Sandeep Savitaprakash Sharma

Sandeep Savitaprakash Sharma
Magnum Opus International, Ahmedabad, India · Research and Management

6.03
 · 
M.Sc ; MBA; PGDCA ; Creativity & Innovation
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Introduction
1) FOUNDER AND PRESIDENT (iscpf ) INTERNATIONAL SHEKHAWATI CULTURAL PRESERVATION FOUNDATION. 2)AUTHOR, RESEARCHER 3)SOCIAL WORKER 4)AN ENTREPRENEUR 5)Director-MAGNUM OPUS INTERNATIONAL BASICALLY 23 YRS EXPERIENCE WITH INDUSTRY AND 15 YRS AS DIRECTOR -MAGNUM OPUS INTERNATIONAL HAS ENCOURAGED ME TO TRY NEW IDEAS AND THINGS . CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION AT WORK HAS BEEN MY FIRST LOVE. MY KEY INTEREST AREAS- CREATIVITY/INNOVATION, SUSTAINABILITY, CULTURE, RESEARCH ON THE LITERACY, CULTURE , HERITAGE, FORTS OF SHEKHAWATI PRESENTLY WORKING ON HERITAGE-CULTURE OF SHEKHAWATI .STUDYING THE FORT SURAJGARH WITH PURPOSE OF CONTRIBUTING IN PRESERVING THE CULTURE OF SHEKHAVATI AND LETTING THE WORK SHARE WITH THE WORLD. Researcher ID:B-7778-2019 Orcid ID: 0000-0001-5737-5610
Research Experience
Dec 2012
Magnum Opus International, Ahmedabad, India
Position
  • Research Director
Education
Apr 1997 - Apr 2000
Gujarat University
Field of study
  • Management-Creativity
Apr 1996 - Apr 1997
St.Xaviers college
Field of study
  • Computer application
Apr 1994 - Apr 1996
Gujarat University
Field of study
  • M.Sc.-Electronics and space science
Network
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Following
Projects
Projects (12)
Project
To analyse the effect of laughter as a practice , and its effect on creativity output by experimental method.
Project
Unconventional Tools, techniques and practices for -Creativity and innovation Lab. - Unconventional Effective Techniques to enhance creativity in kids. -Unconventional Effective practices for creativity and innovation lab . -unconventional effective tools for creativity and innovation lab.
Project
CREATIVITY IDEAS BANK (CIB) . Creative Idea Approval(CIA) then, To develop A new system concept formulation whereby voluntarily the creative ideas are stored with your name and with concent are available for the use to others. The governemnt agencies can start up with Creative ideation clusters(CIC). the people public partnemship can further work on development of such ideas , i.e. Creative Ideation Development (CID) . Furthering the Creative IDeation Enterpreneurship (CIE). Further more the Creative Ideation Factories (CIF) then Creative IDEATION Group formation(CIG) Then Creative Ideation Hiring (CIH) and on and on till we achieve the CIZ(Creative ideation Zooming).
Research
Research items (1,005)
Article
Full-text available
Creativity nurturing behaviour scale for teachers Author(s): Ekta Sharma ( AU Ahmedabad India ) ...Show all authors Abstract: Purpose Today, Innovation and creativity are the buzz words in the galore of not only business but also of Education. The need to foster creativity and innovation has long been a priority in the educational and corporate s...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Psychometric properties of the Russian version of Creativity Nurturing Behavior Scale for Teachers (CNBST) Miroshnik K. G., Sharma Sandeep Savitaprakash., & Sharma Ekta. Keywords: creativity, education, teacher, creativity nurturing behavior, cross-cultural validation Fostering and enhancing creative potential is perceived as one of the important...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
How do we nurture creativity in students in preparing them for life and work in the 21st Century? The answer to this question is gaining much attention by educational practitioners and researchers as “creativity” as a skill is essential to securing and succeeding at jobs in the 21st Century workplace. Building on existing research in the literature...
Preprint
Full-text available
The current study intends to understand the creativity levels at different units of analysis i.e. individual and group. We further focus our study on the significance of different processes i.e. individual, collaboration and guidance at different stages of innovation or creativity. The study is based on the Wallach Hogan test of creativity which an...
Question
Desire to explore the unknown -biggest cause of motivation ?
or
desire to attain - is greater source of motivation :
one is theory of need and other is creativity.
both requires risk.
wht are your views on the subject.
please do provide your expertise comments.
creative destruction as the engine of capitalist development is well-known. However, that the destructive part of creative destruction is a social and economic cost and therefore biases our estimate of the impact of the innovation on GDP is hardly acknowledged, with the notable exception of Witt (1996. “Innovations, Externalities and the Problem of Economic Progress.” Public Choice 89:113–30). Admittedly, during the First and Second Industrial Revolutions the magnitude of the destructive component of innovation was no doubt small compared to the net value added to GDP. However, we conjecture that recently the destructive component of innovations has increased relative to the size of the creative component as the new technologies are often creating products which are close substitutes for the ones they replace whose value depreciates substantially in the process of destruction. Consequently, the contribution of recent innovations to GDP is likely upwardly biased. This note calls for further research in innovation economics in order to measure and decompose the effects of innovations into their creative and destructive components in order to provide improved estimates of their contribution to GDP and to employment.
Schrumpeter saw “creative destruction” as the renewing, through new innovation, society’s dynamics that would lead into higher levels of economic development and welfare. At the same time recognizing that this destroyed a few of the incumbents to the benefits of many more newcomers and increasing value creation for broader society.
Today it seems we are caught in the reverse of this- the process of “destructive creation”- where it benefits a few rather than the many. This sets out often to destroy or greatly diminish the usage value of existing products and services before it is optimal to actually do so, and in the process incurring often significant costs not taken into account at the time. These unforeseen issues have consequences that negatively affect parts of society not foreseen or contemplated at the time.
The shift has placed the emphasis on the role of destruction rather than creation in driving innovation activity. This is getting uncomfortable, innovation then becomes not so good for you perhaps? This is becoming the game for a few to make money, to corner markets, to dominate and wanting to achieve monopolistic positions and not so worried over the wealth creation aspects of creating jobs, building communities, cherishing certain values. We need to be on guard in understanding the fundamentals within innovation as it should advance for the good of society, not be actually working to its detriment. Actually who is benefiting from the distribution of new wealth? The developed world is seeking desperately ways to regain growth but it needs to be more equitable, not in the hands of a few that determine our choices but increasingly seem unaccountable for their actions.
Firstly a couple of examples of “creative destruction”
A really good one was the arrival of the personal computer, the economy significantly profited without significant economic upheaval. It raised productivity and ushered in significant value for many.  The typewriter of course quickly became obsolete for this “creative destruction” and certainly the organizations investing in this lost out.
Another one has been the general advancement of technology. For example within the telecom sector where we were able to benefit from massive increases in managing data, calls and volumes around the world to connect us all up into a global economy. Old switch boards, chunky mainframes and old communicating technology were thrown out and this advancement in technology allowed the scarce resource of people to be employed differently and more productively. Technology has provided huge advancements but it also has its downsides.
The problem both of these examples have though is they are technology lead. Technology has been racing ahead. With the active encouragement of “policy innovation” and its stimulus we have been building more complexity as technology became more powerful. Complexity is everywhere. You add in scientific advances it has been a powerful combination effect of promoting social change- often radical social change. All positive, or has it been?
Today, we are dependent on complex technological systems to manage much, often incomprehensible to most if not all of us. Let me give you a couple of examples of the growing downsides we are seeing.
Let me provide some examples of “destructive creation”
Derivatives- that dirty word that we have been struggling with over the past few years, that has been causing much within our current global downturn. At its heart was a system no one quite understood that created mortgage leverages, financial convertibles and it was in this proliferation of complexity and uncertainly these highly leveraged investments had become totally incoherent to us. The “destructive creation” part then kicks in often in unexpected ways with tragic consequences for many in lost jobs, lost homes, lost lives and lost investment money for  many, while a few made massive gains.
Asia was another example; its lightening speed in its growth had lead to a recent financial crisis simply triggered by capital account converting that shifting into a myriad of different financial instruments. The downside of that had not been anticipated in policy intervention and we had a significant scale of financial destruction that was not creative but destructive in its effect to the economies for some time. Again many people lost out, for some, recovery from this effect never occured -it changed their lives, often to start again.
