Sarah Bourdeau

Sarah Bourdeau
Université du Québec à Montréal | UQAM · Department of Psychology

Doctor of Psychology

About

23
Publications
18,007
Reads
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88
Citations
Additional affiliations
February 2017 - May 2017
Université du Québec à Montréal
Position
  • Research Assistant
April 2016 - December 2016
Université du Québec à Montréal
Position
  • Research Assistant
September 2014 - August 2016
Université du Québec à Montréal
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2014 - April 2020
Université du Québec à Montréal
Field of study
  • Psychology
January 2011 - April 2014
Université du Québec à Montréal
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
[Sarah Bourdeau and Ariane Ollier-Malaterre contributed equally to this article and share first authorship.] Many employees hesitate to use work-life policies (e.g., flexible work arrangements, leaves, on-site services) for fear of career consequences. However, findings on the actual career consequences of such use are mixed. We de-bundle work-life...
Article
Full-text available
The work-family interface can be examined in terms of conflict or enrichment. The majority of previous studies have focused on the determinants and consequences of work-family conflict. However, a more complete picture of the situation requires an examination of how work and family roles can mutually enrich each other. Until now, scholars did not h...
Article
Full-text available
Work-life balance is an important issue in today’s world and the different strategies used by people to manage their work and their personal life can have a great impact. Two studies were conducted (study 1: n = 117; study 2: n = 293) to examine how boundary segmentation preferences (studies 1 & 2) and boundary integration strategies (study 2) affe...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores the relationships between passion for work and work–family conflicts (WFC). Using a multidimensional perspective of WFC, 2 studies (Study 1 = 91 civil servants; Study 2 = 679 teachers) tested a model in which passion for work predicted psychological distress through 4 types of WFC. In Study 1, results revealed that harmonious...
Article
Full-text available
The Dualistic Model of Passion (DMP) proposes two types of passion, namely harmonious passion and obsessive passion. The DMP posits that the activity becomes part of one’s identity. However, little research assessed how the two types of passion relate to identity. Two important facets of identity hypothesized to be associated with passion are ident...
Chapter
This chapter reviews theories and perspectives, such as role theory, the life course perspective, and the resource perspective, pertaining to retirement and how passion for work relates to the main theoretical background used to study retirement. An extensive review of the research that has examined the role of passion for work in retirees’ psychol...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on the prevalent model of passion, namely the dualistic model of passion. This model defines passion as a strong inclination toward an activity that people love, value, engage in on a regular basis and is part of identity. Further, the dualistic model of passion posits the existence of two distinct types of passion leading to o...
Article
This research investigates how group members subjectively feel about their prosocial vs. harmful intergroup behaviors, and whether these behaviors can represent who they are more globally as a person. Three experiments tested how group norms (pro-merit/parity vs. pro-discrimination) and congruence with these norms predicted compartmentalization of...
Poster
Full-text available
Some workers may see their work as pure labour, a way to pay bills and to make ends meet, though others love their jobs and see it as part of their identity (Vallerand & Houlfort, 2003): their work is a passion (Vallerand, Houlfort, & Forest, 2015). Even if passion is usually seen as a good thing for many, there are two sides to the story (Houlfort...
Poster
Full-text available
Roles at work and at home have changed significantly in the last decades, which has led to a growing interest in how people manage to take on multiples roles (e.g., Barnett & Hyde, 2001; Edwards & Rothbard, 2000; Greenhaus & Parasuraman, 1999). The ever-growing technology has also contributed to enhance the permeability of the boundaries between th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In today’s society, work is highly valued, and can become a passion for many individuals (Vallerand & Houlfort, 2003). The Dualistic Model of Passion (Vallerand et al., 2003) states that passion can be harmonious (HP), associated with more positive outcomes, or obsessive (OP), associated with more negative outcomes. Two studies were conducted (n =...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This was a 3-minutes presentation. For full details, see the article : Leduc, C., Houlfort, N. & Bourdeau, S. (2016). Work-Life Balance: The Good and the Bad of Boundary Management. International Journal of Psychological Studies, 8(1), 133-146. Work-life balance is an important issue in today’s world and the different strategies used by people to...
Poster
Full-text available
Work takes a lot of place in ones’ life, and can be associated with great stress. Social support has been repeatedly associated with the reduction of work-induced stress (Gore, 1987; Thomas & Ganster, 1995). Furthermore, the importance of work in ones’ life and identity can lead to passion for work (Vallerand & Houlfort, 2003). Passion, when harmon...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Dualistic Model of Passion (DMP; Vallerand et al., 2003) proposes two types of passion, namely harmonious passion (HP; where one has control over the activity that one loves) and obsessive passion (OP; where one is being controlled by the activity). The DMP posits that the activity becomes part of one’s identity. However, little research assess...
Poster
Full-text available
L’interface travail-famille peut être examinée sous l’angle du conflit (CTF; Carlson et al., 2000), mais pour obtenir un portrait plus complet de la situation, l’angle de l’enrichissement – travail pouvant enrichir la vie personnelle et vice-versa – (ETF; Carlson et al., 2006) doit aussi être pris en compte. Jusqu’à maintenant les chercheurs ne dis...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
For some individuals, work can become a passion. Teachers are devoted to transferring knowledge and protecting the public education system, lawyers are passionate for the cause they defend. Passionate workers will invest significant time and energy defending their cause, but will they still have time and energy to invest in their family? A series o...
Poster
Full-text available
Social support has been repeatedly associated with a better work-life balance (Kossek et al., 2011). However, few studies have concomitantly examined different sources of support (colleagues, supervisor and romantic partner), and fewer studies have examined the underlying mechanism of this relationship. Two cross-sectional studies (n = 100; n = 222...
Poster
Full-text available
Comment un individu arrive-il à émettre des actes discriminatoires de telle sorte qu’ils sont émis par choix et deviennent intériorisés? Alors que les normes sociales de nos groupes influencent leur intériorisation et endossement autodéterminé (Amiot & al., 2013), il reste à déterminer quels processus peuvent faciliter cette intériorisation. Le fai...
Poster
Full-text available
Cette étude s’est intéressée aux processus favorisant l’émission et l’intériorisation de comportements discriminatoires. Il a été démontré que les normes sociales prônées par les groupes auxquels nous nous identifions influencent l’émission et l’endossement autodéterminé de ces comportements (Amiot & al., 2013). Il reste par contre à déterminer les...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
I would like to assess the fear of stigma employees could have for using work-life balance policies (regarding the flexibility stigma; e.g. Williams, Blair-Loy et Berdahl, 2013). Does anyone know of a scale or way of measuring this ?
Thank you in advance !
Question
More specifically, I'm trying to understand how the interaction of injunctive and descriptive social norms can help predict if employees will use work-family policies in their workplace. I'm looking for research regarding social norms, stigma (the flexibility stigma at work) and work-family balance. Any research related to those variables would be highly appreciated! Thanks in advance for your help.

Network

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
I act as a co-resarcher in the Ergonomics/Communication team of this interdisciplinary project. We are looking at work/family individual and collective strategies related to precarious employment and, notably atypical schedules. We use an ecosystemic framework to analyse how the influence mechanisms of these strategies at the regulatory, organizational, interpersonal and individual levels.