Sandra A. Binning

Sandra A. Binning
Université de Neuchâtel | UniNE · Institut de biologie (IBIOL)

M.Sc.; PhD

About

61
Publications
15,263
Reads
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1,489
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in how fish (and other aquatic organisms) are affected by environmental stressors. These stressors include things like low oxygen, parasites, water flow, high salinity, etc. I try to figure out what effects these stressors have on populations of fishes focusing mainly on their swimming morphology and physiology (occasionally behaviour). I am especially interested in variation within species (intraspecific differences) along natural environmental gradients.
Additional affiliations
July 2014 - present
Université de Neuchâtel
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2010 - May 2014
Australian National University
Position
  • PhD Student
January 2009 - December 2010
McGill University
Education
March 2010 - May 2014
Australian National University
Field of study
  • Evolution and Ecology
September 2006 - February 2009
McGill University
Field of study
  • Ecology
September 2003 - May 2006
McGill University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (61)
Article
Full-text available
Our response to Munday et al.’s ‘Matters Arising’ letter, which addresses the key arguments they raised, is published alongside their letter (our response is referred to below as “our main document”). However, the word limit of our response set by Nature made it difficult to respond in sufficient detail, so we have copied each of the 16 points rais...
Article
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The continued citation of retracted papers — or ‘zombie’ publications — pollutes the scientific literature with fatally flawed studies. The problem is amplified by the common practice of accessing papers through third-party websites such as Google Scholar, ResearchGate and Sci-Hub, which generally do not link to retraction notices. We propose steps...
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Testing performance in controlled laboratory experiments is a powerful tool for understanding the extent and evolution of cognitive abilities in non-human animals. However, cognitive testing is prone to a number of potential biases, which, if unnoticed or unaccounted for, may affect the conclusions drawn. We examined whether slight modifications to...
Article
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Cleaning organisms play a fundamental ecological role by removing ectoparasites and infected tissue from client surfaces. We used the well-studied cleaning mutualisms involving the cleaner wrasse,Labroides dimidiatus,to test how client cognition is affected by ectoparasites and whether these effects are mitigated by cleaners. Ambon damselfish (Poma...
Article
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The Commentary by Pörtner, Bock and Mark (Pörtner et al., 2017) elaborates on the oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Biology Commentaries allow for personal and controversial views, yet the journal also mandates that ‘opinion and fact must be clearly distinguishable’ (http://jeb.biologists.org...
Article
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Adjusting one’s behaviour in response to eavesdropping bystanders is considered a sophisticated social strategy, yet the underlying mechanisms are not well studied. Cleaner wrasse, Labroides dimidiatus, cooperate by eating ectoparasites off “client” fishes, or cheat (i.e. bite) and eat client mucus. Image scoring by bystander clients generally caus...
Article
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During a parasitological survey of perciform fishes from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia, we found the following gill monogenoidean species (Platyhelminthes): Euryhaliotrema lizardi n. sp. on Caesio caerulaurea Lacepède, 1801 (Caesionidae) (type host) and Haliotrema weberii n. sp. on Chromis weberi Fowler and Bean, 1928 (Pomacentridae)...
Article
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Synopsis: Studies of animal locomotion and movement largely assume that individuals are healthy and performing to the best of their abilities in ways which are adapted to their survival. However, wild animals face numerous ecological challenges that can compromise their health, reduce their performance capacity, impair their movement abilities and...
Article
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Theoretical models predict that ocean acidification, caused by increased dissolved CO2, will reduce the maximum thermal limits of fishes, thereby increasing their vulnerability to rising ocean temperatures and transient heatwaves. Here, we test this prediction in three species of damselfishes on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Maximum thermal li...
Data
Electronic Supplementary Material for the paper: Maximum thermal limits of coral reef damselfishes are size dependent and resilient to near-future ocean acidification.
