Sarah L Alderman

Sarah L Alderman
University of Guelph | UOGuelph · Department of Integrative Biology

PhD

About

53
Publications
5,081
Reads
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820
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2013 - August 2014
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2011 - September 2012
University of Waterloo
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2003 - December 2009
University of Guelph
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Hypoxia exposure during embryonic development of rainbow trout causes developmental delay and bradycardia and alters the ontogeny of cardiac regulatory control mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to characterize how hypoxia exposure from the day of fertilization until stage 34 (57 d postfertilization) affects the aerobic fitness and...
Article
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The type 2 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11βHSD2) converts active glucocorticoids to their inactive derivatives (ex. cortisol to cortisone). In most vertebrates, 11βHSD2 is essential for conferring aldosterone-specific actions in mineralocorticoid target tissues and for protecting glucocorticoid-sensitive tissues during stress. However, teleost...
Article
Full-text available
In vertebrates each of the three striated muscle types (fast skeletal, slow skeletal, and cardiac) contain distinct isoforms of a number of different contractile proteins including troponin I (TnI). The functional characteristics of these proteins have a significant influence on muscle function and contractility. The purpose of this study was to ch...
Article
Cortisol, the primary circulating corticosteroid in teleosts, is elevated during stress following activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis. Cortisol exerts genomic effects on target tissues in part by activating glucocorticoid receptors (GR). Despite a well-established negative feedback loop involved in plasma cortisol regulat...
Article
Full-text available
The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system in fish functions to maintain homeostasis during stress in part by regulating cortisol production via the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis. Towards understanding the role of the CRF system in vertebrate development, we describe the ontogeny of the CRF system, cortisol, and the stress respo...
Article
An understanding of risks associated with diluted bitumen (dilbit) transport through Pacific salmon habitat necessitates the identification and quantification of hazards posed to early life stages (ELS). Sockeye from the embryo to juvenile stage (8 month old) were exposed to 4 concentrations of the water‐soluble fraction (WSF) of Cold Lake dilbit (...
Article
Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) have decimated the Great Lakes fisheries over the past century, and their control is central to protecting native fish populations. Wounding data collected from host fish, including classifying wounds as Type A (penetrating the integument) or Type B (superficial), is an integral part of sea lamprey monitoring effor...
Article
Western painted turtles (Chrysemys picta bellii) are the most anoxia-tolerant tetrapod. Survival time improves at low temperature and during ontogeny, such that adults acclimated to 3oC survive far longer without oxygen than either warm-acclimated adults or cold-acclimated hatchlings. Since protein synthesis is rapidly suppressed to save energy at...
Preprint
Full-text available
Western painted turtles (Chrysemys picta bellii) are the most anoxia-tolerant tetrapod. Survival time improves at low temperature and during ontogeny, such that adults acclimated to 3°C survive far longer without oxygen than either warm-acclimated adults or cold-acclimated hatchlings. Since protein synthesis is rapidly suppressed to save energy at...
Article
Petrogenic chemicals are common and widespread contaminants in the aquatic environment. In Canada, increased extraction of bitumen from the oil sands and transport of the major crude oil export product, diluted bitumen (dilbit), amplifies the risk of a spill and contamination of Canadian waterways. Fish exposed to sublethal concentrations of crude...
Article
Full-text available
Canada's oil sands industry continues to expand and the volume of diluted bitumen (dilbit) transported across North America is increasing, adding to spill risk and environmental contamination. Dilbit exposure is known to cause adverse effects in fish, but linking molecular and cellular changes with ecologically-relevant individual performance metri...
Article
Full-text available
We recently described lasting changes in the cardiac proteome of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) reared under hypoxic conditions, that resemble what embryos encounter in natural nests. While these changes were consistent with functional differences in cardiac performance induced by developmental hypoxia, the magnitude of this respo...
Article
Full-text available
Hypoxic exposure during development can have a profound influence on offspring physiology, including cardiac dysfunction, yet many reptile embryos naturally experience periods of hypoxia in buried nests. American alligators experimentally exposed to developmental hypoxia demonstrate morphological and functional changes to the heart that persist int...
Article
Many animals, including zebrafish (Danio rerio), form social hierarchies through competition for limited resources. Socially subordinate fish may experience chronic stress, leading to prolonged elevation of the glucocorticoid stress hormone cortisol. As elevated cortisol levels can impair neurogenesis, the present study tested the hypothesis that s...
Article
Zebrafish is rapidly becoming a key model organism for studying a variety of biological processes from molecules to organisms. Interactions involving actin, a contractile protein and part of the cytoskeleton, are regulated by actin binding proteins in the majority of physiological processes in eukaryotic cells. To understand the contribution of act...
Article
The early life stages of Pacific salmon are at risk of environmental exposure to diluted bitumen (dilbit) as Canada's oil sands industry continues to expand. The toxicity and latent effects of dilbit exposure were assessed in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) exposed to water-soluble fractions of dilbit (WSFd) from fertilization to the swim-up st...
Article
The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system is expressed in the earliest stages of zebrafish development, long before its canonical function in the endocrine stress response is realized, and yet its function during embryogenesis is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that CRF protects embryos from stress-induced apoptosis. Here we confirm that a...
Article
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Article
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This data article presents the first description of the rainbow trout cardiac ventricle at the level of the proteome, with more than 700 proteins identified and quantified using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and LC-MS/MS. The abundances of these proteins were compared across 4 durations of moderate exercise training (...
Article
