Sarah J. Hill

Sarah J. Hill
University of New England (Australia) | UNE · School of Environmental and Rural Science

PhD

About

16
Publications
14,677
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700
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
January 2014 - present
University of New England (Australia)
Position
  • Laboratory Manager

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Urbanization transforms environments in ways that alter biological evolution. We examined whether urban environmental change drives parallel evolution by sampling 110,019 white clover plants from 6169 populations in 160 cities globally. Plants were assayed for a Mendelian antiherbivore defense that also affects tolerance to abiotic stressors. Urban...
Article
Potential impacts of soil temperatures in a post-fire environment were examined for seeds of legume species with a physical seed dormancy typically found in the eucalypt communities in eastern Australia. Soil temperatures in a post-fire environment may be elevated owing to increased solar radiation and this may influence germination of species with...
Article
Access to balanced nutrition enables optimum health and development, body repair, fat storage, increased fecundity and longevity. In the present study, we assessed the responses of a generalist leaf feeder (the phasmid Extatosoma tiaratum) reared continuously on one of three host plants, tree lucerne (Chamaecyisus palmensis), bramble (Rubus frutico...
Article
Field studies of myrmecochory (seed dispersal by ants) can benefit from the use of devitalised seeds, particularly where these studies may involve invasive plants or plants outside of their natural range. Here, we test three different methods of seed devitalisation – gamma irradiation (10.6 kGy over 9.1 h at 23.7–25.4 °C), heating (150 °C for 30 mi...
Article
The effects of anthropogenic climate change on biodiversity are well known for some high‐profile Australian marine systems, including coral bleaching and kelp forest devastation. Less well‐published are the impacts of climate change being observed in terrestrial ecosystems, although ecological models have predicted substantial changes are likely. D...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, we assess the current knowledge of the impact that climate change is having on pest management. In particular, we assess biologically based methods, such as Integrated Pest Management (IPM), with key focuses on the ecological, physiological and behavioural responses of organisms. We address six key areas: (1) the different types of...
Article
Full-text available
Biotic interactions underlie ecosystem structure and function, but predicting interaction outcomes is difficult.We tested the hypothesis that biotic interaction strength increases toward the equator, using a global experiment with model caterpillars to measure predation risk. Across an 11,660-kilometer latitudinal gradient spanning six continents,...
Article
Full-text available
To understand how researchers are tackling globally important issues, it is crucial to identify whether current research is comprehensive enough to make substantive predictions about general responses. We examined how research on climate change affecting insects is being assessed, what factors are being tested and the localities of studies, from 17...
Data
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Article
Full-text available
There is a general assumption in the literature that insect herbivory increases towards the tropics, but decreases with increasing altitude. Similar generalities have been identified along other environmental gradients, such as resource, temperature, climatic and biotic gradients. However there is growing evidence in the scientific literature that...
Article
Abstract Soil was investigated in a Cumberland Plain Woodland community to determine the presence of a soil seed-bank and whether species richness and abundance of plants germinating from it were affected by heating such as that experienced in a fire. Soil samples were taken from the Holsworthy Military Area, in the south-eastern region of the Sydn...
Article
Invasive exotic plants are a significant threat to areas of conservation value, with endangered ecological communities being especially vulnerable. We assessed the role of different anthropogenic disturbances in determining the success of exotic plants in the endangered Cumberland Plain Woodland community of western Sydney and examined the impact o...
Article
Full-text available
Exclosure plots were used to determine the effect of fire and grazing on the structure of a grassy-woodland community. Eighteen months after fire and fence treatments were applied, the species richness, cover and composition of shrubs, trees, herbs and grasses were assessed and compared to pre-treatment censuses. Unburned plots had fewer shrub spec...
Article
Full-text available
Remnants of an endangered community, Cumberland Plain Woodlands on shale, were studied in order to 1) investigate the conflict between the needs of legislation to define parameters of protected communities in a precise manner and the spatial variation in communities, and 2) to define floristic groupings in the Cumberland Plain Woodlands based on al...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The key aim of this project is to predict how key species that provide core ecosystem functions may change under thermal stress and differential resource limitation. Any changes to the biology and roles that these core species contribute (e.g. population dynamics, competition, mutualisms, metabolic rates, seed dispersal) could have substantial ramifications within an ecosystem. Ecologically important, ubiquitous and diverse organisms, such as ants, also represent ideal subjects for citizen science research. Our project will reveal how species that provide core ecosystem functions will respond to a changing climate. In most parts of Australia, ants are the dominant ecosystem function providers. We will assess ant responses to a warmer climate along five gradients across Australia.