Article
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In a recent Opinion article, Parker et al. [1] highlight a range of important issues and provide tangible solutions to improve transparency in ecology and evolution (E&E). We agree wholeheartedly with their points and encourage the E&E community to heed their advice. However, a key issue remains conspicuously unaddressed: Parker et al. assume that...
Article
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![Graphic][1] Breaststroke, butterfly, front crawl and back crawl: many of us learnt these swimming styles as kids while splashing around in our local pool. These strokes all involve the swimmer lying on their back or front, much like the way most fish swim. Of course, some people prefer to
Article
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Animal 'personality', defined as repeatable inter-individual differences in behaviour, is a concept in biology that faces intense controversy. Critics argue that the field is riddled with terminological and methodological inconsistencies and lacks a sound theoretical framework. Nevertheless, experimental biologists are increasingly studying individ...
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![Graphic][1] We've all heard the boiling frog cautionary tale: place a frog in hot water and it will immediately jump out. Gradually heat the water and the frog will bask in the warmth until it's too late. This story is used to advise people against the dangers of ignoring small, but
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1.Survival depends on appropriate behavioural and physiological responses to danger. In addition to active "fight-flight" defence responses, a passive "freeze-hide" response is adaptive in some contexts. However, the physiological mechanisms determining which individuals choose a given defence response remain poorly understood. 2.We examined the re...
Article
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Respirometry is frequently used to estimate metabolic rates and examine organismal responses to environmental change. Although a range of methodologies exists, it remains unclear whether differences in chamber design and exercise (type and duration) produce comparable results within individuals and whether the most appropriate method differs across...
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![Graphic][1] Any farmer will tell you that to get the strength of a donkey with the temperament of a horse, mate them to get a mule. This genetic swapping between species has been orchestrated by humans for centuries to create hybrids with desirable traits. Nature also sometimes confuses the
Article
Migration, a widespread animal behavior, can influence how individuals acquire and transmit pathogens. Past work has demonstrated that migration can reduce the costs of pathogen or parasite infection through two processes: migratory escape from infected areas or individuals and migratory culling of infected individuals. Here, we propose a third pro...
Article
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Large disturbances can cause rapid degradation of coral reef communities, but what baseline changes in species assemblages occur on undisturbed reefs through time? We surveyed live coral cover, reef fish abundance and fish species richness in 1997 and again in 2007 on 47 fringing patch reefs of varying size and depth at Mersa Bareika, Ras Mohammed...
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![Graphic][1] When face to face with a predator, would you rather have blistering speed to out-run or fancy footwork to out-manoeuvre your foe? If you opted for speed, you're not alone. We intuitively think quicker means better when it comes to eluding capture. Our fascination with fast is so
Data
Supplemental Tables and Figures Tables S1, S2, S3, S4 Figures S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6.
Article
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Policies that mandate public data archiving (PDA) successfully increase accessibility to data underlying scientific publications. However, is the data quality sufficient to allow reuse and reanalysis? We surveyed 100 datasets associated with nonmolecular studies in journals that commonly publish ecological and evolutionary research and have a stron...
Article
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![Figure][1] Swimming is hard work: ask anyone donning a bathing cap and goggles during morning laps in their local pool. Yet, life underwater is a reality for millions of organisms on our blue planet. To overcome the physical challenges imposed by life in the depths, sea creatures have
Article
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![Figure][1] It's an all too familiar scene: you're driving along a smooth stretch of road, not an obstacle in sight, when, suddenly, a group of birds/frogs/lizards/furry animals materializes in your path. You try honking, flashing your lights, but to no avail. Finally, just when it seems
Article
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The relationships among animal form, function and performance are complex, and vary across environments. Therefore, it can be difficult to identify morphological and/or physiological traits responsible for enhancing performance in a given habitat. In fishes, differences in swimming performance across water flow gradients are related to morphologica...
