climate warming is expected to favour dominance of algae and free-floating plants at the expense of submerged plants. Through different routes these functional plant types may have far-reaching impacts on freshwater GHG emissions in future warmer waters, which are...
Article
Wetlands are large sources of methane (CH4), and plant-mediated fluxes can contribute considerably to their total CH4 emissions. However, plant-mediated fluxes vary considerably even within species, and the factors explaining this variation are not fully understood. This study focuses on the role of plant traits and environmental conditions in regu...
Preprint
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NON FORMATED PUBLISHED VERSION Feedbacks between climate change and eutrophication: revisiting the allied attack concept and how to strike back Despite its well-established negative impacts on society and biodiversity, eutrophication continues to be one of the most pervasive anthropogenic influence along the freshwater to marine continuum. The i...
Article
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Freshwater ecosystems are an important source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4), and their emissions are expected to increase due to eutrophication. Two commonly applied management techniques to reduce eutrophication are the addition of phosphate-binding lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB, trademark Phoslock©) and dredging, but their effect on CH4...
Article
Severe eutrophication threatens freshwater systems around the world. The application of aquatic buffer zones with plants, for example around agricultural lands, can increase nutrient retention and thereby reduce nutrient loading to downstream systems. However, not much is known about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from these buffer zones and how th...
Article
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Microbes play a critical role in plant litter decomposition and influence the fate of carbon in rivers and riparian zones. When decomposing low‐nutrient plant litter, microbes acquire nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from the environment (i.e., nutrient immobilization), and this process is potentially sensitive to nutrient loading and changing clima...
Article
Despite its well-established negative impacts on society and biodiversity, eutrophication continues to be one of the most pervasive anthropogenic influence along the freshwater to marine continuum. The interaction between eutrophication and climate change, particularly climate warming, was explicitly focused upon a decade ago in the paper by Moss e...
Article
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To investigate the potential long-term consequences of environmental warming in subtropical systems, we compare the trophic structure of shallow lakes in tropical and subtropical regions. In total, 25 meso-eutrophic lakes with piscivorous fish were sampled during summer along a latitudinal gradient in South America. The fish catch per unit of effor...
Article
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Body size is usually considered a good indicator of trophic position in fish communities. Indeed, the proverbial wisdom that “Big Fish Eat Little Fish” is consistent with observations from marine systems where systematic removal of the largest individuals has occurred, with cascading effect in the ecosystems. Trophic cascades are also well document...
Preprint
Full-text available
Freshwater ecosystems, including wetlands, lakes, and running waters, are estimated to contribute roughly 40% to global emissions of methane (CH4), a highly potent greenhouse gas. The emission of CH4 to the atmosphere entails the diffusive, ebullitive, and plant-mediated pathway. The latter, in particular, has been largely understudied and is neith...
Article
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Fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in shallow lakes are strongly affected by dominant primary producers which mostly has been studied in temperate and boreal regions. We compared summer CO2 and CH4 fluxes (diffusion and ebullition) in littoral and pelagic zones of three subtropical shallow lakes with contrasting regimes: clear-vegetat...
Article
Despite substantial advances in quantifying greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from dry inland waters, existing estimates mainly consist of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However, methane (CH4) may also be relevant due to its higher Global Warming Potential (GWP). We report CH4 emissions from dry inland water sediments to i) provide a cross-continenta...
Article
Full-text available
River plastic pollution is an environmental challenge of growing concern. However, there are still many unknowns related to the principal drivers of river plastic transport. Floating aquatic vegetation, such as water hyacinths, have been found to aggregate and carry large amounts of plastic debris in tropical river systems. Monitoring the entrapmen...
Article
Full-text available
• Shallow aquatic systems exchange large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) with the atmosphere. The production and consumption of both gases is determined by the interplay between abiotic (such as oxygen availability) and biotic (such as community structure and trophic interactions) factors. • Fish communities play a key role in dri...
Article
Full-text available
Water hyacinth is able to sequester large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) in wetlands. At the same time, the high production of organic matter combined with the plant’s capacity to limit the diffusion of oxygen from the atmosphere into the water creates favorable conditions for the production of methane (CH4). The combination of these mechanisms ch...
Preprint
Full-text available
River plastic pollution is an environmental challenge of growing concern. However, there are still many unknowns related to the principal drivers of river plastic transport. Floating aquatic vegetation, such as water hyacinths, have been found to aggregate and carry large amounts of plastic debris in tropical river systems. Monitoring the entrapmen...
Article
Full-text available
The restoration of degraded ecosystems and landscapes is challenging, because returning to the original state is often socio-economically unfeasible. A novel approach is to construct new ecosystems to improve the functioning of degraded landscapes. However, the development of novel ecosystems is largely driven by the pre-construction hydrogeophysic...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, there are millions of kilometres of drainage ditches which have the potential to emit the powerful greenhouse gas methane (CH4), but these emissions are not reported in budgets of inland waters or drained lands. Here, we synthesise data to show that ditches spanning a global latitudinal gradient and across different land uses emit large q...
