Sarah W. Garnick

Sarah W. Garnick
University of Melbourne | MSD · School of BioSciences

PhD Zoology

About

11
Publications
1,054
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
148
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2008 - January 2014
University of Melbourne
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
The red-necked wallaby (Notamacropus rufogriseus) has a broad geographic range along the eastern seaboard of Australia, but ecological research on the mainland subspecies has been limited. We aimed to assess long-term monitoring (1974 to 2017) of abundance at a site in the Grampians National Park in Victoria. Our second aim was to evaluate trap suc...
Article
Mammalian herbivores are typically infected by parasitic nematodes, which are acquired through direct, faecal–oral transmission. These parasites can cause significant production losses in domestic livestock, but much less is known about impacts on wild mammalian hosts. We review three elements of parasitism from the host's perspective: fitness cost...
Article
The Jarman–Bell principle seeks to explain why smaller herbivore species tend to select higher-quality forage (high protein and high fiber digestibility) than larger herbivore species. This principle may also provide insight into intraspecific differences in resource use in species with pronounced sexual size dimorphism. We examined the relationshi...
Article
Full-text available
Researchers and managers need effective tools for monitoring the use of forages by large herbivores. Since 2000, the number of herbivore diet studies has nearly doubled. In this review, we determine trends in the field; assess the utility of key techniques against five criteria (cost, accuracy and precision, resolution, utility for long-term monito...
Article
Many theories attempt to explain patterns of community organisation among large herbivores. We explored the role of body size, diet type and residence time on habitat use in a community comprising four metatherians (western grey kangaroo, Macropus fuliginosus; eastern grey kangaroo, M. giganteus; red-necked wallaby, Notamacropus rufogriseus; swamp...
Article
Full-text available
Specialist species show stronger resource selection, narrower niches and lower niche overlap than generalist species. We examined ecological specialisation with respect to habitat selection in a macropodid community comprising the western grey kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus, red-necked wallaby M. rufogriseus and swamp wallaby Wallabia bicolor in the...
Article
Full-text available
Foraging herbivores face twin threats of predation and parasite infection, but the risk of predation has received much more attention. We evaluated, experimentally, the role of olfactory cues in predator and parasite risk assessment on the foraging behaviour of a population of marked, free-ranging, red-necked wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus). The w...
Article
Body size affects key life-history parameters including dietary requirements and predation risk. We examined these effects on diel habitat use in a community of three sexually-dimorphic macropodid marsupial species: western grey kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus, red-necked wallaby M. rufogriseus and swamp wallaby Wallabia bicolor. In particular, our s...
Article
Full-text available
Large mammalian herbivores must balance foraging efficiency with multiple constraints, including the risk of gastrointestinal parasitism. The costs imposed by gastrointestinal parasites are likely to exert selective pressure on hosts to develop aversion behaviors. Fecal aversion, or the avoidance of foraging patches contaminated by feces, is one me...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
For my PhD, I investigated habitat and diet use in eastern and western grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus and M. fuliginosus), red-necked wallabies (M. rufogriseus) and swamp wallabies (Wallabia bicolor) in the Grampians National Park, Victoria, Australia.