Sarah Eiteljoerge

Sarah Eiteljoerge
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen | GAUG · Language Acquisition Group

PhD

About

9
Publications
1,046
Reads
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19
Citations
Citations since 2017
9 Research Items
19 Citations
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Introduction
I am a Postdoc in the Psychology of Language research group in Göttingen. My research combines early word and action learning by investigating cross-domain influences. I am also interested in experimental pragmatics, and swing dancing.
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - present
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2014 - September 2015
University College London
Field of study
  • Language Sciences (specialisation in Language Development)
October 2011 - September 2014
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Field of study
  • General linguistics

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Full-text available
Until at least 4 years of age, children, unlike adults, interpret some as compatible with all. The inability to draw the pragmatic inference leading to interpret some as not all, could be taken to indicate a delay in pragmatic abilities, despite evidence of other early pragmatic skills. However, little is known about how the production of these imp...
Article
Full-text available
Communication with young children is often multimodal in nature, involving, for example, language and actions. The simultaneous presentation of information from both domains may boost language learning by highlighting the connection between an object and a word, owing to temporal overlap in the presentation of multimodal input. However, the overlap...
Article
Full-text available
Successful communication often involves comprehension of both spoken language and observed actions with and without objects. Even very young infants can learn associations between actions and objects as well as between words and objects. However, in daily life, children are usually confronted with both kinds of input simultaneously. Choosing the cr...
Preprint
Children live in a multimodal world: For example, communication with young children not only includes information from the auditory linguistic modality in the form of speech but also from the visual modality in the form of actions that caregivers use in the interaction with children. Dynamic systems approaches suggest that multimodal input can help...
Preprint
A preprint can be found on osf: https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/B7FMT Successful communication often involves comprehension of both spoken language and observed actions with and without objects. Even very young infants can learn associations between actions and objects as well as between words and objects. However, in daily life, children are usua...
Preprint
Successful communication often involves comprehension of both spoken language and observed actions. Filtering out relevant information in such multimodal situations might help children structure the input, and thereby, allow for successful learning. In the current study, we investigated the developmental time-course of children’s word and action le...
Preprint
When infants and caregivers interact with each other, a lot of information in the language and the action domain is shared between them. Past research shows that from the first year of life, infants' abilities to process language and action information develop significantly. However, a lot of the research focussed on the language and the action dom...
Preprint
Communication with young children is often multimodal in nature, involving, for example, language and actions. This multimodal input supports language learning when it highlights the connection of word and object. But multimodal input can also guide the child’s attention away from the language input, and thus, exacerbate learning. In the current st...

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