Chapter
Regime shifts in inland waters are strong, abrupt, persistent changes in the structure and functioning of a system. Regime shifts typically describe transitions between contrasting ecological states. For instance, the shift from a clear lake, dominated by submerged vegetation, to a turbid, phytoplankton-dominated lake is a regime shift. In this cha...
Article
Water hyacinth is able to sequester large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO 2) in wetlands. At the same time, the high production of organic matter combined with the plant's capacity to limit the diffusion of oxygen from the atmosphere into the water creates favorable conditions for the production of methane (CH 4). The combination of these mechanisms...
Article
Documenting the patterns of biological diversity on Earth has always been a central challenge in macroecology and biogeography. However, we are only beginning to generate an understanding of the global patterns and determinants of macrophyte diversity. Here, we studied large-scale variation and community-environment relationships of lake macrophyte...
Article
Full-text available
The widespread wetland species Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. has the ability to transport gases through its stems via a pressurized flow. This results in a high oxygen (O2) transport to the rhizosphere, suppressing methane (CH4) production and stimulating CH4 oxidation. Simultaneously CH4 is transported in the opposite direction to th...
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While providing protein for a fast-growing human population, the ongoing boom in global aquaculture comes with environmental costs. Particularly, the intense greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reported for several aquaculture systems are a source of concern. Still, we argue that actual emissions could be multiple times higher than currently thought. Mo...
Article
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• Shallow lakes can shift between stable states as a result of anthropogenic or natural drivers. Four common stable states differ in dominant groups of primary producers: submerged, floating, or emergent macrophytes or phytoplankton. Shifts in primary producer dominance affect key supporting, provisioning, regulating, and cultural ecosystem service...
Article
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Viruses are important drivers in the cycling of carbon and nutrients in aquatic ecosystems. Since viruses are obligate parasites, their production completely depends on growth and metabolism of hosts and therefore can be affected by climate change. Here, we investigated if warming (+4°C) can change the outcome of viral infections in a natural fresh...
Article
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Many inland waters exhibit complete or partial desiccation, or have vanished due to global change, exposing sediments to the atmosphere. Yet, data on carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions from these sediments are too scarce to upscale emissions for global estimates or to understand their fundamental drivers. Here, we present the results of a global surve...
Article
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Water authorities responsible for water quantity and water quality management may strongly influence the magnitude of greenhouse gas emissions from the surface waters and the adjacent peat areas within their territories. Climate smart water management (reducing influx of organic matter and improving water quality) is therefore a potentially strong...
Article
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Increased periods of prolonged droughts followed by severe precipitation events are expected throughout South America due to climate change. Freshwater sediments are especially sensitive to these changing climate conditions. The increased oscillation of water levels in aquatic ecosystems causes enhanced cycles of sediment drying and rewetting. Here...
Article
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The future of formerly brackish peatlands: effects of salinization The last decades, Dutch former brackish peatlands have been heavily influenced by fresh surface water. The decrease in salinity led to a decrease of brackish water dependent species and Natura 2000 habitat types. Resalinization is currently considered. The present article summarizes...
Article
Documenting the patterns of biological diversity on Earth has always been a central challenge in macroecology and biogeography. However, for the diverse group of freshwater plants, such research program is still in its infancy. Here, we examined global variation in taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic beta diversity patterns of lake macrophytes u...
Article
Full-text available
Water hyacinth (WH), a large floating plant, plays an important role in the biogeochemistry and ecology of many freshwaters globally. Its biogeochemical impact on wetland functioning is strongly mediated by the microbiome associated with its roots. However, little is known about the structure and function of this WH rhizobiome and its relation to w...
Article
Full-text available
Reservoir sediments exposed to air due to water level fluctuations are strong sources of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). The spatial variability of CO2 fluxes from these drawdown areas are still poorly understood. In a reservoir in southeastern Brazil, we investigated whether CO2 emissions from drawdown areas vary as a function of neighboring lan...
Article
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Calcium (Ca) is an essential element for almost all living organisms. Here, we examined global variation and controls of freshwater Ca concentrations, using 440 599 water samples from 43 184 inland water sites in 57 countries. We found that the global median Ca concentration was 4.0 mg L−1 with 20.7% of the water samples showing Ca concentrations ≤...
Article
Data on salinity tolerance of aquatic plant species are scarce, but required to better understand species' responses in multiple stressed environments. We analyzed data from a Dutch Water board in the province of Zeeland according to the occurrence of plant taxa in relation to salinity (chloride concentration). The dataset contained 862 samples of...
Article
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Artificial water bodies like ditches, fish ponds, weirs, reservoirs, fish ladders, and irrigation channels are usually constructed and managed to optimize their intended purposes. However, human-made aquatic systems also have unintended consequences on ecosystem services and biogeochemical cycles. Knowledge about their functioning and possible addi...
