Sarah Nason

Sarah Nason
Wapiti Studios

Master of Science

About

10
Publications
971
Reads
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11
Citations
Introduction
Sarah Nason currently works as a Communications Coordinator for CPAWS Northern Alberta. She is also self-employed as a science communicator for her own business, Wapiti Studios. She completed her MSc Biology in the Department of Biological Sciences at the Université du Québec à Montréal. Her MSc thesis work focused on applying evolutionary theory to conservation practice inside zoos and aquariums. Her background is broadly in ecology, evolutionary biology, and conservation.
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - February 2020
Fuse Consulting Ltd.
Position
  • Ecologist and Science Communicator
Description
  • In this role I specialized in translating technical scientific language and concepts into accessible, engaging written products such as reports, blogs and briefing notes. I also developed digital illustrations and infographics.
November 2015 - April 2016
New Zealand Department of Conservation
Position
  • Haast Kiwi Intern
Description
  • I learned alongside professionals working to conserve the Haast tokoeka kiwi bird, requiring rigorous fieldwork in steep terrain, care of eggs, chick management, predator trapping, and radio telemetry to locate adults and perform health checks.
April 2015 - September 2015
University of Saskatchewan
Position
  • Technician
Description
  • I supervised a team of four field technicians in monitoring the hibernation phenology, behaviour and reproductive success of two populations of Columbian ground squirrels in Kananaskis, Alberta.
Education
September 2016 - August 2018
September 2011 - April 2015
University of Alberta
Field of study

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Systematic literature reviews are frequently used in biodiversity conservation to identify knowledge gaps and strategies for improvement. Despite their important role, systematic reviews are not standardized and often use different methods, standards for success, and data sources. We compared two systematic reviews on terrestrial arthropod conserva...
Poster
Full-text available
An infographic explaining the methods and main findings of our paper comparing two systematic literature reviews on arthropod conservation translocations
Experiment Findings
We field-tested our predictions by using the harem polygynous Wellington tree wētā, Hemideina crassidens. We developed microsatellite markers for H. crassidens and used them to genotype females, their offspring and putative sires to estimate the opportunity for selection as well as quantify natural rates of multiple mating and its effect on male an...
Experiment Findings
We used molecular parentage assignment to quantify the reproductive success of the three alternative mating strategies in male Hemideina crassidens. Morph-specific fitnesses were then used to test the prediction that the alternative mating strategies in H. crassidens are genetic polymorphisms that are maintained at an evolutionarily stable equilibr...
Article
Full-text available
The pace-of-life syndrome hypothesis posits that personality traits (i.e. consistent individual differences in behaviour) are linked to life history and fitness. Specifically, fast-paced individuals are predicted to be proactive (i.e. active and aggressive) with an earlier age at first reproduction, a shorter life span and higher fecundity than slo...
Article
Full-text available
Alternative mating strategies are widespread among animal taxa, with strategies controlled by a genetic polymorphism (Mendelian strategy) being rarer in nature than condition-dependent developmental strategies. Mendelian strategies are predicted to have equal average fitnesses and the proportion of offspring produced by a strategy should equal the...
Article
Full-text available
Mating with multiple partners is common across animal taxa. Males mate multiply because reproductive success positively correlates with mating success. In contrast, multiple mating is expected to increase the direct (material) or indirect (genetic) benefits accrued by females but not necessarily increase their reproductive success. Cases in which f...
Data
A graphical abstract briefly explaining the context, methods and results of our study Nason and Kelly (2020) on multiple mating in Wellington tree weta.
Preprint
Full-text available
The pace of life syndrome hypothesis posits that personality traits (i.e., consistent individual differences in behaviour) are linked to life history and fitness. Specifically, fast-paced individuals are predicted to be proactive (i.e., active and aggressive) with an earlier age at first reproduction, a shorter lifespan, and a higher fecundity than...
Article
Rather than migrating, mallard ducks may choose to overwinter in northern cities on open-water thermal refuges, such as municipal wastewater treatment ponds, which in Edmonton, Canada, stay ≥10 °C during frigid winter months. Refuging mallards spend appreciable time daily on these ponds and hydrate using secondary clarified municipal wastewater (SC...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
The goal of this project was to determine whether different male morphotypes (suspected to each exhibit unique behavioural strategies for mating) of Wellington tree weta had similar fitness. A secondary goal was to determine if females benefit from mating with multiple mates, and if so, whether these benefits are similar to the benefits males receive from multiple mating (i.e., in terms of number of offpsring). A field study was used to measure fitness in a large sample of males by collecting harem groups (a male with one or more females) from tree cavities, holding females in the lab to lay eggs, then genotyping the adults and offspring to determine paternal identity. The number of offspring for each male could therefore be quantified and compared among the three morphotypes. Having genotyped the adults as well, we were able to compare the benefits of multiple mating in females versus males.