Sarah Oxley Heaney

Sarah Oxley Heaney
University of Exeter | UoE · Department of Sociology and Philosophy

MA Anthrozoology; MA Environment Policy and Society

About

6
Publications
292
Reads
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6
Citations
Citations since 2017
6 Research Items
6 Citations
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Introduction
Current research interests – trans-species shark-human relationships through the anthrozoological lens. www.kissingsharks.com
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - September 2019
University of Exeter
Position
  • Master's Student
Education
September 2016 - September 2019
University of Exeter
Field of study
  • Anthrozoology
July 2005 - July 2005
The Open University (UK)
Field of study
  • Environmental Decision Making
September 2003 - July 2008
The Open University (UK)
Field of study
  • Environment, Policy and Society

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the use of the term "feral" as a form of control over other animals. The concept of this "power word" is explored within the context of what it means for those who find themselves labelled as such. As a prefix, "feral" is used by various interest groups to justify the treatment of subpopulations of species, particularly with reg...
Article
Full-text available
The language of domestication enables humans to wield power over otherthanhuman animal lives. In some cases, being labelled “domesticated” ensures a life free of worry regarding food, water, and shelter. In others, “domestication” embodies a loss of agency, wildness, and potentially life. Companion animals such as cats find themselves at the center...
Article
Full-text available
The movement of otherthanhuman-animals (henceforth OTHA) across human-defined borders are often categorised depending upon human-assigned categories such as ‘invasive’, ‘introduced’, ‘non-native’ or ‘migrating’. However, there is a paucity of literature categorising OTHAs, from a posthuman, anthrozoological view, as immigrants. This paper examines,...
Presentation
Full-text available
Much academic literature looks at domestic cats outside home environments through an anthropocentric lens, as objects categorised for human control purposes. Such literature tends to categorise cats based on physical location or ownership status. This paper, in line with EASE aim iii attempts to consider the perspective of cats through their experi...
Presentation
Full-text available
Anthrozoology is an emergent field concerned with the study of human-animal interactions and relationships. As an emergent interdisciplinary field, Anthrozoology is in its infancy regarding methodological practice. For Anthrozoologists, research involves both human and animal as active participants and actors within ethnographic investigation. Con...
Presentation
Full-text available
Saudi Arabian Landscape of Feline Lives : Part 1 Available for viewing at https://youtu.be/qYLLIQTNvYo. Reducing Abandonment of Domestic Cats (Felis Silvestris Catus) by Analysing Reasons for Relinquishment in Saudi Arabia Domestic cats are ubiquitous in Saudi Arabia (KSA). They live in the streets, in homes, are bred, frequently traded and ofte...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Anthrozoology as International Practice (AIP) is a FREE conference that is hosted virtually by the University of Exeter’s Anthrozoology as Symbiotic Ethics (EASE) working group, which sees both humans and more-than-human animals as equally deserving of ethical consideration. AIP2021 was held 4-5 March 2021 (Online) AIP2022 is scheduled to take place 11-12 November 2022 (Online) This conference aims to spotlight research being undertaken by students around the world, in the hopes of building a global support network of likeminded individuals. Presentations based on PhD research proposals are also welcome. Senior academics and professionals are very welcome to attend, providing they understand this is a student conference and frame any questions or feedback in a nurturing and constructive manner. Please consider joining us to support your students and/or meet the next generation of aspiring anthrozoologists! https://anthrozoology.mysites.io/
Project
A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Welfare". Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 March 2023 Call for papers: Animal welfare is presented as the physical, mental, and emotional wellbeing of other-than-human animals. Humans have a responsibility to ensure the welfare needs of domesticated and/or otherwise captive animals are met. Some argue that the welfare needs of wild-living animals should also be considered. However, beliefs about what the needs of a species or an individual animal entail and what constitutes good practice can vary greatly. An understanding of different cultural perspectives is especially pertinent for researchers and animal advocates concerned with the welfare of animals situated in touristic, foreign (relative to the researcher), or culturally diverse contexts. Cultural sensitivity is argued as being paramount to building relationships and addressing concerns related to animal welfare. Furthermore, culture is being increasingly recognized as existing in various forms across species. For this Special Issue we welcome manuscripts that address animal welfare from a cross-cultural perspective, including more-than-human cultures. We are particularly interested in submissions that offer theoretical contributions towards more ethical and symbiotic relations between humans and more-than-human animals, and we also encourage submissions addressing the decolonization of animal welfare in academia and/or practice. https://www.mdpi.com/si/130935