Although we are told there are sound risk models in place to assess and antiscipate, we certainly can’t look upon the promise from these with the same naivety in the future after a number of recent events. Much seems unpredictable in hidden consequences. But I would ask “have we lost the plot a little here”, perhaps we can’t really predict and control anymore, when the complexities we have built still continue and add even more layers. We need to accept more ‘destructive creation’ will occur.
The destructive effects presently going on in Europe
Let’s take Greece and its ‘melt down’ of the past twelve months. Could we have predicted the massive social unrest and serious economic decline in the approaches taken by the parties responsible for managing an orderly recovery?  How many times are we hearing “structural adjustment” to cover massive upheaval and watching a civil collapse happening on front of our eyes. Thousands of previously healthy businesses in Greece are being starved of finances, of demand and caught up in such social upheaval. This is ‘destructive creation’ for the many who have got caught up in the ‘collective adjustment’ applied.
How will the Euro shake out in the coming months when our leaders just seem unable to get their heads around its complexity? This is a proliferation of complexity fuelling uncertainty. Is this because we have been great inventors and innovators or poor at working through all the consequences as analytics alone can’t explain these things in coherent ways, we just watch “destructive forces” being applied in the name of social and structural adjustment sweep away whole swaths of creative good as well. The pursuit of growth and wealth is fine but are we balancing the conflicting values, consequences and upheavals well enough in the equation, otherwise it tips from this “creative destruction” over into “destructive creation” and that is not a healthy place for innovation to be.
The obsession with innovation- myself included!
Presently our Governments are obsessed with innovation- it sometimes feels it is the only game in town for future growth. Let’s just keep adding novelty and ever increasing value to get our economies going seems to be the mantra.  The problem is we seem to be destroying more than we can build at present, yet a ‘few’ gain from these seeds of “destructive creation” while a majority don’t. We need to flip this back to “creative destruction”.
How much of a society cost are we prepared to pay? Should all this be laid at the door of innovation? We need to inquire about, to explain and understand these forces, both the positive and negative far more. You can get to a certain point where you hit innovation saturation and we will begin to reject it unless we see its value invested within our community, not in others far away.
The replacement rate is speeding up
The other part of “destructive creation” is the attention we are all paying to the replacement rate. The way we discard our mobile phones, cars, household goods and creative increasing ‘toxic’ waste has its destructive creation part. These were foreseen, even have been actively encouraged to promote our economic well being but are they?
I know Steve jobs and Apple is a beacon of success but there is a darker side to this. High rates of innovation, often not truly needed, can be disruptive to the larger society as a whole. A few jobs, many outsourced into low cost environments is leading to a jobless growth in the rest of the industry, it is destroying the usage value (useful life left) of existing products to the benefit of the few, rather than the many.  Some might call this a “shutdown game” establishing conditions that negatively affect values of other products, or is that still called offensive marketing, knowing exactly what the customer needs? I’m not 100% convinced.
Shareholder value is our focus point but what about the shut downs, those old, empty, rusty building that seem to be increasing not decreasing. We are faced more with deindustrialization issues than seeing re-industrialization coming from the present ‘destruction’ forces unleashed upon us all today. What is the cost of disruption and destruction of whole communities in social costs, in our investments for the future when we can’t ‘feel’ or see the benefits of “creative destruction” emerging?
There are many industries that start out thinking they are on the path to “creative destruction” but somewhere along the road got flipped into “destructive creation”. Often this was not the intended path but it became the consequence. Adding more just reinforced the greater destruction leaving it less creative, except in pockets of expertise. Competition fell away; we went into troughs of uninspiring innovation for some time. Consumer software upgrades come to mind here, killing off perfectly good software to force us into upgrading but actually pushing us to search for alternatives, killing off useful gained knowledge and continued utility. Where is the cross over point in “creative” and “destruction”?
The quicker we adapt, the sharper we suffer declines somewhere else- technological choices and social consequences- new gadgets vs. decline in privacy for example. Yet the total industry consequence of one party dominating in “destructive creation” is only seen that much later on when the total decline cannot be stopped. It is often not one parties fault unless they are deliberate in their design but we are losing the ability to understand all the consequences of decisions, with unforeseen knock-on consequences .
For instance, if our banks don’t change as society is perceiving they should, and the policy makers seem unable to work through the complexity of this level of change, then society has two choices: remain with the present system where a few seem to gain over the majority, or seek out a change in the financial lending system so society again puts back “creative” at the front of “destruction” to benefit the broader community. Let’s be honest, the banking industry has not been so innovative in many ways, besides enhancing wealth creation by the use of financial instruments or just to constantly sustain the existing ‘world order’. Will an alternative to our existing financial system evolve and or disrupt, but at what destructive cost?
Disconnects are all around.
There is, when you look around, a lot of seemingly partial and disconnected aspects to our advancement. Where are we in our debates on climate change, stem cell research, toxic chemicals, landfills and plenty more.  How will we manage the feeding of the world in years to come? How will we manage the old and sick. How will society re-integrate growing groups who are getting disenfranchised? All of these can be destructive or built on constructive ways that ‘create’ orderly change. Yet, they seem bogged down in complexity, opposing forces and we are not breaking through these in new order ways. We somehow must.
There are always it seems contesting sides and consistent daily arguments from all sides in complex arguments about how the world would work and why their solution provides the answer. The problem is we simply don’t know. We seem to be losing comprehension of the bigger picture. I’m not sure when you try to describe the big picture it really is so coherent and that is one of our big problems.
Issues are just far too complex.
We are facing more uncertainly and incoherence than ever. Should we call a moratorium on innovation or is it just invention? Can we afford too?
It is interesting observation, we do seem to have moved back to enjoy narratives, myths and cult stories more than in the past, is that a yearning for something from the past in our  lives where one person tells a story that just made sense as it seemed full of wisdom and real good for many?  I think us, as humans, have been reduced down and until we can regain mastery over the complex, needing a structural and societal adjustment or we otherwise will continue to suffer the consequences of “destructive creation.” I think we might start yearning for the good old days of just “creative destruction.” Is technology leading and we are lagging? Can we regain control?
So some commentators have suggested that we have to reawaken our imaginations and really think deeply about our values. Then innovation can perhaps return to being context-specific working in positive enhancing ways to improve society as a whole and not be used for a selected few. All I hope is it will let us ensure we put the emphais back far more on the “creative” innovation part and not the ‘destructive’ nature we have been moving towards recently.
Certainly inspired and some points drawn from a paper “Destructive Creation and the New World Order” by Paul Harris & Daniel Sarewitz
Question
IS CREATIVITY ALWAYS CREATIVE , OR IT CAN BE DESTRUCTIVE ALSO ? UNDER WHAT CONDITIONS ?
Question
Is Creativity and Innovation Sustainable, Why we need to rethink and recreate over a period of time.?
Do Sustainability relates to creativity ?
try to critically swap both terms -Creativity , Sustainabality?
please give your perspective on the statements.
best regards
Preprint
Full-text available
Creative Teachers workforce is the key to sustainable nation as it facilitates creativity-innovation and helps the future citizens , present kids in nation development and better prospects for job and business.. The TCNB scale has been used is found good in sights for teachers development in Ghana.
Question
dear Researcher friends,
The research should have a pupose. Which is not the scientific aim of research. It may me
-Learning
-Maintaining my position in institute
-Society welfare at large
-Fun
-Serious scienctic commitments
-as a part of job.
-personal achievement motive
-or other
you are free to add more purpose. let us have a good discussion.
best regards
A teaching comprises the principles and methods used by teachers to enable student learning. These strategies are determined partly on subject matter to be taught and partly by the nature of the learner. For a particular teaching method to be appropriate and efficient it has to be in relation with the characteristic of the learner and the type of learning it is supposed to bring about. Suggestions are there to design and selection of teaching methods must take into account not only the nature of the subject matter but also how students learn. In today's school the trend is that it encourages a lot of creativity. It is a known fact that human advancement comes through reasoning. This reasoning and original thought enhances creativity.
The approaches for teaching can be broadly classified into teacher centered and student centered. In Teacher-Centered Approach to Learning, Teachers are the main authority figure in this model. Students are viewed as "empty vessels" whose primary role is to passively receive information (via lectures and direct instruction) with an end goal of testing and assessment. It is the primary role of teachers to pass knowledge and information onto their students. In this model, teaching and assessment are viewed as two separate entities. Student learning is measured through objectively scored tests and assessments.[2] In Student-Centered Approach to Learning, while teachers are the authority figure in this model, teachers and students play an equally active role in the learning process. The teacher's primary role is to coach and facilitate student learning and overall comprehension of material. Student learning is measured through both formal and informal forms of assessment, including group projects, student portfolios, and class participation. Teaching and assessments are connected; student learning is continuously measured during teacher instruction.[2] Commonly used teaching methods may include class participation, demonstration, recitation, memorization, or combinations of these.
