Sarah Jessen

Sarah Jessen
Universität zu Lübeck · Klinik für Neurologie

PhD

About

34
Publications
6,016
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
801
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
When meeting other people, some are optimistic and expect to be accepted by others, whereas others are pessimistic and expect mostly rejections. How social feedback is evaluated in situations that meet or do not meet these biases and how people differ in their response to rejection and acceptance depending on the social situation are unknown. In th...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are born into a social environment and from early on possess a range of abilities to detect and respond to social cues. In the past decade, there has been a rapidly increasing interest in investigating the neural responses underlying such early social processes under naturalistic conditions. However, the investigation of neural responses to...
Preprint
Humans are born into a social environment and from early on possess a range of abilities to detect and respond to social cues. In the past decade, there has been a rapidly increasing interest in investigating the neural responses underlying such early social processes under naturalistic conditions. However, the investigation of neural responses to...
Article
Full-text available
Motivational influences on cognitive control play an important role in shaping human behavior. Cognitive facilitation through motivators such as prospective reward or punishment is thought to depend on regions from the dopaminergic mesocortical network, primarily the ventral tegmental area (VTA), inferior frontal junction (IFJ), and anterior cingul...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal odor is known to play an important role in mother-infant-interaction in many altricial species such as rodents. However, we only know very little about its role in early human development. The present study therefore investigated the impact of maternal odor on infant brain responses to emotional expression. We recorded the electroencephalo...
Article
Sensitive responding to facial information is of key importance during human social interactions. Research shows that adults glean much information from another person’s face without conscious perception, attesting to the robustness of face processing in the service of adaptive social functioning. Until recently, it was unclear whether such sublimi...
Article
Full-text available
As a highly social species, we constantly evaluate human faces to decide whether we can trust someone. Previous studies suggest that face trustworthiness can be processed unconsciously, but the underlying neural pathways remain unclear. Specifically, the question remains whether processing of face trustworthiness relies on early visual cortex (EVC)...
Preprint
Full-text available
A bstract Maternal odor is known to play an important role in mother-infant-interaction in many altricial species such as rodents. However, we only know very little about its role in early human development. The present study therefore investigated the impact of maternal odor on infant brain responses to emotional expression. We recorded the electr...
Article
Humans automatically judge a person’s trustworthiness solely based on facial features and use these judgments to inform subsequent behavior. While recent studies demonstrate that already infants are sensitive to variance in facial trustworthiness, it remains unclear whether this variance also influences subsequent socio-cognitive processes. We inve...
Article
Electroencephalography (EEG) continues to be the most popular method to investigate cognitive brain mechanisms in young children and infants. Most infant studies rely on the well-established and easy-to-use event-related brain potential (ERP). As a severe disadvantage, ERP computation requires a large number of repetitions of items from the same st...
Preprint
As a highly social species, we constantly evaluate human faces to decide whether we can trust someone. Previous studies suggest that face trustworthiness can be processed unconsciously, but the underlying neural pathways remain unclear. Specifically, the question remains whether processing of face trustworthiness relies on early visual cortex (EVC)...
Preprint
Full-text available
A bstract Electroencephalography (EEG) continues to be the most popular method to investigate cognitive brain mechanisms in young children and infants. Most infant studies rely on the well-established and easy-to-use event-related brain potential (ERP). As a severe disadvantage, ERP computation requires a large number of repetitions of items from t...
Poster
Full-text available
Abstract: "As a social and cooperative species, we often need to judge whether or not to trust someone simply by evaluating their faces. It has been suggested that this face trustworthiness can be processed unconsciously. However, empirical data supporting the existence of a neural pathway for trustworthiness processing that bypasses early visual c...
Article
Full-text available
Enhanced attention to fear expressions in adults is primarily driven by information from low as opposed to high spatial frequencies contained in faces. However, little is known about the role of spatial frequency information in emotion processing during infancy. In the present study, we examined the role of low compared to high spatial frequencies...