Article
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http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/14-0426.1 Water flow gradients have been linked to phenotypic differences and swimming performance across a variety of fish assemblages. However, the extent to which water motion shapes patterns of phenotypic divergence within species remains unknown. We tested the generality of the functional relationship...
Article
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![Figure][1] We may not think of childhood as a particularly stressful time in our lives, but growing up is scary. There are rules, actions and consequences that all young things must learn fast in order to survive. These early experiences can play a huge role in shaping individual
Article
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Survival depends on escape responses and when to flee a predator. As a result, factors affecting the escape performance of prey species, including parasite infection, may profoundly influence the outcome of predator–prey encounters. Several hypotheses predict the responses of prey to simulated predator attacks based on intrinsic characteristics suc...
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Predators use a variety of strategies for capturing prey. Trap-building predators can save on searching and encountering costs by investing in the construction and maintenance of traps such as webs and pits. However, what to do with partially consumed prey poses a potential problem. Antlion larvae (Myrmeleon acer) catch ants in conical pits, and di...
Article
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Unsteady water flows are common in nature, yet the swimming performance of fishes is typically evaluated at constant, steady speeds in the laboratory. We examined how cyclic changes in water flow velocity affect the swimming performance and energetics of a labriform swimmer, the shiner surfperch, Cymatogaster aggregata. Using intermittent-flow resp...
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An increasing number of publishers and funding agencies require public data archiving (PDA) in open-access databases. PDA has obvious group benefits for the scientific community, but many researchers are reluctant to share their data publicly because of real or perceived individual costs. Improving participation in PDA will require lowering costs a...
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Wave-driven water flow is a major force structuring marine communities. Species distributions are partly determined by the ability to cope with variation in water flow, such as differences in the assemblage of fish species found in a given water flow environment being linked to swimming ability (based on fin shape and mode of locomotion). It remain...
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http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v502/n7470/full/502171a.html
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It is important to understand the patterns of succession and competition in seagrass beds as a way of explaining recovery processes after disturbances. This project studies macroalgae-seagrass succession dynamics in the Caribbean, and tests the importance of interspecific density- dependence (competition) in predicting the successional sequence of...
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http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00265-013-1562-1 Preferential use of one side of the body for cognitive or behavioural tasks (lateralization) is common in many animals, including humans. However, few studies have demonstrated whether lateralization is phenotypically plastic, and varies depending on the ecological context. We studied later...
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While morphological variation across geographical clines has been well documented, it is often unclear whether such changes enhance individual performance to local environments. We examined whether the damselfish Acanthochromis polyacanthus display functional changes in swimming phenotype across a 40-km cline in wave-driven water motion on the Grea...
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Full text available at http://jeb.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jeb.082925 Metabolic rates of aquatic organisms are estimated from measurements of oxygen consumption rates (MO2) through swimming and resting respirometry. These distinct approaches are increasingly used in eco- and conservation physiology studies; however, few studies have teste...
Article
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Ectoparasites can reduce individual fitness by negatively affecting behavioural, morphological and physiological traits. In fishes, there are potential costs if ectoparasites decrease streamlining, thereby directly compromising swimming performance. Few studies have examined the effects of ectoparasites on fish swimming performance and none disting...
Article
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Published paper available at http://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/ZO12130.htm Citation: Roche, Dominique G., Strong, Laura E., and Binning, Sandra A. (2013). Prevalence of the parasitic cymothoid isopod Anilocra nemipteri on its fish host at Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef. Australian Journal of Zoology 60, 330–333. Parasites are ubiquitous in nat...
Article
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Coral reef fish density and species richness are often higher at sites with more structural complexity. This association may be due to greater availability of shelters, but surprisingly little is known about the size and density of shelters and their use by coral reef fishes. We quantified shelter availability and use by fishes for the first time o...
Data
Shelter occupancy and fish density in relation to shelter density and median shelter volume. Three-dimensional plots showing A) the proportion of shelters occupied and B) fish density as a function of shelter density (y-axis) and median shelter volume (x-axis) for the 30 quadrats sampled. Black dots represent individual quadrats and the relationshi...