A teaching comprises the principles and methods used by teachers to enable student learning. These strategies are determined partly on subject matter to be taught and partly by the nature of the learner. For a particular teaching method to be appropriate and efficient it has to be in relation with the characteristic of the learner and the type of learning it is supposed to bring about. Suggestions are there to design and selection of teaching methods must take into account not only the nature of the subject matter but also how students learn. In today's school the trend is that it encourages a lot of creativity. It is a known fact that human advancement comes through reasoning. This reasoning and original thought enhances creativity.
The approaches for teaching can be broadly classified into teacher centered and student centered. In Teacher-Centered Approach to Learning, Teachers are the main authority figure in this model. Students are viewed as "empty vessels" whose primary role is to passively receive information (via lectures and direct instruction) with an end goal of testing and assessment. It is the primary role of teachers to pass knowledge and information onto their students. In this model, teaching and assessment are viewed as two separate entities. Student learning is measured through objectively scored tests and assessments.[2] In Student-Centered Approach to Learning, while teachers are the authority figure in this model, teachers and students play an equally active role in the learning process. The teacher's primary role is to coach and facilitate student learning and overall comprehension of material. Student learning is measured through both formal and informal forms of assessment, including group projects, student portfolios, and class participation. Teaching and assessments are connected; student learning is continuously measured during teacher instruction.[2] Commonly used teaching methods may include class participation, demonstration, recitation, memorization, or combinations of these.
Question
Does motivation changes at different stages of creativity and innovation Process in a project? Also does motivation rise with rise in age ?
Question
Rise and fall in Demand and supply of Creativity and innovation.
-which areas have seen rise in Demand and whether there is adequate supply of creativity and innovation?
-Which area have seen fall in Demand and supply of creativity and innovation ? why
-What are the your views on it ?
Question
Creativity and celebration
Millions of young people around the world are increasingly engaging on digital platforms in learning computer programming to create and share interactive projects, and connect with others online. Not surprisingly, this has also led to a growing interest in designing tools and methods that can automatically assess children's progress in computational learning by analyzing the data being generated by their participation. Many of these approaches are looking at children's data with a narrow lens, often using it to generate dashboards that are primarily designed for educators, and focus exclusively on evaluating specific computational concepts in children's projects. In this thesis, I design and offer an alternative approach - one that utilizes children's data for empowering children themselves to celebrate, discover, and reflect on the full range of their contributions as members of a creative community. I introduce Scratch Memories, a new web-based visualization system I developed to enable children to reflect on their creative journey with Scratch, the world's largest online programming community for children. The system dynamically generates personalized visualizations highlighting a child's key moments, diverse creations, and collaborative experiences with others since the time they first joined the community. I share my own creative journey and the iterative development process behind this work. Based on observations and semi-structured interviews, I describe how the system not only sparked children to reflect on their personal trajectories, but also to feel inspired to make new memories. I conclude by describing future work through what I call my explorable explorations - a set of new in-progress tools and ideas that I hope can inspire others to create positive reflective experiences with data that celebrate, rather than evaluate, children's creative selves
Thank you all of you for your discussion and guiding perspective in the answers.
best
Sandy
Improving creativity performance by short-term meditation
Xiaoqian Ding,1 Yi-Yuan Tang,📷2,3 Rongxiang Tang,4 and Michael I Posner3Author information Article notes Copyright and License information DisclaimerThis article has been cited by other articles in PMC.Go to:
Abstract
Background
One form of meditation intervention, the integrative body-mind training (IBMT) has been shown to improve attention, reduce stress and change self-reports of mood. In this paper we examine whether short-term IBMT can improve performance related to creativity and determine the role that mood may play in such improvement.
Methods
Forty Chinese undergraduates were randomly assigned to short-term IBMT group or a relaxation training (RT) control group. Mood and creativity performance were assessed by the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) and Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) questionnaire respectively.
Results
As predicted, the results indicated that short-term (30 min per day for 7 days) IBMT improved creativity performance on the divergent thinking task, and yielded better emotional regulation than RT. In addition, cross-lagged analysis indicated that both positive and negative affect may influence creativity in IBMT group (not RT group).
Conclusions
Our results suggested that emotion-related creativity-promoting mechanism may be attributed to short-term meditation.
Keywords: Creativity, Emotion, Positive affect, Negative affect, Short-term meditation, Integrative body-mind training, Cross-lagged analysisGo to:
Background
Creativity is a phenomenon whereby something novel (i.e., original and unexpected) and appropriate (i.e., valuable and adaptive concerning task constraints) is created [1], such as an idea, an artistic or literary work, a painting or musical composition, a solution, and an invention. Creativity is essential to the development and advancement of human civilization and plays a crucial role in our cultural life [2]. Hence, researchers among various disciplines have burgeoning interest in the potential for fostering creativity through education and training.
Traditionally, creativity is viewed as a relatively stable individual difference, with some people being regarded as consistently more creative than others [3]. More recently, creativity has been studied as a less stable phenomenon that varies as a function of brief states of the person and situation [2,4]. It is possible to measure creativity in a fast way that allows assessment of states induced by training. As one of the most widely used test of creativity, Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) is easy to administrate in short time [5,6]. It has fewer limitations and cautions to apply, and is more researched and analyzed than any other creativity instrument [6,7]. Many studies examined the predictive validity of the TTCT including elementary education majors, seventh-grade students, and economically disadvantaged elementary school Black children, which increased the TTCT’s credibility as a predictor of creative productivity [8]. A series of follow-up studies at the range from 7- to 22-year interval found that three of the TTCT subscales (fluency, flexibility and originality) correlated significantly (at the .01 level) with creative achievements [9-11]. Moreover, many reanalysis studies of Torrance’s data concluded that the Creative Indexes (fluency, flexibility, and originality) are the best predictors for adult creative achievement [12,13].
The popularity of meditation in the West has led research into its influence on creativity [14]. Previous studies showed that long-term (over years) meditation training enhances creativity as assessed by TTCT [15,16]. For example, open-monitoring meditation, in which an individual is open to perceive and observe any sensation, promotes divergent thinking, a style of thinking that allows many new ideas to be generated [16]. Some recent research showed that short-term meditation has fostering effects on creative thinking. For example, maintaining a mindful and alert state during meditation results in more insight [17]. In addition, Zen practitioners who meditated in the laboratory performed better on the creative test than Zen practitioners who did not meditate [18]. Our pilot work also suggested that around 3 hours IBMT (30 min/session for 7 sessions) can enhance the creative ability as assessed by TTCT [19]. Although studies have shown the positive effect of meditation on creativity, the cognitive mechanisms are largely unknown [20].
Mood represents a transient state that has attracted a great deal of attention as a potential facilitator of creativity [21-23]. Positive affect (PA) produces more fluent and original responses [21,22,24], while negative affect (NA) has the opposite effect [25,26]. For example, PA leads to greater cognitive flexibility and facilitates creative problem solving across a broad range of settings [27]. PA increases creative performance and implementation efficiency, while NA has no effect [28]. In addition, a study with 256 undergraduates shows that PA tends to be induced to create and use categories more inclusively than NA [26]. Results are interpreted in terms of an influence of affect on cognitive organization. PA biases cognitive control mechanisms in ways that facilitate creativity [29] and borderline effects of NA on categorization might result from normal people’s attempts to cope with NA [26]. Hence, previous studies lead some researchers to conclude that PA promotes fluent and original thinking [21,22,24,30], while NA has the opposite effect [25,26].
Meditation is associated with greater emotion regulation [31-33]. For example, 5 days of IBMT has been shown to improve mood and cognitive processes [34]. Four days of mindfulness meditation is effective at reducing anxiety scores and other cognitive manipulations [35]. A similar training regimen improves mood when compared to a sham meditation and control group [28]. Further, four meditation sessions resulted in greater improvements in mood than participants in a sham condition [36]. Other studies showed improvements in mood after brief and single instruction in mindfulness [31,32].
In summary, meditation is associated with enhancing the ability to self-regulate emotions, which has been found to be a key component in cognition [37,38], including creativity [21-23]. In the integrative reviews of creativity studies, it is proposed that PA fosters creativity fluency and originality because of enhanced cognitive flexibility, which may make more diverse connections among ideas, as well as perceive more differences among the items or content, with NA having the opposite effect [22,25]. Therefore, it is possible that short-term meditation increases capacity to self-regulate emotions and thus improves creative performance.
