Sarah de Leeuw

Sarah de Leeuw
University of Northern British Columbia · Northern Medical Program

PhD

About

84
Publications
25,424
Reads
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1,710
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2008 - present
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • Associate Affiliate Professor
July 2008 - present
University of Northern British Columbia
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
May 2007 - May 2008
The University of Arizona
Position
  • Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow

Publications

Publications (84)
Article
Anchored in critical analysis of a photovoice project, this article interrogates intersections between (1) health as it is tethered to ideas about the “future” and (2) worries about “the environment.” The ways the concepts of future, health and environment are dealt with by project participants suggest that arts-based research methods may be at ris...
Article
Full-text available
Well-documented disparities in health status persist between Indigenous and non- Indigenous people in Canada. Medical schools have a responsibility to address underlying causes of these inequities, in part by developing future physicians’ cultural humility and their capacities in cultural safety by increasing critical anti- racism knowledge and und...
Article
Full-text available
Rural, remote, northern, and Indigenous communities on Turtle Island are routinely-as Cree Elder Willie Ermine says-pathologized. Social science and health scholarship, including scholarship by geographers, often constructs Indigenous human and physical geographies as unhealthy, diseased, vulnerable, and undergoing extraction. These constructions a...
Chapter
Geopoetics is a slippery‐flippery concept, one that jumps about and slyly avoids getting captured in definitive ways. The elusive somewhat tricky and sneaky nature of geopoetics is exactly the nature of the concept's productive potential, the source of its potential radicalism and exactly why radical critical geographers might want to embrace it. G...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, both within and beyond academic and clinical spheres, medical and health humanities have become increasingly influential. Drawing from interdisciplinary fields in the humanities, social sciences, and the arts, medical and health humanities present unique lenses for considering nuanced spaces and lived experiences of health and heal...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Suggested Citation: Ecological Determinants Group on Education (2018) Ecological Determinants of Health in Public Health Education in Canada: A Scan of Needs, Challenges and Assets. Parkes M.W., Poland, B (Lead Authors); Allison S, Cole, D., Culbert I., de Leeuw S., Gislason M., Hancock T., Howard C., Koropeski, J., La Prairie, A., Greenwood, M., P...
Article
Full-text available
Geographers have long reflected on our discipline's colonial history. Both Indigenous and non‐Indigenous geographers have discussed ways of engaging Indigenous geographies and sought new ways of opening and expanding spaces for Indigenous peoples and Indigenous ways of knowing and being in our discipline. Like many social scientists, geographers na...
Article
Mental health service users (MHSUs) have elevated rates of cardiometabolic disturbance. Improvements occur with physical activity (PA) programs. We report the development and evaluation of three innovative peer-developed and peer-led PA programs: 1) walking; 2) fitness; and 3) yoga. Qualitative evaluation with 33 MHSUs in British Columbia, Canada,...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is anchored in two recent and concurrent openings, openings that offer opportunities for geographers to consider new modes of engaging colonial violence. The first opening is the release, in Canada, of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's final report and calls to action. By demanding new types of settler-subject attention to Indige...
Article
Despite the recent Truth and Reconciliation Report in Canada, rates of Indigenous children being apprehended by the state remain disproportionality high when compared to non-Indigenous children. Starting with a critical decolonizing methodology, this article charts connections between historic and contemporary settler-colonial state interventions i...
Article
We are two feminist geographers working as practitioners and researchers in creative geographies and the discipline’s creative re/turn. Human geographers interested in new representational and non-representational methods and methodologies are, as we explore in this article, increasingly turning to artistic and creative modes of expression, includi...
Article
Full-text available
Geography and the medical-health sciences have long histories of engaging the humanities. The last decade has seen for both disciplines a significant growth in theoretical frameworks, pedagogic strategies, and research methods that draw upon visual and literary arts, critical self-reflection, creative tools and expressions, and even direct engageme...
Chapter
This chapter considers the specific role of young Indigenous peoples within historic colonial and neocolonial efforts of building and maintaining nation-states. Although these efforts have unfolded around the world, theoretical discussions in the chapter are grounded in specific examples from Canada, with some reference to New Zealand (Aotearoa), A...
Article
There are a variety of barriers to eye-care service access in rural Northern First Nations communities. Semi-structured, opened-ended key informant interviews were conducted on the topic of eye care, with eight First Nations individuals employed by the health office in a small Northern British Columbian First Nations community. Data analysis compri...
Book
The health disparities affecting Indigenous peoples in Canada might well be understood as a national epidemic. Although progress has been made in the last decade towards both understanding and ameliorating Indigenous health inequalities, very little research or writing has expanded a social determinants of health framework to account for the unique...
Chapter
This chapter considers the specific role of young Indigenous peoples within historic colonial and neocolonial efforts of building and maintaining nation-states. Although these efforts have unfolded around the world, theoretical discussions in the chapter are grounded in specific examples from Canada, with some reference to New Zealand (Aotearoa), A...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Mental health service users experience high rates of cardiometabolic disorders and have a 20-25% shorter life expectancy than the general population from such disorders. Clinician-led health behavior programs have shown moderate improvements, for mental health service users, in managing aspects of cardiometabolic disorders. This study s...
Article
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Article
