Sara Kuebbing

Sara Kuebbing
Yale University | YU · Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

Ph.D.

About

49
Publications
10,527
Reads
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1,008
Citations
Introduction
I am a plant ecologist studying biological invasions and their impacts on native plant communities and ecosystems. I research the impacts and interactions among co-occurring invasive plant species and how these impacts might differ from invasions by single invasive plants. I also work to increase public awareness of invasive species and to promote better state and federal policies to prevent the spread and impact of current and future invaders.
Additional affiliations
August 2009 - May 2014
University of Tennessee
Position
  • PhD Student
February 2009 - August 2009
Lewis Creek Association
Position
  • Coordinator, European Frogbit Pilot Removal Program
Description
  • Developed invasive plant management plan for lacustrine wetland. Hired and supervised field assistants and volunteers, Created and disseminated educational materials and presentations.
January 2007 - June 2008
The Nature Conservancy
Position
  • Program Manager, Invasive Plant Outreach
Description
  • Managed National Fish and Wildlife Foundation "Pulling Together Initiative" Grant Award. Developed and coordinated invasive plant education program for resource managers and home gardeners. Led local Weed Management Area.

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
Field research can be an important component of the career trajectories for researchers in numerous academic fields; however, conducting research in field settings poses risks to health and safety, and researchers from marginalized groups often face greater risks than those experienced by other researchers in their fields; If these additional risks...
Article
Full-text available
The practice of writing science blogs benefits both the scientist and society alike by providing professional development opportunities and delivering information in a format that is accessible to large and diverse audiences. By designing a project that introduced upper‐level undergraduate students to science blog writing with a focus on plant biol...
Article
Ericoid mycorrhizal (ErM) shrubs commonly occur in forest understories and could therefore alter arbuscular (AM) and/or ectomycorrhizal (EcM) tree effects on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. Specifically, ErM fungi have extensive organic matter decay capabilities, and ErM plant and fungal tissues have high concentrations of secondary compounds th...
Article
Full-text available
Facilitation by nurse plants shapes community development during primary succession. Human activity—especially in urban settings—has created environments like abandoned lots or post-industrial waste sites in which primary succession occurs. The importance of facilitation in these stressful urban habitats is likely pronounced. There is evidence that...
Article
Full-text available
Context The relationship between native and non-native species richness is influenced by drivers including disturbance history and environmental character. Disturbance influences native-exotic richness relationships (NERRs) and results in positive or negative relationships, depending on its intensity. Land-use history can be used to understand how...
Article
Full-text available
Community science image libraries offer a massive, but largely untapped, source of observational data for phenological research. The iNaturalist platform offers a particularly rich archive, containing more than 49 million verifiable, georeferenced, open access images, encompassing seven continents and over 278,000 species. A critical limitation pre...
Article
Difficulties quantifying pathogen load and mutualist abundance limit our ability to connect disease dynamics to host community ecology. For example, specific predictions about how differential pathogen load is hypothesized to drive host competitive outcomes are rarely tested. Additionally, although infection is known to affect mutualists, we rarely...
Article
Full-text available
The editorial board of this journal, Biological Invasions, aims to publish research that informs understanding of the patterns and processes of invasions and discussion of relevant policy and conservation issues related to controlling invasions. Because the scope of the journal's interests is global, building an editorial board that represents the...
Article
Full-text available
Most biological invasion literature—including syntheses and meta-analyses and the resulting theory—is reported from temperate regions, drawing only minimally from the tropics except for some island systems. The lack of attention to invasions in the tropics results from and reinforces the assumption that tropical ecosystems, and especially the conti...
Article
Full-text available
1. Plant‐fungal associations strongly influence forest carbon and nitrogen cycling. The prevailing framework for understanding these relationships is through the relative abundance of arbuscular (AM) versus ectomycorrhizal (EcM) trees. Ericoid mycorrhizal (ErM) shrubs are also common in forests and interactions between co‐occurring ErM shrubs and A...
Article
Full-text available
The fields of ecology and conservation have evolved rapidly over the past century. Synthesizing larger trends in these disciplines remains a challenge yet is critical to bridging subdisciplines, guiding research, and informing educational frameworks. Here, we provide what we believe is the largest full‐text culturomic analysis of ecology and conser...
Article
As urbanization increases worldwide, so too are investments in nature‐based solutions that aim to mitigate urban stressors and counter the impacts of global climate change. Tree planting on degraded urban lands—or afforestation—is one form of nature‐based solution that has been increasingly implemented in cities around the world. The benefits of af...
Article
Full-text available
The coronavirus pandemic is more fully exposing ubiquitous economic and social inequities that pervade conservation science. In this time of prolonged stress on members of the research community, primary investigators or project leaders (PLs) have a unique opportunity to adapt their programs to jointly create more equitable and productive research...
Article
Full-text available
Lianas (woody vines) are a leading concern in urban forest management given their ability to reduce the growth rate and survival of trees. Efforts to control invasive lianas are widespread, yet forests are often reinvaded following management. Changes in soil nutrient availability could help explain why some forests are susceptible to reinvasion. S...
Article
1.Invasive plant effects on litter decomposition tend to be idiosyncratic among species and ecosystems, which may arise from variation in the invader's relative abundance (mass ratio effect), its relative functional difference to other species (trait divergence effect), and/or from species’ litter mixing that causes non‐additive decomposition rates...
Article
Soil organic carbon (SOC) is primarily formed from plant inputs, but the relative carbon (C) contributions from living root inputs (i.e. rhizodeposits) vs litter inputs (i.e. root + shoot litter) are poorly understood. Recent theory suggests that living root inputs exert a disproportionate influence on SOC formation, but few field studies have expl...
Article