The present study focuses on the cognitive mechanism of meditation on creativity. Short-term IBMT, adopted from traditional Chinese medicine and incorporating the key components of meditation training, was used as a meditation intervention. Instead of using effort to control thoughts, IBMT is designed to facilitate the achievement of a meditative state with a balance and optimization between mind and body [34,39], and further maintain this state to regulate emotion [40]. On the other hand, relaxation training (RT) involves relaxing different muscle groups from the head to abdomen and forces one to concentrate on the feelings of warmth and heaviness [41]. This progressive muscle training helps a participant achieve physical (body) and mental (mind) relaxation and calmness [34,41-43]. Since both RT and IBMT emphasize achieving their desired states through regulating the body and the mind, RT matches IBMT in the training, and thus we chose RT as an active control condition. We used the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) [44] to measures PA and NA, and the TTCT [10] to assess performance of creativity. PANAS and TTCT were measured before and after training to compare the training effects between IBMT and RT. In addition, the reciprocal cross-lagged effects of PANAS (PA and NA) and TTCT were examined before and after IBMT. Cross-lagged analysis is widely recommended for addressing the issue of temporal precedence [45-48]. It helps to test whether the IBMT-regulated emotion has a causal effect on creativity and to rule out alternative causal hypotheses.
Taken together, we hypothesize that compared to RT (i) IBMT will produce greater creativity (indexed by TTCT) (ii) IBMT will improve emotion (indexed by PANAS scales) and (iii) this improved emotion may mediate the change in creativity.
Go to:
Materials and methods
Participants
Forty healthy undergraduates at Dalian University of Technology (DUT) without any meditation or relaxation experiences were recruited. They were evenly and randomly assigned to IBMT group or RT group (20:20). Nineteen participants in the IBMT group (11 males, aged 21 ± 1.6 years old) completed the whole training of 30 min/day for 7 days (3.5 hours in total). The 20 participants in the RT group (10 males, aged 21 ± 1.3 years old) were given the same amount and length of RT [41]. The study was approved by DUT Institutional Review Board and informed consent was obtained from each participant. The consent form explained that participants would complete the PANAS [44] to measure mood state, and the TTCT [10] to assess performance of creativity.
PANAS
PANAS [44] is a 20-item measure of PA (10 items) and NA (10 items). All items are rated on a Likert-type scale ranging from 1 (very slightly or not at all) to 5 (extremely). Although PANAS can be administered in terms of varying time frames, subjects responded to PANAS items on basis of to what extent they feel a certain way over the past week. The PA scales reflect the extent to which a person feels enthusiastic, active, or alert. The measure has been validated in Chinese [49]; these authors reported that Cronbach’s alphas for the PA and NA subscales were .85 and .83, respectively.
Creativity assessment
The creativity performance was assessed through TTCT [10], which has been translated into Chinese language and standardized for the usage in China [50]. TTCT has two versions: TTCT-Verbal and TTCT-Figural [51,52]. The creative scalogram in this study consists of two activities (Product Improvement, and Unusual Uses) from TTCT-Verbal and two activities (Picture Completion, and Repeated Figures of Lines) from TTCT-Figural. All participants answered the same questions. Ten minutes were required to complete each activity to generate as many answers as possible.
The four subscales, with descriptions about scoring and the content measured, are listed as following: (a) Fluency, which is the number of relevant responses to the questions, shows the ability to produce and consider many alternatives; (b) Flexibility, which is the (total) number of categories that answers are assigned based on a criteria table or an almost equivalent judgment, shows the ability to produce responses from a wide perspective; (c) Originality, which is the number of statistically infrequent ideas, shows the ability to produce ideas that differ from others’. The scoring procedure counts the most common responses as 0 and all other legitimate responses as 1. The originality lists are prepared for each item on basis of normative data, which are readily memorized by scorers. (d) Elaboration shows the ability to produce ideas in detail [51,52]. For the purpose of this article, Elaboration will not be discussed.
The raw score (fluency, flexibility, originality) in each activity is converted to T-scores according to a formula in TTCT manual [50]. Each total scale score is the sum of its T-scores in the corresponding scale of the four activities. A TTCT score is the sum of three subscales including fluency, flexibility and originality. Each subscale was rated by a single proficient scorer who was blind to the conditions of the participants.
Procedures
The experimental sessions included pre-training session, training session, and post-training session.
(i) Pre-training session. Before training, the PANAS and TTCT were administered in a group format. First, all the participants completed the PANAS. Second, To avoid the two tasks interference, after PANAS, the participants were given around 30-min break including 15-min rest and then 15-min explanation of the following TTCT tasks. Third, the TTCT was administered. During this session, the administration was performed blind by one psychology Ph.D. who mastered the TTCT [50]-[52] and PANAS. Each participant completed the tests in a partition type desk.
(ii) Training session. The training sessions were intended to help each participant to increase the meditation or relaxation experience. Both IBMT and RT group completed the 7 consecutive days of training with 30 min/per day respectively, total is 3.5 hours. The first training day occurred on a different day after finishing the pre-training session. Firstly, a qualified coach provided participants a free question-and-answer meeting about techniques (IBMT or RT). Secondly, after ensuring the clear grasp of techniques for the novices, the coach guided participants to practice instructions on a compact disc in a harmonious and relaxed atmosphere. The practice was 30 minutes. The IBMT group concentrated on achieving a balanced state of body and mind. The RT group concentrated on the relaxing of different muscle groups and the corresponding feelings of warmth and heaviness. During the practice, the coach observed facial and body cues and gave proper feedback immediately to those who were struggling with the method. Thirdly, thirty minutes later, each participant filled out a questionnaire and evaluated the practice. The coach gave short responses to subjects as required [34,42].
(iii) Post-training session. This session occurred on the next day after the final training day. The procedures of this session were consistent with the pre-session. Participants were given the PANAS firstly, and the TTCT 30 min later.
Statistical analysis
ANOVA, t tests, linear regression and a cross-lagged panel design were applied for analysis. All analyses were performed using SPSS software.
To examine the homogeneity in TTCT or PANAS between IBMT group and RT group before training, an independent t-test was used to compare the differences between two groups in mean values (TTCT or PANAS). And then, we conducted preliminary analyses using a repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVAs) method between groups on each dependent variable (TTCT or PANAS) with time as a factor. When statistically significant effects were found, the independent t-test was used to compare differences in mean values of percent changes from pre to post between two groups.
Causal relationships could be inferred by utilizing a cross-lagged panel design, in which variables are collected at least twice [53,54]. The basic results of cross-lagged analyses include a complete correlation matrix: stationarity of correlations (Csta, autocorrelations), synchronous correlations (Csyn), and cross-lagged correlations (Ccl) (Figure 1). First, to assume that a causal model based on crossed-lagged panel correlations is valid, the Csyn and Csta coefficients must be high in magnitude and statistically significant in the non-cross direction [47]. Second, for a pair of variables, A and B, the causal influence from A to B is represented by the standardized regression coefficients of the path from A at time 1 to B at time 2 (Ccl 1–2). In a similar manner, the causal influence from B to A is represented by the standardized regression coefficients of the path from B at time 1 to A at time 2 (Ccl 2–1). Thus, under the usual assumptions governing regression analysis, a nonzero value of a relevant parameter is indicative of a significant causal effect [48].
📷Figure 1
The cross-lagged panel design used to evaluate causal relationships between A and B.
All data are expressed and plotted as mean ± SE. P < .05 was considered statistically significant.
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Results
Creativity scores
Before training, the independent t-test showed no significant difference in TTCT (p > .05) between the two groups (IBMT:M = 588.950, SE = 7.486; RT:M = 587.32, SE = 11.685). ANOVAs revealed a group (IBMT vs. RT) × session (pre-training vs. post-training) interaction effect [F(1, 37) = 14.853; p < .01] and a session (pre-training vs. post-training) main effect [F(1, 37) = 36.156; p < .01] for TTCT. The follow-up t-test indicated the IBMT group obtained significantly better scores in TTCT percent change from pre to post (t(37), = 3.755; p < .01) in comparison with the RT group (Figure 2). These results indicated that short-term IBMT can yield a better creative performance than short-term RT.