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This is a paper about child-welfare regulations, policies, and practices as they impact Indigenous families and communities. I take as my starting point that child welfare, and geographies of Indigenous homes and families, are under-scrutinized ontologies worthy of more investigation especially by geographers interested in understanding neo settler...
Article
Full-text available
We are unequivocally in favor of much, much, more space opening up for Aboriginal peoples and Indigenous ways of knowing and being in academic (and myriad other) spaces. We are worried, however, about a current lack of published critical engagement with policies and practices that appear, superficially, to support inclusivity and diversity of Indig...
Article
Full-text available
Health disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples persist globally. Northern interior British Columbia, where many Indigenous people live on Indian reserves allocated in the late nineteenth century, is no exception. This article reviews findings from fifty-eight interviews with members of thirteen First Nations communities in Carrier...
Article
Full-text available
Aboriginal children's well-being is vital to the health and success of our future nations. Addressing persistent and current Aboriginal health inequities requires considering both the contexts in which disparities exist and innovative and culturally appropriate means of rectifying those inequities. The present article contextualizes Aboriginal chil...
Article
Geographic engagement with Indigenous peoples remains inextricably linked to colonialism. Consequently, studying Indigenous geographies is fraught with ethical and political dilemmas. Participatory and community-based research methods have recently been offered as one solution to address concerns about the politics of gathering, framing, producing,...
Chapter
Theorizing DifferencePutting Difference in Its Place: How Geographers Deal with DifferenceToward a Different DifferenceConcluding DifferencesReferences
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter argues that the health and wellbeing of Indigenous children, their communities, and ultimately their nations, arises from connection with the land and from cultural strengths linked with this connectivity. We provide critical reflection on contemporary discussions about impacts that climate change will have on the social, ecological, c...
Article
Hegemony is a preferred mode of governance. Because it relies more heavily on consent than on coercion, it tends to produce a more willing, and less resistant, citizenry. By its nature, hegemony depends crucially upon a widely shared, common-sensical view that elites are acting in the interests of those being governed, and this common sense underpi...
Article
Full-text available
Available online at: https://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=22894. This paper argues that the health and wellbeing of Indigenous children, their communities, and ultimately their nations, arises from connection with the land and from cultural strengths linked with this connectivity. We provide critical reflection on con...
Article
Full-text available
Our Aboriginal relations When family doctors and Aboriginal patients meet
Article
Full-text available
Although not fully conceptualized as such by geographers, children and concepts of childhood were focal points of colonialism. Well into the twentieth century, Aboriginal peoples in Canada were discursively constructed by colonists as child-like subjects in need of colonial intervention in order that they ‘grow up’ into de-Indigenized Canadian citi...
Article
Full-text available
Colonial projects in Canada have a long history of violently intervening into the personal lives and social structures of Indigenous peoples. These interventions are associated with elevated rates of addictions and mental health issues among Indigenous peoples. In this paper we employ an indigenized social determinants approach to mental health and...
Article
Tania Murray Li est anthropologue, professeur titulaire de la chaire d'économie politique et de culture asiatique et pacifique à l'Université de Toronto. C'est une chercheuse de terrain, ayant passé beaucoup de temps en Indonésie. Son observation de chercheur engagé auprès de différents villages lui a donné l'occasion de voir la mise en ½uvre de pl...
Article
Full-text available
This article critically engages the politics of inclusivity by exploring the respective advantages and disadvantages faced by Indigenous peoples as (predominantly non-Indigenous) academic institutions come to recognize the merits of Indigenous knowledges and world views. Written in part from lived and personal experiences, we argue three specific p...
Article
Public Health Agency of Canada, Aboriginal Head Start Urban and Northern Communities Program
Article
The theoretical premise of this paper is that place is an unbounded material, social and cultural agent within and through which practices of colonialism were enacted in British Columbia. Specifically, the places of British Columbia's 'Indian' residential schools, and the subjects who occupied them, are conceptualized as intimate sites nested withi...
Article
Full-text available
The premise of this article is that Aboriginal children in Canada cannot be extricated from Canada's colonial and colonizing history, nor can they be disentangled from the current socioeconomic conditions that dictate the everyday realities of Aboriginal people. The authors argue that Aboriginal early childhood is a site of politicized potential fo...
Article
Full-text available
In this article we discuss the interconnectivity of Indigenous people, their cultures, and ways of life with the land and the idea that the health and well-being of Indigenous children, their communities, and ultimately their Nations arise from their connection with the land and from a strength of culture that grows from this connectivity. We argue...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Mental health service users (MHSUs) experience health inequities, high rates of cancer risk, incidence, cancer-related mortality and multiple barriers to health (Graham et al., 2013; 2014). Incidence of all cancers among MHSUs has been shown to be 17% and 29% higher for individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, respectively (Lin et al., 2013). Although MHSUs have increased exposure to cancer risk factors such as smoking, poorer nutrition and inactivity which may account for higher rates of cancer onset, they receive suboptimal cancer care across the care continuum. Higher rates of cancer mortality in this disadvantaged population can be attributed to inequities in accessing and receiving primary care and specialist cancer care. The reasons for this disparity have yet to be explored in depth. Given the lack of research in this area there are gaps in our understanding of experiences of cancer care for individuals with severe mental illness. The current research will build on our previous community-based work with MHSUs and will generate new knowledge to extend our understanding of the barriers and inequities that underlie poorer cancer outcomes in this population.