Article
Face evaluation is thought to play a vital role in human social interactions. One prominent aspect is the evaluation of facial signs of trustworthiness, which has been shown to occur reliably, rapidly, and without conscious awareness in adults. Recent developmental work indicates that the sensitivity to facial trustworthiness has early ontogenetic...
Article
Much research has focused on how infants respond to emotional facial expressions. One of the key findings in this area of research is that by 7 months of age, but not younger, infants show a bias in processing fearful faces even when compared with other negative and novel facial expressions. A recent study by Heck and colleagues (Journal of Experim...
Article
Face evaluation is a key aspect of face processing in humans, serving important functions in regulating social interactions. Adults and preschool children readily evaluate faces with respect to a person's trustworthiness and dominance. However, it is unclear whether face evaluation is mainly a product of extensive learning or a foundational buildin...
Article
Infants' perception of faces becomes attuned to the environment during the first year of life. However, the mechanisms that underpin perceptual narrowing for faces are only poorly understood. Considering the developmental similarities seen in perceptual narrowing for faces and speech and the role that statistical learning has been shown to play for...
Article
Full-text available
Body expressions exert strong contextual effects on facial emotion perception in adults. Specifically, conflicting body cues hamper the recognition of emotion from faces, as evident on both the behavioral and neural level. We examined the developmental origins of the neural processes involved in emotion perception across body and face in 8-month-ol...
Article
Full-text available
Rhetorical theory suggests that rhythmic and metrical features of language substantially contribute to persuading, moving, and pleasing an audience. A potential explanation of these effects is offered by "cognitive fluency theory," which stipulates that recurring patterns (e.g., meter) enhance perceptual fluency and can lead to greater aesthetic ap...
Article
From early in life, emotion detection plays an important role during social interactions. Recently, 7-month-old infants have been shown to process facial signs of fear in others without conscious perception and solely on the basis of their eyes. However, it is not known whether unconscious fear processing from eyes is present before 7months of age...
Article
Emotion perception naturally entails multisensory integration. It is also assumed that multisensory emotion perception is characterized by enhanced activation of brain areas implied in multisensory integration, such as the superior temporal gyrus and sulcus (STG/STS). However, most previous studies have employed designs and stimuli that preclude ot...
Article
Full-text available
Human eyes serve two key functions in face-to-face social interactions: they provide cues about a person’s emotional state and attentional focus (gaze direction). Both functions critically rely on the morphologically unique human sclera and have been shown to operate even in the absence of conscious awareness in adults. However, it is not known whe...
Article
Full-text available
Humans rely on multiple sensory modalities to determine the emotional state of others. In fact, such multisensory perception may be one of the mechanisms explaining the ease and efficiency by which others' emotions are recognized. But how and when exactly do the different modalities interact? One aspect in multisensory perception that has received...
Article
Full-text available
Successful social communication draws strongly on the correct interpretation of others' body and vocal expressions. Both can provide emotional information and often occur simultaneously. Yet their interplay has hardly been studied. Using electroencephalography, we investigated the temporal development underlying their neural interaction in auditory...
Article
Sentence prosody is long known to serve both linguistic functions (e.g. to differentiate between questions and statements) and emotional functions (e.g. to detect the emotional state of a speaker). These different functions of prosodic information need to be encoded rapidly during sentence comprehension to ensure successful speech communication. Ho...
Article
Full-text available
Experimental evidence suggests an impairment in emotion perception in numerous psychiatric disorders. The results to date are primarily based on research using static displays of emotional facial expressions. However, our natural environment is dynamic and multimodal, comprising input from various communication channels such as facial expressions,...
Article
Full-text available
The multimodal nature of human communication has been well established. Yet few empirical studies have systematically examined the widely held belief that this form of perception is facilitated in comparison to unimodal or bimodal perception. In the current experiment we first explored the processing of unimodally presented facial expressions. Furt...

Network

Cited By