Data
The Information Theoretical approach: procedures for model selection with AICc and model averaging. (DOCX)
Data
Median shelter volume per quadrat: A) Predictors and interaction terms included in the four best models explaining variation in median shelter volume in 30 25-m2 quadrats located in three zones (RC = reef crest, SG = spur and groove, FS = fragmented spurs) on two reefs (NB = North Bellairs reef, CH = Chefette reef). B) Predictors and interaction te...
Data
Fish abundance and diversity in holes and overhangs. Abundance of fishes found in shelters (holes and overhangs) in 30 quadrats sampled on two fringing reefs in Barbados. (DOCX)
Data
Rarefaction curve in shelter-using fish. Shelter-based rarefaction curve (solid line) ± standard deviation (shaded area) relating the expected number of species observed to the number of occupied shelters sampled across all 30 quadrats. (TIF)
Data
Shelter occupancy: A) Predictors included in the four best models explaining variation in shelter occupancy in 30 25-m2 quadrats located in three reef zones (RC = reef crest, SG = spur and groove, FS = fragmented spurs) on two reefs (NB = North Bellairs reef, CH = Chefette reef), B) Predictors and interaction terms included in the best two models e...
Article
This study describes a novel method for measuring pectoral fin aspect ratio (AR) on live coral-reef fishes and tests the method against traditional measurements taken from a dissected fin. No significant differences were detected among repeated fin measurements, which validates the accuracy (intact v. dissected) and precision (repeatability over se...
Article
Interspecific studies have demonstrated that trophic morphology and ecology are not always tightly matched: a phenomenon rarely reported at the intraspecific level. In the present study, we explored relationships among diet, morphology and the environment in a widespread cichlid fish, Astatoreochromis alluaudi (Pellegrin 1904), from 6 sites in sout...
Article
Environmental factors can directly influence phenotype such that a tight correlation between morphological and environmental variation is expected. However, morphological response to environmental variation may also reflect constraints imposed by interactions between adjacent structures such as the gills and the trophic apparatus in fishes. Such co...
Article
The stable isotope ratio and seasonal changes in diet of Alluaud's haplo Astatoreochromis alluaudi, a cichlid fish with massive pharyngeal jaws well known for its ability to process hard-bodied prey, are described. The diet of A. alluaudi was quantified in Lake Saka, Uganda, over a period of 30 months. Variation in physico-chemical variables (mean...
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As the rate of biological invasions continues to increase, a growing number of aquatic introduced species are becoming globally widespread. Despite this ubiquitous phenomenon, rarely do we discover aquatic invaders early enough to allow the possibility of eradication. Recently, the North American Harris mud crab (Rhithropanopeus harrisii) was found...
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Cichlid fishes of the East African Great Lakes represent some of the most diverse vertebrate faunas in the world, and trophic specialization, the specific adaptation of feeding structures to one type of prey, is often used to explain the coexistence of these closely related species. However, Liem's Paradox suggests that organisms with specialized p...
Article
Cichlid fishes of the East African Great Lakes represent some of the most diverse vertebrate faunas in the world, and trophic specialization, the specific adaptation of feeding structures to one type of prey, is often used to explain the coexistence of these closely related species. However, Liem’s Paradox suggests that organisms with specialized p...
Article
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Ecomorphology is founded on the premise that ecological interactions are reflected in adaptive morphological change across individuals, populations, and communities. Specialization in feeding structures is often used to describe and classify species and is believed to be an important mechanism driving speciation in a number of taxa including Darwin...
Article
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The sequence of ecological changes in which one species is replaced by another is known as succession. Den Hartog (1971) was the first to propose successional schemes for seagrass communities based on competition-colonization hierarchies, which have rarely been challenged. Wave-disturbed subtidal systems are characterized by the presence of gaps, t...

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