Long-term research in ecology and evolution (LTREE) is considered fundamental for understanding complex ecological and evolutionary dynamics. However, others have argued for revision of LTREE efforts given perceived limitations in current research priorities and approaches. Yet most arguments about the benefits and failings of LTREE could be argued...
Article
Full-text available
Human activity is creating a global footprint by changing the climate, altering habitats and reshuffling the distribution of species. The movement of species around the globe has led to the naturalization and accumulation of multiple non-native species within ecosystems, which is frequently associated with habitat disturbance and changing environme...
Article
Full-text available
Although the co-occurrence of nonnative vertebrates is a ubiquitous global phenomenon, the study of interactions between invaders is poorly represented in the literature. Limited understanding of the interactions between co-occurring vertebrates can be problematic for predicting how the removal of only one invasive—a common management scenario—will...
Data
Literature Search Literature search: search terms use in a Web of Science® search for peer-reviewed studies on the impacts of removal a single invasive vertebrate species on native biodiversity. Details of the search conducted on the basis of genus of the terrestrial vertebrates invasive species reported among the 100 most damaging invasive species...
Data
List of species and reference used for the analysis
Data
Funnel plot analysis of sample size against the Hedges’ d value
Data
Results from the reduced dataset* to test for issues of pseudoreplication
Data
Extracted data used in meta-analysis
Article
To maximize limited conservation funds and prioritize management projects that are likely to succeed, accurate assessment of invasive nonnative species impacts is essential. A common challenge to prioritization is a limited knowledge of the difference between the impacts of a single nonnative species compared to the impacts of nonnative species whe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although the co-occurrence of nonnative vertebrates is a ubiquitous global phenomenon, the study of interactions between invaders is poorly represented in the literature. Limited understanding of the interactions between co-occurring vertebrates can be problematic for predicting how the removal of only one invasive—a common management scenario—will...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although the co-occurrence of nonnative vertebrates is a ubiquitous global phenomenon, the study of interactions between invaders is poorly represented in the literature. Limited understanding of the interactions between co-occurring vertebrates can be problematic for predicting how the removal of only one invasive—a common management scenario—will...
Article
Although many plant communities are invaded by multiple nonnative species, we have limited information on how a species' origin affects ecosystem function. We tested how differences in species richness and origin affect productivity and seedling establishment. We created phylogenetically paired native and nonnative plant communities in a glasshouse...
Article
Full-text available
Recent critics of invasion biology advocate reduced efforts against nonnative species, arguing that attempts to manage invasions are often costly and futile and that managers are indiscriminately managing species regardless of their impact. Whether this criticism has affected ground-level operations is unknown. A survey of land stewards of a major...
Article
Ecosystems containing multiple nonnative plant species are common, but mechanisms promoting their co-occurrence are understudied. Plant-soil interactions contribute to the dominance of singleton species in nonnative ranges because many nonnatives experience stronger positive feedbacks relative to co-occurring natives. Plant-soil interactions could...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods nteractions among organisms can shape biogeochemical cycling. In fact many of the talks in this session explore this topic. These interactions, especially when embedded in different climates, can shape plant traits. Differences among individuals in plant traits, via differences in genotypes and phenotypes, can alter th...
Article
The movement of species is one of the most pervasive forms of global change, and few ecosystems remain uninvaded by nonnative species. Studying species interactions is crucial for understanding their distribution and abundance, particularly for nonnative species because interactions may influence the probability of invasion and consequent ecologica...
Article
Though co‐occurrence of invasive plant species is common, few studies have compared the community and ecosystem impacts of invaders when they occur alone and when they co‐occur. Prioritization of invasive species management efforts requires sufficient knowledge of impacts – both among individual invasive species and among different sets of co‐occur...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Approximately one-third of forest invaders in the southeastern United States are woody shrub species. Many forests are invaded by multiple woody shrub species and little is known about the interactions of co-occurring invasive shrubs. Plant-soil feedbacks (PSF) are one mechanism explaining successful invasions. However...
Article
Full-text available
AimsIn this study, we examine two common invasion biology hypotheses - biotic resistance and fluctuating resource availability - to explain the patterns of invasion of an invasive grass, Microstegium vimineum.Methods We used 13-year-old deer exclosures in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA, to examine how chronic disturbance by deer browsing...
Data
a b s t r a c t Though biological invasion studies have proliferated in recent decades, a consistent emphasis remains on the study of single-species invasions. Here, we juxtapose the number of invasive plants reported as co-occurring within conservation habitats in one of the most comprehensive global conservation manage-ment databases (The Nature...
Article
Full-text available
Managing invasive species is a current challenge for biodiversity conservation. A recurring recent suggestion is that by harvesting nonnatives for human consumption, people can control invasive populations. Even though humans may be able to control or eradicate certain populations of nonnative species by harvesting them as food sources, several cav...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Co-occurring invasive plant species are increasingly common, and there is evidence that invader interactions affect future invasions. Plant-soil feedbacks (PSF) are one mechanism explaining successful plant invasions; non-native plants tend to create positive feedbacks when grown in soils cultivated by natives or consp...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Invasive plant species often enter communities as passengers, yet later become drivers of community dynamics, ultimately altering the functioning of ecosystems. Early successional old fields are ideal for addressing both the susceptibility of communities to plant invasions, but also the impact plant invasions may have...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods: It is well recognized that invasive plant species affect native communities and ecosystems. It is less understood how co-occurring invasive plants might interact with one another, and how these interactions might change their impacts. Invasion rates and the likelihood of encountering multiple invasive species within a...

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