Sarah Greenwood

Sarah Greenwood
The University of Edinburgh | UoE · Global Health Academy

PhD Ecology, BSc

About

16
Publications
4,944
Reads
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789
Citations
Citations since 2017
10 Research Items
760 Citations
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Introduction
I am a global change ecologist with a special interest in the response of forest ecosystems to climate change. My research has investigated the impacts of warming on high altitude forests and of drought on forest growth and mortality at a global-scale. My work is multi-scale and interdisciplinary, covering aspects of community ecology, biodiversity, ecosystem function and trait ecology. I use a diverse range of methods from molecular to GIS analysis.
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - September 2018
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • Fellow
September 2014 - October 2016
University of Stirling
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
To address climate change and meet global commitments, nature-based climate (NbCS) solutions i.e. actions that aim to address climate change in sustainable way, are becoming increasingly popular. This is often expressed in so called “green pledges” that promote large scale programs of tree planting, often in plantations. Establishment of such plant...
Article
Plant functional traits are broadly used to quantify and predict impacts of climate change on vegetation. However, high intraspecific trait variation can bias mean values when few measurements are available. Here, we determine the extent of individual leaf trait variation and covariation across a highly heterogeneous environmental gradient for a wi...
Article
Pollinator biodiversity loss occurs at unprecedented rates globally, with particularly sharp declines documented in the North Temperate Zone. There is currently no consensus on the main drivers of the decline. Although climate change is expected to drive biodiversity loss in the future, current warming is often suggested to have positive impacts on...
Article
Pollinator biodiversity and biomass are in decline globally. This fact accompanied by shortage and collapses of domesticated pollinator colonies, puts human food security under unprecedented threat. Many countries worldwide have adopted or intend to introduce national pollinator conservation strategies. Decisions of policy makers and other involved...
Article
Full-text available
Reintroductions of top predators are crucial for restoring ecosystems and are a central tenet of rewilding efforts. In recent years, top predators such as the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) have increased in numbers and expanded into their former range across Europe. A proposal for conducting a trial reintroduction of the Eurasian lynx in England has re...
Article
Full-text available
With habitat loss and fragmentation among the greatest threats to biodiversity, a better understanding of the habitat use of keystone species is critical in any conservation management strategy. Aldabra Atoll, in the Seychelles archipelago, has the largest population worldwide of giant tortoises. This endemic species (Aldabrachelys gigantea) could...
Article
Intense droughts combined with increased temperatures are one of the major threats to forest persistence in the 21(st) century. Despite the direct impact of climate change on forest growth and shifts in species abundance, the effect of altered demography on changes in the composition of functional traits is not well known. We sought to: (1) quantif...
Article
Drought events are increasing globally, and reports of consequent forest mortality are widespread. However, due to a lack of a quantitative global synthesis, it is still not clear whether drought-induced mortality rates differ among global biomes and whether functional traits influence the risk of drought-induced mortality. To address these uncerta...
Article
Ongoing climate change poses significant threats to plant function and distribution. Increased temperatures and altered precipitation regimes amplify drought frequency and intensity, elevating plant stress and mortality. Large-scale forest mortality events will have far-reaching impacts on carbon and hydrological cycling, biodiversity, and ecosyste...
Book
Full-text available
Natura 2000 is the core pillar in the European Union’s (EU) biodiversity conservation policy. It is an EU-wide ecological network of protected areas that cuts across countries’ borders, administrative levels, policy sectors and socio-economic contexts. The network is established and managed according to the legally-binding provisions of the 1979 EU...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is causing shifts in the range of species worldwide. In high-altitude areas forests are often observed to be shifting their upper limits to higher altitudes in response to warming temperatures. Although this phenomenon is well described, the possible consequences of this for the wider forest community have not been fully considered....
Article
An advance of high-altitude treelines has been reported in response to warming climate throughout the globe. Understanding local controls on the establishment of seedlings above the treeline is essential for predicting wider patterns of treeline response from a process-based perspective. Here we investigate patterns of seedling establishment in rel...
Article
Full-text available
Treeline advance is reported as a widespread response to rising temperatures, yet few studies have considered the impact of treeline advance on the diversity and function of high altitude systems. Evidence suggests that climate change is already having a negative impact on alpine diversity and is modifying functions such as carbon sequestration and...
Article
Altitudinal treelines are typically temperature limited such that increasing temperatures linked to global climate change are causing upslope shifts of treelines worldwide. While such elevational increases are readily predicted based on shifting isotherms, at the regional level the realised response is often much more complex, with topography and l...
Article
Full-text available
Restoration of moors dominated by Calluna vulgaris is carried out for conservation and sporting reasons. Previous research has shown variable restoration success in the early years of restoration management. In this study we investigated whether restored heather moorland vegetation increasingly resembles long-established moorland vegetation over a...

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