Sandrine Morlot

Sandrine Morlot
Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire | IGBMC · Department of Biology and Stem Cell Development

About

19
Publications
1,514
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
654
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
October 2010 - December 2012
University of Geneva
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
The formation of protein aggregates is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases. Observations on patient samples and model systems demonstrated links between aggregate formation and declining mitochondrial functionality, but causalities remain unclear. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to analyze how mitochondrial processes regulate the behavior of...
Preprint
Full-text available
The formation of protein aggregates is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases. Observations on patient material and model systems demonstrated links between aggregate formation and declining mitochondrial functionality, but the causalities remained unclear. We used yeast as model system to analyze the relevance of mitochondrial processes for the...
Article
Full-text available
Loss of proteostasis and cellular senescence are key hallmarks of aging, but direct cause-effect relationships are not well understood. We show that most yeast cells arrest in G1 before death with low nuclear levels of Cln3, a key G1 cyclin extremely sensitive to chaperone status. Chaperone availability is seriously compromised in aged cells, and t...
Article
Full-text available
Budding yeast cells undergo a limited number of divisions before they enter senescence and die. Despite recent mechanistic advances, whether and how molecular events are temporally and causally linked during the transition to senescence remain elusive. Here, using real-time observation of the accumulation of extrachromosomal rDNA circles (ERCs) in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Loss of proteostasis and cellular senescence are key hallmarks of cell aging, but whether they are subject to direct cause-effect relationships is not known. We show that most yeast cells arrest in G1 before death with low nuclear levels of cyclin Cln3, a key activator of Start extremely sensitive to chaperone status. Chaperone availability is seri...
Preprint
The accumulation of E xtrachromosomal r DNA C ircles (ERCs) and their asymmetric segregation upon division have been hypothesized to be responsible for replicative senescence in mother yeasts and rejuvenation in daughter cells. However, it remains unclear by which molecular mechanisms ERCs would trigger the irreversible cell cycle slow-down leading...
Data
List of all strains used in this study. Table listing the strains used in this study as well as additional information about the genotypes and the origins of the strains. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23971.026
Article
Full-text available
Homeostatic systems that rely on genetic regulatory networks are intrinsically limited by the transcriptional response time, which may restrict a cell's ability to adapt to unanticipated environmental challenges. To bypass this limitation, cells have evolved mechanisms whereby exposure to mild stress increases their resistance to subsequent threats...
Article
Full-text available
In endocytosis, scaffolding is one of the mechanisms to create membrane curvature by moulding the membrane into the spherical shape of the clathrin cage. However, the impact of membrane elastic parameters on the assembly and shape of clathrin lattices has never been experimentally evaluated. Here, we show that membrane tension opposes clathrin poly...
Article
Cdc42 is a highly conserved master regulator of cell polarity. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which yeast cells never re-establish polarity at cortical sites (cytokinesis remnants [CRMs]) that have previously supported Cdc42-mediated growth as a paradigm to mechanistically understand how Cdc42-inhibitory polarity cues are established. We re...
Article
Full-text available
In eukaryotic cells, membrane compartments are split into two by membrane fission. This ensures discontinuity of membrane containers and thus proper compartmentalization. The first proteic machinery implicated in catalyzing membrane fission was dynamin. Dynamin forms helical collars at the neck of endocytic buds. This structural feature suggested t...
Article
The GTPase dynamin polymerizes into a helical coat that constricts membrane necks of endocytic pits to promote their fission. However, the dynamin mechanism is still debated because constriction is necessary but not sufficient for fission. Here, we show that fission occurs at the interface between the dyna-min coat and the uncoated membrane. At thi...
Article
The GTPase dynamin polymerizes into a helical coat that constricts membrane necks of endocytic pits to promote their fission. However, the dynamin mechanism is still debated because constriction is necessary but not sufficient for fission. Here, we show that fission occurs at the interface between the dynamin coat and the uncoated membrane. At this...
Article
Membrane fission is the final step enabling the release of vesicles during endocytosis. Dynamin is a protein required for this crucial process in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. It polymerizes into a helix at the neck between the plasma membrane and the endocytic bud. A constriction of the helix occurs upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis le...
Article
Dynamin is widely used by cells to sever lipid bilayers. During this process a short helical dynamin polymer (1 to 3 helical turns) assembles around a membrane tubule and reduces its radius and pitch upon GTP hydrolysis. This deformation is thought to be crucial for dynamin's severing action and results in an observable twisting of the helix [1]. H...
Article
Dynamin and other proteins of the dynamin superfamily are widely used by cells to sever lipid bilayers. During this process, a short helical dynamin polymer (one to three helical turns) assembles around a membrane tubule and reduces its radius and pitch upon guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis. This deformation is thought to be crucial for dynamin's...
Article
Membrane fission is the last step of membrane carrier formation. As fusion, it is a very common process in eukaryotic cells, and participates in the integrity and specificity of organelles. Although many proteins have been isolated to participate in the various membrane fission reactions, we are far from understanding how membrane fission is mechan...

Network

Cited By