📷Figure 2
Comparison of the percent change of TTCT from pre to post between IBMT group and RT group. IBMT group (blue bars). RT group (red bars). **p < .01. Error bars indicate 1 SE. A higher vertical axis shows a larger improvement of creativity performance.
Emotion scores
Before training, the independent t-test showed no significant difference in PA (p > .05) between the two groups (IBMT:M = 29.110, SE = .921; RT: M = 29.350, SE = 1.145). The ANOVAs revealed a group (IBMT vs. RT) × session (pre-training vs. post-training) interaction effect [F(1, 37) = 8.941; p < .01] and a session (pre-training vs. post-training) main effect [F(1, 37) = 11.603; p < .01] for PA. The follow-up t-test indicated the IBMT group obtained significantly better scores in PA percent change from pre to post (t(37) = 2.678; p < .05) in comparison with the RT group (Figure 3). These results suggested that short-term IBMT induces higher positive mood states than RT.
📷Figure 3
Comparison of the percent change of PA from pre to post between IBMT group and RT group. IBMT group (green bar). RT group (blue bar). *p < .05. Error bars indicate 1 SE. A higher vertical axis indicates a larger improvement of mood state.
Before training, the independent t-test showed no significant difference in NA (p > .05) between the IBMT group (M = 18.210, SE = .932) and RT group (M = 18.150, SE = .944). ANOVAs revealed a group (IBMT vs. RT) × session (pre-training vs. post-training) interaction effect [F(1, 37) = 8.271; p < .01] and a session (pre-training vs. post-training) main effect [F(1, 37) = 8.852; p < .01] for NA. The follow-up t-test indicated the IBMT group obtained significantly better scores in NA percent change from pre to post (t(37) = 2.773; p < .01) in comparison with the RT group (Figure 4). These results manifested that the short-term IBMT induced lower negative mood states than the short-term RT.
📷Figure 4
Comparison of the percent change of PA from pre to post between IBMT group and RT group. IBMT group (purple bar). RT group (red bar). **p < .01. Error bars indicate 1 SE. A lower vertical axis indicates a larger improvement of mood state.
Relationship between emotion and creativity
To explore the causal sequence between emotion and creativity for short-term training, the PANAS scores and TTCT scores of the IBMT and RT groups across pre-training and post-training sessions were analyzed with cross-lagged panel correlation.
Figure 5 (left panel) shows the Ccls between PA and TTCT in the IBMT group. First, the Csyn coefficients (r PA-before × TTCT-before = .468, r PA-after × TTCT-after = .533) and the Csta coefficients (r PA-before × PA-after = .823, r TTCT-before × TTCT-after = .591) were high in magnitude and statistically significant in the non-cross direction, which provided preliminary support for cross-lagged panel correlation. Second, the standardized regression coefficients of the path from before-training PA score to after-training TTCT score (β = .592; R2 = .351; p = 0.008) was significant. However, the standardized regression coefficients of the path from after-training PA score to before-training TTCT score (β = .399; R2 = .159; p = 0.09) was marginally significant. PA had a positive cross-lagged impact on TTCT, and that indicated a causal influence from positive mood changes to the creativity changes in IBMT group. In addition, Figure 5 (right panel) shows the Ccls between NA and TTCT in the IBMT group. First, the Csyn coefficients (r NA-before × TTCT-before = −.499, r NA-after × TTCT-after = −.633) and the Csta coefficients (r NA-before × NA-after = .705, r TTCT-before × TTCT-after = .591) were high in magnitude and statistically significant in the non-cross direction, which provided preliminary support for cross-lagged panel correlation. Second, the standardized regression coefficients of the path from before-training NA score to after-training TTCT score (β = −.654; R2 = .427; p = 0.002) was significant. However, the standardized regression coefficients of the path from after-training NA score to before-training TTCT score (β = −.256; R2 = .065; p = 0.291) was not significant. NA had a negative cross-lagged impact on TTCT, and that indicated a causal influence from negative mood changes to the creativity changes in the IBMT group.
📷Figure 5
The Cross-Lagged models for exploring the causal sequence between PANAS and TTCT of IBMT group. The Cross-Lagged models for exploring the causal sequence between PA score and TTCT score (left panel) and between NA score and TTCT score (right panel) of the IBMT group before and after training. Ellipses indicate measured variables; Arrows depict hypothesized directional or “causal” links/associations; Numbers above or near measured variables represent the correlations. Spearman’s correlation coefficient and the standardized regression coefficient are used and estimates are statistically significant at *p < .05 and **p < .01.
Figure 6 (left panel) shows the Ccls between PA and TTCT in the RT group. As a preliminary analysis step, Csyn coefficient (r PA-before × TTCT-before = .457) presented to be significant, whereas Csyn coefficient (r PA-after × TTCT-after = .413) was not significant, suggesting that Csyn coefficient did not support cross-lagged panel correlation. Thus, positive mood changes were not the cause of the creativity changes found in the short-term RT group. In addition, Figure 6 (right panel) shows the Ccls between NA and TTCT in RT group. As a preliminary analysis step, Csyn coefficient (r NA-before × TTCT-before = −.487) presented to be significant, whereas Csyn coefficient (r NA-after × TTCT-after = −.424) was not significant, suggesting that Csyn coefficient did not support cross-lagged panel correlation. Thus, negative mood changes were not the cause of the creativity changes found in the short-term RT group.
📷Figure 6
The Cross-Lagged models for exploring the causal sequence between PANAS and TTCT of RT group.The Cross-Lagged models for exploring the causal sequence between PA score and TTCT score (left panel) and between NA score and TTCT score (right panel) of the RT group before and after training.
To summarize, the cross-lagged analyses indicated that both positive and negative mood changes may contribute to the creativity changes in the short-term IBMT group, but not in the RT group.
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Discussion
Consistent with our previous research [19], the IBMT group significantly outperformed the RT group in TTCT scores after training. TTCT is used to evaluate creativity through divergent thinking [55], which is a key aspect of creativity and predictor of creative ability [56]. We concluded that creative performance on the divergent thinking task was better following IBMT than RT. Thus, the results are consistent with our hypotheses. The improvement of creativity may be caused by a variety of factors. Previous studies have shown that there may be a wealth of psychological factors, such as intelligence, self-confidence, attention, cognitive flexibility [57] and mood states [21,22,25,26] with regard to the influence on creative fluency and originality.
In the PANAS, the PA score (assessed by PA subscale) increased significantly and the NA score (by NA subscale) decreased significantly after 3.5 hours of IBMT compared to RT. We concluded that short-term IBMT yielded a better emotion state than RT. Thus, the results are consistent with our hypotheses that the IBMT group improved emotional regulation, whereas RT group did not.
Moreover, we hypothesized that emotional improvement may be one way that TTCT scores are changed in short-term meditation. Our results revealed that the cross-lagged analysis documented PA and NA as an antecedent of creativity in the IBMT group. The standardized regression coefficients of the path from before-training PA (or NA) to after-training TTCT was significant, while the standardized regression coefficients of the path from after-training PA (or NA) to before-training TTCT was marginally significant. However, similar effects of emotion on creativity were not found in the RT group. Our results indicated that emotion-based creativity-promoting mechanism is attributed to IBMT.
Creativity includes a wide range of cognitive processes, such as flow (when a person is fully immersed in what s/he is doing, characterized by a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and success in the process of the activity) [58], breadth of attention [59], and remote association of ideas [1]. However, emotion is associated with these cognitive processes that contribute to the complex of creativity [21,22,25,26]. One mood theory is that PA promotes a more global scope of attention [60,61], enhancing access to distant or unusual associations [62,63], which facilitates creative solutions to classic creative problems such as improving performance [64] on the Remote Associates Test [65]. Another mood theory is that PA enhances switching between global and local attention modes [66] or between strategies [67], or in other words that it enhances selection of different perspectives [27]. In contrast, NA states such as anxiety and depression are associated with deficits in attentional and cognitive control mechanisms [68,69], often inducing a narrow scope of attention [70]. Therefore, NA states should impede cognitive flexibility and creative problem solving.
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Conclusions
Taken together, these results support our hypothesis that creative performance on the divergent thinking task and emotion were better following IBMT than RT, and meditation with mood regulation effects have potential benefit to levels of creativity. Our study may open up an important avenue for research into the relationships between meditation - emotion - creativity.
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Abbreviations
PANAS: Positive and negative affect schedule; TTCT: Torrance tests of creative thinking; IBMT: Integrative body-mind training; RT: Relaxation training; PA: Positive affect; NA: Negative affect; DUT: Dalian University of technology; Csta: Stationarity of correlations; Csyn: Synchronous correlations; Ccl: Cross-lagged correlations; ANOVA: Analysis of variance; SE: Standard error mean.