Article
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• Pigments in lake surface sediments integrate both benthic and pelagic primary producer composition at the whole‐lake ecosystem level. • We gathered a comprehensive set of water chemistry, morphometric, physical and biological lake variables, catchment and climate characteristics, and geographical descriptors. We used multiple regressions to relat...
Article
The role of tropical lakes and reservoirs in the global carbon cycle has received increasing attention in the past decade, but our understanding of its variability is still limited. The metabolism of tropical systems may differ profoundly from temperate systems due to the higher temperatures and wider variations in precipitation. Here, we investiga...
Article
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Small water systems are important hotspots of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, but estimates are poorly constrained as data are scarce. Small ponds are often constructed in urban areas, where they receive large amounts of nutrients and therefore tend to be highly productive. Here, we investigated GHG emissions, seasonal and diel variation, and net ec...
Article
Full-text available
Global warming may intensify eutrophication of shallow lakes by affecting nutrient loading, evaporation rates, and water level and thus produce major changes in food webs. We investigated to what degree food webs in tropical humid lakes differed from those in more eutrophic semi-arid lakes of the same latitude. Our results indicate that the catchme...
Article
Full-text available
River ecosystems receive and process vast quantities of terrestrial organic carbon, the fate of which depends strongly on microbial activity. Variation in and controls of processing rates, however, are poorly characterized at the global scale. In response, we used a peer-sourced research network and a highly standardized carbon processing assay to...
Article
Full-text available
River ecosystems receive and process vast quantities of terrestrial organic carbon, the fate of which depends strongly on microbial activity. Variation in and controls of processing rates, however, are poorly characterized at the global scale. In response, we used a peer-sourced research network and a highly standardized carbon processing assay to...
Article
Full-text available
River ecosystems receive and process vast quantities of terrestrial organic carbon, the fate of which depends strongly on microbial activity. Variation in and controls of processing rates, however, are poorly characterized at the global scale. In response, we used a peer-sourced research network and a highly standardized carbon processing assay to...
Article
Full-text available
River ecosystems receive and process vast quantities of terrestrial organic carbon, the fate of which depends strongly on microbial activity. Variation in and controls of processing rates, however, are poorly characterized at the global scale. In response, we used a peer-sourced research network and a highly standardized carbon processing assay to...
Article
Full-text available
We studied community-environment relationships of lake macrophytes at two metacommunity scales using data from 16 regions across the world. More specifically, we examined (a) whether the lake macrophyte communities respond similar to key local environmental factors, major climate variables and lake spatial locations in each of the regions (i.e., wi...
Article
• Globally, aquatic systems face increasing challenges with respect to increased greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, eutrophication and strongly altered fish community composition. Although it is known that benthivorous fish can influence sediment and water column biogeochemistry, studies showing causal relationships are largely lacking. • Here, we use...
Article
Full-text available
Temperatures have been rising throughout recent decades and are predicted to rise further in the coming century. Global warming affects carbon cycling in freshwater ecosystems, which both emit and bury substantial amounts of carbon on a global scale. Currently, most studies focus on the effect of warming on overall carbon emissions from freshwater...
Article
Although previous studies suggest that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from reservoir sediment exposed to the atmosphere during drought may be substantial, this process has not been rigorously quantified. Here we determined carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions from sediment cores exposed to a drying and rewetting cycle. We found a strong...
Article
Full-text available
Global warming profoundly impacts the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. Nonetheless, the effect of warming on primary producers is poorly understood, especially periphyton production, which is affected both directly and indirectly by temperature-sensitive top-down and bottom-up controls. Here, we study the impact of warming on gross primary produc...
Article
Full-text available
Methane (CH4) strongly contributes to observed global warming. As natural CH4 emissions mainly originate from wet ecosystems, it is important to unravel how climate change may affect these emissions. This is especially true for ebullition (bubble flux from sediments), a pathway that has long been underestimated but generally dominates emissions. He...
Article
Water hyacinth stands are known to affect both nutrient concentrations in the water and carbon exchange with the atmosphere. However, both enhanced and reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been reported in relation to water hyacinth presence. This controversy may be explained by variation in plant density and rooting. High growth rates indic...
Article
Shallow lakes, the most prevalent type of freshwater ecosystems, can shift between clear states with macrophyte dominance and turbid, phytoplankton-dominated states. Such transformations, commonly termed regime shifts, have gained increasing attention in recent decades. Of 1084 studies documenting regime shifts, only 28% investigated the consequenc...
Article
Given the bioremediation potential of peat, natural capping of landfills in wetlands with a “peat cap” could provide a sustainable addition to regular capping methods using basal liners with limited life-spans and sand. It is unknown, however, which initial conditions optimise growth of this “peat cap” on top of a sand layer. Here, we tested the co...