Pipelines carrying diluted bitumen (dilbit) from Canada's oil sands traverse North America, including the freshwater habitat of Pacific salmon, posing a risk of environmental release and aquatic exposure. Swimming performance is impacted in juvenile sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka) exposed to dilbit; therefore biomarkers of dilbit exposure will be valu...
Article
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![Graphic][1] What could you accomplish in just 4 h? Run a marathon, perhaps, or bake a pie? How about permanently alter the behavioral phenotype of a zebrafish? It turns out that depriving a zebrafish embryo of oxygen for just a few hours has a big impact on that fish's future. For example
Article
Biological significance: Rainbow trout hearts have a remarkable ability for molecular, structural, and functional plasticity, and the inherent athleticism of these fish makes them ideal models for studies in comparative exercise physiology. Indeed, several decades of research using exercise-trained trout has shown both conserved and unique aspects...
Article
Full-text available
![Graphic][1] It's no secret that who we are has a lot to do with our parents (genes) and how we were raised (environment). Add on a layer of biological gender, and you're sure to have a unique individual: it's fascinating to consider that much of what defines us is determined long before we'
Article
Diluted bitumen (dilbit; the product of oil sands extraction) is transported through freshwater ecosystems critical to Pacific salmon. This is concerning, as crude oil disrupts cardiac development, morphology, and function in embryonic fish, and cardiac impairment in salmon can have major consequences on migratory success and fitness. Yet the sensi...
Article
Full-text available
Oxygen supply to the heart of most teleosts, including salmonids, relies in partor inwhole on oxygen-depleted venous blood. Given that plasma-accessible carbonic anhydrase (CA) in red muscle of rainbow trout has recently been shown to facilitate oxygen unloading from arterial blood under certain physiological conditions, we tested the hypothesis th...
Article
![Graphic][1] It is often said that ‘The way to a man's heart is through his stomach’, and, although the original author of this quote is unknown, I bet he/she was an endocrinologist – someone who understood that many of the hormones that communicate the sensations of hunger and thirst
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Article
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![Figure][1] It's a boy! Or is it? We live in an era of blurred gender lines, but for many reptiles this has always been a hot topic. In crocodilian as well as several turtle species, cranking up the thermostat a few degrees during a critical developmental window, called the thermo-sensitive
Article
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![Figure][1] Glowing green brains in Petri dishes may sound like science fiction, but in Yoshitaka Oka's lab at the University of Tokyo, Japan, they are more like fine art. In a study recently published in Endocrinology , his lab used transgenics – where specific bits of DNA are added to
Article
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![][1] There's nothing like a nail-biting FIFA World Cup to remind us what anxiety feels like. Properly defined, anxiety is a behavior brought on by stress that helps us cope with potentially threatening situations. Anxiety is controlled in our brains by the neurotransmitter serotonin
Article
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![][1] From the Fountain of Youth and Shangri-La, to plastic surgery and cryogenic freezing, humans have long been obsessed with circumventing the natural process of ageing. At the cellular level, ageing occurs as the protective DNA at the ends of chromosomes – called telomeres –
Article
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Leptin is a potent anorexigen but little is known about the physiological conditions under which this cytokine regulates food intake in fish. In this study, we characterized the relationships between food intake, O2 carrying capacity, liver leptin-A1 (lep-a1) gene expression and plasma leptin-A1 in rainbow trout infected with a pathogenic hemoflage...
Article
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Outside JEB is a monthly feature that reports the most exciting developments in experimental biology. Articles that have been selected and written by a team of active research scientists highlight the papers that JEB readers can’t afford to miss.
Article
Full-text available
Keeping track of the literature isn't easy, so Outside JEB is a monthly feature that reports the most exciting developments in experimental biology. Short articles that have been selected and written by a team of active research scientists highlight the papers that JEB readers can't afford to miss.
Article
Full-text available
![][1] If you want to get hitched for life, you have to make the right moves from the start. For example, prairie voles ( Microtus ochrogaster ) form lasting pair-bonds that are initiated when a female displays special interest – known as partner preference – in a male. For the
Article
Full-text available
iv Keeping track of the literature isnʼt easy, so Outside JEB is a monthly feature that reports the most exciting developments in experimental biology. Short articles that have been selected and written by a team of active research scientists highlight the papers that JEB readers canʼt afford to miss.
Article
Full-text available
![][1] Growth and reproduction are intimately linked by the endocrine system. Pituitary growth hormone (GH) is a major driver of body growth, and modulation of its expression and secretion can be influenced by sex hormones. Despite the established relationship between growth and
Article
To further our understanding of the development of the stress axis and the responsiveness of embryonic and larval fish to environmental stressors, this study examined the ontogeny of whole-body cortisol levels and of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system in rainbow trout, as well as the endocrine and cellular stress responses to hypoxia....
Article
Full-text available
Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)- and urotensin I (UI)-expressing cells of the preoptic area (POA) and caudal neurosecretory system (CNSS) are considered key contributors to the regulation of the stress response in fish; however, the expression pattern of these neurons to environmental and social challenges have not been compared in a single st...
Article
The corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) system plays a key role in the co-ordination of the physiological response to stress in vertebrates. Although the binding protein (BP) for CRF-related peptides, CRF-BP, is an important player in the many functions of the CRF system, the distribution of CRF-BP and the impact of stressors on its expression in...
Article
Our current understanding of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system distribution in the teleost brain is restricted by limited immunohistochemical studies and a lack of complete transcriptional distribution maps. The present study used in situ hybridization to localize and compare CRF, urotensin I (UI), and CRF-binding protein (CRF-BP) exp...

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