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Competing interests
The authors declare that they have no competing interests.
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Authors’ contributions
YYT and MIP designed and supervised the study. XQD contributed to data acquisition, analysis and interpretation. YYT, MIP, RXT and XQD drafted and revised the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.
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Acknowledgements
This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research.
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Question
What Decide the direction of creativity policies of a country?
Does PEST (political ,Economical ,Social and Technological ) condition and needs give new demands for creativity ?
should it be the UN code of creative development?
thank you for your comments,
here i wanted to clear rather than confuse.
Till you are doing something to succeed as an individual , its a fine quality and abality , but as soon as you try to put others down and succeed, that becomes an attitude and habbit to show others down. and that can be sickness.
Question
IS pampering a child - indicator factor of parental fostering creativity behaviour ?
Question
Creativity First,
Education Second, and
Innovation Third.
do you agree with me .what are your views. please share.
best regards
" Imitating the Creative idea technique " be used for fostering creativity and training in creativity ? e.g .Art and craft teacher would demonstrate a creative idea and working on it, the whole class imitates the creative idea , ?
can this techinque be used for fostering creativity and training of kids. if it needs refinement , pl. suggest. is it similar to leading by examples. and can it work well ? to what stage.
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Creative workforce is the key to sustainable competitive advantage as it facilitates innovation and supports the development of new avenues and better prospects for business. The proportion of ‘creative class’ in the economy has to be increased to usher the path of economic prosperity and sustainable living. the teacher’s creativity nurturing behav...
What are some ways then, as educators, that we promote creativity in our classrooms?
1. Embrace creativity as part of learning. Create a classroom that recognizes creativity. You may want to design awards or bulletin boards to showcase different ways of solving a problem, or creative solutions to a real world scenario.
2. Use the most effective strategies. Torrance performed an extensive meta-analysis that considered the most effective ways to teach creativity. He found that the most successful approaches used creative arts, media-oriented programs, or relied on the Osborn-Parnes training program. Programs that incorporated cognitive and emotional functioning were the most successful.
3. Think of creativity as a skill. Much like resourcefulness and inventiveness it is less a trait and more a proficiency that can be taught. If we see it this way, our job as educators becomes to find ways to encourage its use and break it down into smaller skill sets. Psychologists tend to think of creativity as Big-C and Little C. Big C drives big societal ideas, like the Civil Rights movement or a new literary style. Little C is more of a working model of creativity that solves everyday problems. Both concepts can be included in our classrooms to promote creativity in general.
4. Participate in or create a program to develop creative skills. Programs like Odyssey of the Mind and Thinkquestbring together students from around the world to promote creativity, design creative solutions, and bring them to competition.
5. Use emotional connections. Research suggests that the best creativity instruction ties in the emotions of the learner. In the “Odyssey angels” program students can devise a solution to help their local community, such as helping homeless youth. This topic is worthy of more discussion by itself. A blog postby fellow blogger Julie DeNeen gives some valuable information about this type of teaching.
Research suggests that the best creativity instruction ties in the emotions of the learner.
6. Use a creativity model. The Osborne-Parnes model is oldest, widely accepted model. It is often used in education and business improvement to promote creativity. Each step involves a divergent thinking pattern to challenge ideas, and then convergent thinking to narrow down exploration. It has six steps:
o Mess-finding. Identify a goal or objective.
o Fact-finding. Gathering data.
o Problem-finding. Clarifying the problem
o Idea-finding. Generating ideas
o Solution-finding. Strengthening & evaluating ideas
o Acceptance-finding. Plan of action for Implementing ideas
7. Consider how classroom assignments use divergent and convergent thinking. Standardized tests do a great job of measuring convergent thinking that includes analytical thinking or logical answers with one correct response. Divergent thinking considers how a learner can use different ways to approach a problem. It requires using association and multiplicity of thought. We should design assignments that consider both types of thinking models.
8. Creativity flourishes in a “congenial environment”.Creative thinking needs to be shared and validated by others in a socially supportive atmosphere. Researcher Csikszentmihalyi (1996) coined this term, to explain the importance of reception from others. Others consider how to create social communities that promote creativity to solve problems.
9. Be aware during discussions. You know that student who often asks the question that goes a bit outside the lecture? Well, engage him. Once a week, intentionally address those questions. Write them down on an assigned space in the board to go back to later. Promote creativity by validating students’ creative thinking.
10. See creativity in a positive light. In his blog in Psychology Today, Eric Jaffe talks about research that suggests see creativity in a negative light. If we are going to promote creativity, we need to embrace it too. Reward students for thinking of problems in varied ways by recognizing their efforts.
11. Try the Incubation Model. E. Paul Torrance designed this model. It involves 3 stages:
1. Heightening Anticipation: Make connections between the classroom and student’s real lives. “Create the desire to know”.
2. Deepen Expectations: Engage the curriculum in new ways. Brainstorm and create opportunities to solve a novel problem.
3. Keep it going: Continue the thinking beyond the lesson or classroom. Find ways to extend learning opportunities at home or even the community.
12. Use a cultural artifact. Research from experimental social psychology finds that artifacts can enhance insight problem solving. Consider using an ordinary object, such as a light bulb used in the study or a historical artifact to have students think about living in a particular time period.
13. Establish expressive freedom. The classroom environment must be a place where students feel safe to share novel ideas. Allow for flexibility and create norms that promote creativity.
14. Be familiar with standards. Knowing the standards inside and out helps find creative solutions in approaching a lesson. Teachers can adapt them and work within the current framework. Some topics allow for flexibility and use of creative approaches.
15. Gather outside resources. There are some great resources to read related to creativity. The University of Georgia, provides an array of amazing resources related to how to promote creativity in practical ways. It also gives a list of programs and organizations that can help with the process.
16. Allow room for mistakes. Sir Ken Robinson said it best when he said, “If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original.”
17. Allow space for creativity. Design some classroom space for exploration, such as a thinking table, a drama stage, a drawing table, or a space for groups to discuss ideas.
18. Give students time to ask questions. Organizations such as CCE (Creativity, Culture, Education) suggest teachers incorporate opportunities for students to ask questions. Intentionally design lessons that allow for wondering and exploration.
19. Creativity builds confidence. Students take ownership of their own learning. Think of ways where students might design a project. For instance, for the history requirement, I suggested students of both fifth grade classes create an exhibition of their final projects. The students were so proud of their final work and learned from others presentations. Parents and community members were happy to see students take ownership of their learning.
20. Encourage curiosity.Consider what is important to students. Student interest is a great place to start on what drives their own thinking tank. Find inspiration from their world. Creativity is intrinsic in nature. Try to promote creativity by stepping into their viewpoint to find what motivates them.
Student interest are a great place to start on what drives their own thinking tank. Find inspiration from their world.
21. Structure is essential. Studies, such as a meta-analysis by Torrance suggest that creativity instruction is best with clear structure. For instance, consider the guidelines of the standard curriculum objectives and add these to the design. For example, reading considers communication, comprehension, listening, writing and reading.
22. Observe a working model of creativity. To get a better idea of how others promote creativity, visit a creative classroom or watch a video about how a creative classroom works. The “Case for Creativity in School” is an excellent video that educators can watch to see how creativity might play out in a classroom. This school adopted a school-wide approach to recognize students.
23. Consider the work of current experts in the field. Sir Ken Robinson is an internationally renowed creativity and innovation expert. His work is used to meet global challenges, renovating education, business, and government organizations to implement his strategies. His books and TED talks are great places to promote creativity in your own teaching.
24. Explore different cultures. Culture is an excellent vehicle for inspiring creative thinking. In Thinking Hats & Coloured Turbans Dr. Kirpal Singh discusses how cultural contexts are central to creative endeavors. You can discuss how collaboration between cultures, such as in the space program, produces unique, novel ideas.
25. Find ways to incorporate and integrate art, music and culture. A recent report prepared for the European commission considered that creativity is a central force that shapes our culture. With the changing times we live in, the report suggested that society is enriched by cultural-based creativity.
26. Use a collaborative creative thinking model to solve classroom problems. For instance, read a paragraph and then have groups discuss a list of questions. Collaborative problem solving is catching on quickly. In fact, many business schools have implemented creative thinking models into their curriculum.
