Sara Perry

Sara Perry
Museum of London Archaeology

PhD

About

38
Publications
11,801
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429
Citations

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
The agenda for an engaged and impactful archaeology has been set out emphatically in a variety of recent reports, positioning archaeology and heritage as important sources of public value and social benefit. While many ascribe to these aims, how to put them into practice in concrete terms remains a real challenge. Tools, methods and methodologies d...
Article
Full-text available
Virtual reality (VR) technologies have become more and more affordable and popular in the last five years thanks to hardware and software advancements. A critical issue for these technologies is finding paradigms that allow user interactions in ways that are as similar as possible to the real world, bringing physicality into the experience. Current...
Article
Full-text available
Visits to cultural heritage sites are generally social in nature, yet resources to support these sociable experiences are often individualized, catering to the solitary visitor. Digital technologies offer means to disrupt this predicament, encouraging social engagements in cultural contexts. Here we present the results of a user study that systemat...
Chapter
Full-text available
While preconceptions of archaeology and cultural heritage are generally formed at a young age through exposures to mass media and teachings in formal and informal settings, the quality of these exposures is extremely variable and often fails to engage young people in meaningful ways. Although digital technologies may appear as tempting means to int...
Article
Full-text available
Empirical studies increasingly testify to the capacity for archaeological and cultural heritage sites to engender wonder, transformation, attachment, and community bonding among diverse individuals. Following political theorist Jane Bennett, these sites have the power to ‘enchant’ and, in so doing, they are seedbeds of human generosity, ethical min...
Article
Full-text available
While the epistemological affordances and varied impacts of different media on archaeological knowledge production have been scrutinized by many practitioners in recent decades, sources of digital structured data (e.g., spreadsheets, traditional relational databases, content management systems) have seen far less critical enquiry. Structured digita...
Chapter
Full-text available
A growing body of research testifies to the capacity for archaeological and other cultural heritage sites to generate wonder, attachment, personal transformation and restoration, family bonding and community building amongst their visitors. Using evaluation data from two related European Commission‐funded research projects, CHESS and EMOTIVE, we di...
Chapter
Full-text available
Digital storytelling in cultural heritage contexts has been recognized as a direction that cultural heritage institutions, including museums and historical sites, need to invest in to attract and engage their audiences. The term-interactive storytelling‖ is often used to characterize existing digital applications, whether these incorporate narrativ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Can a chatbot enable us to change our conceptions, to be critically reflective? To what extent can interaction with a technologically “minimal” medium such as a chatbot evoke emotional engagement in ways that can challenge us to act on the world? In this paper, we discuss the design of a provocative bot, a “bot of conviction”, aimed at triggering c...
Chapter
Full-text available
Although archaeologists are increasingly critically engaged in their deployment of computational approaches, those who label themselves as ‘digital archaeologists’ are typically not recognised for their philosophical contributions to the discipline and are rarely positioned at the forefront of general disciplinary theorising. Indeed, where digital...
Article
Full-text available
'Heritage interpretation' is generally conceived as the development and presentation of knowledge about the past for public audiences. Most obviously evidenced in descriptive signs, guides and related media installed on archaeological and cultural sites, heritage interpretation has more than a half-century of theory and applied practice behind it,...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we firstly critique the state of the art on Virtual Museums (VM) in an effort to expose the many opportunities available to enroll these spaces into transformative and engaging cultural experiences. We then outline our attempts to stretch beyond the usual VM in order to connect it to visitors in a measurably emotional, participatory,...
Article
Full-text available
The birth of archaeologically themed television programmes is intimately linked to the birth of television itself. Yet little is known of the earliest broadcasts owing to both the fragmentary archival record and the longstanding hype surrounding later archaeology TV productions. This article examines two of the first such shows, likely the earliest...
Article
Are you an avid fan of Instagramed excavation finds, or YouTube clips of archaeologists? Ever visited an archaeologically-themed virtual museum? Or have you taken a tour of a historic site with a mobile app as your guide? Have you searched for the best Minecraft games deployed in the name of heritage? Or are you regularly on the lookout for blogs t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The museum visit is a collaborative activity: people typically visit museums in social groups, and conversation between group members has been highlighted as a key aspect for an engaging visitor experience. In this work, we detail initial findings and experience results from the design and evaluation of a group-based digital storytelling journey, w...
Article
While blogging in archaeology has a genealogy that can be traced back nearly two decades, the relationship between such practice and the constitution of disciplinary expertise has barely been probed. Arguably directly relatable to early web-based efforts to reconfigure the archaeological interpretative process and redefine professional identity (e....
Article
Full-text available
Weaving together the theoretical and methodological assets of the fields of archaeology and media archaeology, this paper presents the first phase of the Media Archaeology Drive Project (MAD-P) wherein we aim to articulate a formal procedure for the excavation of media objects. Using an abandoned hard drive as our case study, we introduce our appro...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Digital storytelling is one resource museums have in hand for enriching their offer to audiences and society at large. But how is the museum to author digital storytelling experiences that cater to various needs while maintaining scientific integrity? In this paper, we report on a series of experiences involving the creation of several interactive...
Article
Full-text available
From blogs to crowdfunding, YouTube to LinkedIn, online photo-sharing sites to open-source community-based software projects, the social web has been a meaningful player in the development of archaeological practice for two decades now. Yet despite its myriad applications, it is still often appreciated as little more than a tool for communication,...
Article
Decades of Internet study have arguably done little to shed light on the nature and implications of web-based communications in archaeology. Since the late 1990s, the online world has been lauded by archaeologists for its capacities to engender dialogue, participation, intellectual change and even democratic revolution. Yet the dangers associated w...
Article
Alan Sorrell is best known today as a ‘reconstruction artist’, employed between the 1930s and the 1970s by the Ministry of Works and other bodies to produce reconstructions of ancient monuments and re-creations of ancient life. The archive containing many of his papers, working drawings, correspondence and other material was temporarily loaned to t...
Article
William Matthew Flinders Petrie (1853-1942) was a legendary figure in the histories of archaeology and anthropology, recognised for his discipline-building efforts and his contributions to various intellectual paradigms including eugenics and anthropometry. Of lesser renown, however, is the donation of his own head to the collections of the Royal C...
Article
Full-text available
As the UCL Institute of Archaeology celebrates its 75th anniversary, it has begun to probe its role in the development of professional archaeology more seriously, a role illustrated (aptly) by the importance of photography and photographs at the Institute. This short article will explore two facets of the Institute’s relationship with photography –...
Thesis
Archaeologists have long scrutinised the relationship of images to disciplinary knowledge creation. However, to date, very little attention has been given to archaeological visual media and visual methods as generative tools. Visualisations work to make things possible—income, infrastructure, status, security, ideas and expertise—and their shrewd a...
Article
Rooted in anthropologists' long-standing roles as producers, users, and disseminators of images, this brief article takes the pulse of ethical considerations related to visual media in the discipline. Reflecting on the intent, content, and implications of the Society for Visual Anthropology–sponsored visual ethics discussion sessions at the 2007–9...
Article
As new media technologies increasingly populate our toolkits, questions arise about whether archaeologists are yet even competent users of orthodox media. Prior to engaging with emerging tools, this paper takes one step back to probe the subtexts of traditional two-dimensional archaeological images. Of interest is whether the many implications of t...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Interactive, personalised digital stories for museums and heritage sites (www.emotiveproject.eu)