Sarah L. Schooler

Sarah L. Schooler
State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry | SUNY-ESF · Department of Environmental and Forest Biology

Master of Science

About

14
Publications
1,499
Reads
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20
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
20 Citations
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Introduction
My current research focuses on population, behavior, and predator-prey interactions of Roosevelt elk and brown bears on Afognak Island, Kodiak Archipelago, Alaska. I am using population modeling to estimate populations of elk and brown bears, habitat suitability models to estimate resource use and probabilistic use, and optimization modeling to create a long-term model for timber harvest and elk habitat suitability on Afognak Island.
Additional affiliations
August 2022 - present
Michigan State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
July 2019 - December 2022
August 2017 - July 2019
Humboldt State University
Field of study
  • Wildlife
September 2011 - June 2015
University of Washington Seattle
Field of study
  • Environmental Science and Resource Management, Environmental Studies

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Vegetation structure is a crucial component of habitat selection for many taxa, and airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology is increasingly used to measure forest structure. Many studies have examined the relationship between LiDAR-derived structural characteristics and wildlife, but few have examined those characteristics in relati...
Article
Full-text available
Ungulates are key components of ecosystems due to their effects on lower trophic levels, role as prey, and value for recreational and subsistence harvests. Understanding factors that drive ungulate population dynamics can inform protection of important habitat and successful management of populations. To ascertain correlates of ungulate population...
Article
Full-text available
Protected areas that restrict human activities can enhance wildlife habitat quality. Efficacy of protected areas can be improved with increased protection from illegal activities and presence of buffer protected areas that surround a core protected area. Habitat value of protected areas also can be affected by seasonal variation in anthropogenic pr...
Preprint
Full-text available
Within optimal foraging theory animals should maximize their net energy gain while minimizing energetic costs. Energetic expenditure in wild animals is therefore key to measure proxies of fitness. Accelerometers are an effective tool to study animal movement-based energetics but retrieval of the device is usually required and often difficult. Measu...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the types and magnitude of human-caused mortality is essential for maintaining viable large carnivore populations. We used a database of cause-specific mortality to examine how hunting regulations and landscape configurations influenced human-caused mortality of North American gray wolves (Canis lupus). Our dataset included 21 studies...
Article
Full-text available
Within optimality theory, an animal’s home range can be considered a fitness-driven attempt to obtain resources for survival and reproduction while minimizing costs. We assessed whether brown bears (Ursus arctos) in two island populations maximized resource patches within home ranges (Resource Dispersion Hypothesis [RDH]) or occupied only areas nec...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Coffee is an important export for many developing countries, with a global annual trade value of $100 billion, but it is threatened by a warming climate. Shade trees may mitigate the effects of climate change through temperature regulation that can aid in coffee growth, slow pest reproduction, and sustain avian insectivore diversity. The impact...
Thesis
Full-text available
Coffee is an important export in many developing countries, with a global annual trade value of $100 billion. Climate change is projected to drastically reduce the area where coffee is able to be grown. Shade trees may mitigate the effects of climate change through temperature regulation for coffee growth, temperature regulation for pest control, a...
Poster
I examined how species distribution models of 7 species of avian insectivores in Kenya predicted bird presences on coffee farms as compared to shade. Shade tree density was a significant predictor of presence for certain bird species.
Thesis
Full-text available
Surplus killing and partial prey consumption are long-observed phenomena in ecology and behavioral research. However, the reasons behind observations of these phenomena have yet to be fully uncovered. There are multiple questions remaining in this field, but this research focused on a specific question in bear and salmon predatory interactions: how...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Beaches world-wide have low primary production due to a stressful environment and action of strong hydrodynamic forces. For this reason, input from marine wrack as well as terrestrial debris is an important source of production in food webs. Wrack can also provide food and habitat for meiofauna that help transfer nutrients up the food web. These in...
Thesis
Full-text available
Bats are an essential species for ecosystem function, but are also sensitive to habitat modification. This study compares bat occupancy and activity in Harrison pond, Barnaby reach in Skagit County, Washington, a heavily modified riparian area, to bat activity found in similar, unmodified areas in the Pacific Northwest. Echolocation calls were reco...

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