27. Design multidisciplinary lessons when possible. When teaching geometry, I designed a lesson called, “Geometry through Art”. It included works of Art to show fifth graders their application to everyday geometric concepts. The result was astounding. I never thought that the subject matter would be so successful. I designed an entire unit that focused on how different concepts rely on geometry. I even asked the Art teacher to help reinforce those concepts in class.
28. Tapping into multiple intelligences is key. Creativity requires us to use different parts of our brain. We often bridge connections between seemingly unrelated areas to make new concepts emerge. Allow students to use their strengths to find new ways of approaching a topic or solving a problem. You might be surprised with what they come up with.
29. Understand that creativity is important to students’ future in the job market. Paul Collard for Creative Partnerships, discusses how 60% of English students will work in jobs that are not yet created. In today’s market, students must largely be innovative and create their own jobs. Collard suggests teachers focus on teaching particular skills or set of behaviors, rather than preparing students for specific careers.
30. Teach creative skills explicitly. According to Collard, “Creative skills aren’t just about good ideas, they are about having the skills to make good ideas happen.” He suggests creative skills should include 5 major areas:
o Imagination
o Being disciplined or self-motivated.
o Resiliency
o Collaboration
o Giving responsibility to students. Have them develop their own projects.
The question interests me as it is some what we have been researching for last 2 years.
Debra Sharon Ferdinand-James and Jermaine Dunn , already suggested some of the good ideas.
to me if i have to think about how to enhance the critical thinking in kids inschool-?
raises following questions:
Age of subjects in class
Interest of the subjects in a particular area.
The creativity nurturing behaviour of the teacher in class.
The Training of the teachers.
The environment of the class.
The School's policy towards Creativity fostering.
The time given to individual for thinking to do a task/ answer a question.
Appropriate creative potential scale to measure creativity from time to time again.
once we throughly prepare a detailed requirement based on above things , it becomes easier to enhance creativity and critical thinking .
 A teacher should always try to sharpen the skills of the students instead of just focusing on the text book. It needs a variety of plans and activities which should be designed according to the mental level of the students. Sometimes we need different activity for different students of the same class.
The main objective behind it remains the same; improvement of the skills in students. The best things for it are visual learning and short creative assignments.
The teachers must use different platforms and media to open their minds and allow they to feel secure in that fact that there are no right or wrong answers - that is the process of learning.
To provide learners with complete nourishing learning diet, part of the meal should be assigned for problem solving and critical thinking,and  usually this is only possible, when they are involved in tasks that require the skill: it could be theoretical,e.g mathematics ,geometry or a critique, .... or practical, simple practical, such as the arrangements in the classroom, the arrangement and preparation for an event or big academic projects.
field trips that can be assigned to take these kids out and let them see for themselves. For example a field trip to the museum of arts can show these kids that painters and artists didn't paint the normal portraits nor did they have to. Anything can be art depending on how you look at it. Teacher plays a role in how these kids learn to perceive art. Critical thinking is involved as well.
Training the teachers - A Key Issue in the areas.
We have been working on Worldwide validation ofcreativity.
if you are interested you may get connected.
best regards
Sandy
Dear Boutheina
The question interests me as it is some what we have been researching for last 2 years.
Debra Sharon Ferdinand-James and Jermaine Dunn , already suggested some of the good ideas.
to me if i have to think about how to enhance the critical thinking in kids inschool-?
raises following questions:
Age of subjects in class
Interest of the subjects in a particular area.
The creativity nurturing behaviour of the teacher in class.
The Training of the teachers.
The environment of the class.
The School's policy towards Creativity fostering.
The time given to individual for thinking to do a task/ answer a question.
Appropriate creative potential scale to measure creativity from time to time again.
once we throughly prepare a detailed requirement based on above things , it becomes easier to enhance creativity and critical thinking .
 A teacher should always try to sharpen the skills of the students instead of just focusing on the text book. It needs a variety of plans and activities which should be designed according to the mental level of the students. Sometimes we need different activity for different students of the same class.
The main objective behind it remains the same; improvement of the skills in students. The best things for it are visual learning and short creative assignments.
The teachers must use different platforms and media to open their minds and allow they to feel secure in that fact that there are no right or wrong answers - that is the process of learning.
To provide learners with complete nourishing learning diet, part of the meal should be assigned for problem solving and critical thinking,and  usually this is only possible, when they are involved in tasks that require the skill: it could be theoretical,e.g mathematics ,geometry or a critique, .... or practical, simple practical, such as the arrangements in the classroom, the arrangement and preparation for an event or big academic projects.
field trips that can be assigned to take these kids out and let them see for themselves. For example a field trip to the museum of arts can show these kids that painters and artists didn't paint the normal portraits nor did they have to. Anything can be art depending on how you look at it. Teacher plays a role in how these kids learn to perceive art. Critical thinking is involved as well.
Training the teachers - A Key Issue in the areas.
We have been working on Worldwide validation of creativity.
if you are interested you may get connected.
best regards
Sandy
creativity in a simple term dependent on 4 factors, and i want to put it as a equation as under:
Creativity = Surprise + Originality + Beauty + Utility
According to this theory, six distinct, but related elements contribute to successful creativity: intelligence, knowledge, thinking styles, personality, motivation, and environment.
now Tourism ,
Tourism Description:
Tourism is travel for pleasure or business; also the theory and practice of touring, the business of attracting, accommodating, and entertaining tourists, and the business of operating tours. Tourism may be international, or within the traveller's country.
implies Creative tourism studies:--
The concept of Creative Tourism appeared in the 2000′s, and is defined as a: “Tourism which offers visitors the opportunity to develop. their creative potential through active participation in courses. and learning experiences, which are characteristic. of the holiday destination where they are taken.”
Tourism that offers visitors a creative pursuit (including arts, crafts and cookery workshops), with the opportunity to stay in high quality accommodation, and to connect with local people in a distinctive destination.’
Research indicates that people want more time, space and energy, and a greater sense of wellbeing.  They are demonstrating a growing desire to connect with each other and feel more in touch with local communities. Some of this can be achieved through creative tourism as it provides visitors with the opportunity to learn a new skill, provide a sense of achievement and to create a unique souvenir, for example, a painting, crafted object or food product.  This type of break is also more likely to give people a lasting emotional attachment to the destination and will encourage them to recommend and also revisit the destination.
Even with the current downturn in the economy many people still feel that a holiday is fundamental and a destination that offers the opportunity to learn something at the same time as providing a change of scene will gain a competitive edge.
Because I live in and am passionate about encouraging more people to discover Kent, particularly Kent’s coast  I am  working with creative people and interesting venues on the coast, to encourage them to develop creative workshops. These will be promoted through  through  the Kent’s Creative Coast campaign and via twitter.
I organised 4 ‘Escapes’ in Whitstable as part of the research and development for the campaign Kent’s Creative Coast campaign and if you would like me to help you develop creative tourism in your town, region or county please do contact me catriona@createinkent.co.uk
If you are interested in developing workshops for the visitor market I would also love to hear from you and am particularly interested in;
  • Visual artists for watercolour, pastel and oil painting
  • Sculptors
  • Potters
  • Metalworkers
  • Jewellers
  • Furniture makers
  • Glassmakers
  • Wood carvers
  • Craftspeople for knitting, textiles, weaving, embroidery
  • Traditional Kentish crafts e.g. beer making, decorating with hops
  • Chefs cooking with local Kent produce, e.g. oysters, mussels, fish, food foraged in the Kent countryside
  • Food producers for cheese making, cooking with apples etc.
  • Vineyards for  winemaking, farms/orchards for cider, apple juice
a good link is :
if you are further interested in colloborative paper , please do write to me.
Sandy
Question
IS Self-Expression in kids the first step towards nurturing creativity?
Keith Jones , thank you so very much for your link. it will be ofcourse very useful.
best regards
Question
Does " Non Availability of Resources /Lack of Resources and motivation within, to do" sparks creativity ?
Emergent creativity by applied improvisation.
Deliberate Co-Creativity-intentional co-creativity of creative coloboration.
plays and drama- in nurturing creativitty
memory induction
Question
What bothers a researcher the most ? is it a problem ? is it an idea ?
is it an Deadline of completion ?
or something else ?
Data
Measuring Teachers creativity nurturing behaviour: preparing studnets for life andwork in the 21st century How do we nurture creativity in students in preparing them for life and work in the 21st Century? The answer to this question is gaining much attention by educational practitioners and researchers as “creativity” as a skill is essential to sec...
Question
why do the teachers want to confine to the practice they follow for teaching and dont want to indulge in creativity upgradation?
What are the things responsible for the lack of motivation in case of Creative upgradation of teachers ?
please add the points you think are responsible for this ?
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Measuring Teachers creativity nurturing behaviour: preparing studnets for life andwork in the 21st century How do we nurture creativity in students in preparing them for life and work in the 21st Century? The answer to this question is gaining much attention by educational practitioners and researchers as “creativity” as a skill is essential to se...
Thank you
Hobbies are the act where you have no pressure to bring in results, and you are ready for the changes in the outcome of the act, and that is the difference when you work professional assignment on creativity, you are being checked and watched upon for the process you follows, the resources you take , the time you consume to complete a task of creativity.
Thank you once again for your answer.
Best
Sandy
Question
what is more important for the creativity and innovation- Selfbelief or belief in God/The supreme power ?
Question
Is Environment around us plays the most significant role /the key role to development of Applied creativity ? What about our thoughts within ?
Question
creativity ideas struck to me more in my hobbies areas or Professional area or education area?
please provide me your answer?
Question
IS COMPETETIVENESS A SICKNESS ? wHY ?
Competetiveness is defined as the The abality to Succeed relative to others ?
Till you are doing something to succeed as an individual , its a fine quality and abality , but as soon as you try to put others down and succeed, that becomes an attitude and habbit to show others down. and that can be sickness.
what is your opinion on this ? please do write your expert opinion.
@christiane and Britta Boyer
i also agree with your opinion on that . thank you for participating and your valuable point of view.
best regards and wishes
Question
motivation behind creativity upgradation of the teachers ?
@Kia-Stefanie Lorimer
Thank you for adding a reply. In fact I agree with you.
Further we even want to check whether the teachers have the creativity learning/nurturing behaviour of teachers by using our scale.
We are open to collaborating with you for research on the same,under our creativity project.
Awaiting your reply.
With best regards
Sandy
Question
what role can networking play in an institute /individual module with respect to creativity.
please provide me your expert views. thank you.
Question
Ways to align back the track of lost creativity development program/ project for education sector and teachers.
i request you to kindly give your expert views.
Question
"Drop one new idea(s) in the Creativity-conference dropbox before you leave the venue of conference"
what is your view on this new creativity development strategy in creativity conference.
Question
bulging stomach indicates ?
how to trreat it ?
Question
what are the cause of Non functional Intestine and how is the deficiency of certain metabolic substances treated ?
Question
How can we remove the sludge from the gall bladder so that they dont form stone ?
Question
How many researcher regularly check the research question added on research gate?
Thank you for your answer, i wish we jointly work on some creativity work.
sandy
Question
Can "Self-praise" be used as a Motivation Technique ?
Question
Nature inspires artists. Can stays near NATURE be used as Techniques to develop Creative ideation in Individuals ?
what is your expert opinion.
Question
can "Prashnootrri" techniques be used as one of the tools for enhancing the creativity in kids ?
Question
Does Yoga Impacts The Creativity ? How ? your point of view please?
YOGA - a Hindu spiritual and ascetic discipline, a part of which, including breath control, simple meditation, and the adoption of specific bodily postures, is widely practised for health and relaxation.
1. Easy Seated Pose-Padmaasan
2. Sun Salutations-Suryanamaskar
3. Pigeon Pose-
4. Wheel Pose-chakraasan
5. Headstand-shirshasan
6. Child’s Pose
Question
does creativity always needs a problem to solve ?
or one can be aimlessly creative ?
What hinders engagement and participation in , and openness to innovation and creativity, also innovation and creativity exercises?
hindrances:
  • Lack Of Direction From Yourself or Others. ...(internal Motivation lacks)
  • Being Afraid of Failure. ...
  • Being Afraid of Rejection. ...
  • Never Changing or Adapting to the Situation. ...
  • Not Thinking Proactively. ...
  • You Rationalize and Never Improve.
(Why) are all (not) willing to participate in innovation and creativity (exercises)?
Fear is typically cited, but this construct can be broken down further. Fear of what and why is it not overcome?
people are not willing to participate in innovation and creativity exercises- and you have cited one reason is fear .Fear of failure , fear of rejection and fear/weak self belief. could be the some of the many reasons.Why we are not able to overcome it-
Are there other factors besides fear?
fear is opposite of internal motivation.
think of other factors needed for creativity, and the opposite will be the answer to your question of other factors.
Question
Creativity and innovation -nurturing lab- the tools ,techniques and practices we should have in it ?
what is your tools, technique or practice to advice the lab ?
The question interests me as it is some what we have been researching for last 2 years.
Debra Sharon Ferdinand-James and Jermaine Dunn , already suggested some of the good ideas.
to me if i have to think about how to enhance the critical thinking in kids inschool-?
raises following questions:
Age of subjects in class
Interest of the subjects in a particular area.
The creativity nurturing behaviour of the teacher in class.
The Training of the teachers.
The environment of the class.
The School's policy towards Creativity fostering.
The time given to individual for thinking to do a task/ answer a question.
Appropriate creative potential scale to measure creativity from time to time again.
once we throughly prepare a detailed requirement based on above things , it becomes easier to enhance creativity and critical thinking .
 A teacher should always try to sharpen the skills of the students instead of just focusing on the text book. It needs a variety of plans and activities which should be designed according to the mental level of the students. Sometimes we need different activity for different students of the same class.
The main objective behind it remains the same; improvement of the skills in students. The best things for it are visual learning and short creative assignments.
The teachers must use different platforms and media to open their minds and allow they to feel secure in that fact that there are no right or wrong answers - that is the process of learning.
To provide learners with complete nourishing learning diet, part of the meal should be assigned for problem solving and critical thinking,and  usually this is only possible, when they are involved in tasks that require the skill: it could be theoretical,e.g mathematics ,geometry or a critique, .... or practical, simple practical, such as the arrangements in the classroom, the arrangement and preparation for an event or big academic projects.
field trips that can be assigned to take these kids out and let them see for themselves. For example a field trip to the museum of arts can show these kids that painters and artists didn't paint the normal portraits nor did they have to. Anything can be art depending on how you look at it. Teacher plays a role in how these kids learn to perceive art. Critical thinking is involved as well.
Training the teachers - A Key Issue in the areas.
laughter as a technique to enhance creativity .
Innovative and creative discussions, that builds on innovative culture and atmosphere.
The tools is any related software or conventionally help to build up your creativity, technique or practice is the understanding process of creativity and lastly is to execute your creativity into something innovative. All of this discipline might be the -nurturing lab- toward we should have in it.
Any innovation should be oriented:
1. To solve any problem for which potential demand exists or may exist.
2. Or an innovation that can perform such a new function, which may be in demand.
Therefore, such a type of laboratory should have the skills and tools to identify the main problems and the algorithm to solve them, or to transform these problems into a benefit in the first case.
In the second case, possess or train the abilities ahead of existing needs and find non-existent but very promising functions.
Relatively speaking, the atmosphere in such a laboratory should be similar to the soil where the seeds, soil and micro climate are chosen specifically, while it is so flexible that it could be suitable for any plants.
I very much wish to create such a school and laboratory, I am the author of many inventions, the authors of the book “Advantage Management” in Georgian, but for this I do not have other necessary resources.
Emergent creativity by applied improvisation. Deliberate Co-Creativity-intentional co-creativity of creative coloboration. plays and drama- in nurturing creativitty memory induction
We have been working on Worldwide validation ofcreativity.
if you are interested you may get connected.
best regards
Sandy
Question
can laughter and humor be used as one of the many techniques, for enhancing creativity in kids ? how will it impact on creativity education ?
Question
can laughter be one of the tools for the creativity and imagination?
Thank you for a very positive point in the answer.can we colloborate on this research-Laughter and Creativity , if this topic interests you. ?
best wishes
Sandy
Question
Consistent-learning zone-
how can we create one ?
Question
most of us if given a task , want to complete with the tried and tested means , resources& acts ? true, what is creativity expert's perception ?
Question
how can you facilitate risk-taking ideation in the classroom ? please suggest your expert views ?
one way to facilitate risk-taking ideation is to set up a “consistent-learning zone” within the classroom. This way, students are less focussed on the idea of being right, and more interested in the idea of creating new ideas. This zone also consolidates the idea that we are always learning and growing.
Question
Does regular meditation not only mitigates stress but also helps participants develop ability to switch off their fight-or-flight responses & engage in a more thoughtful, creative mode of thinking. This is known as divergent thinking. ?
Harvard research says. give your understanding on the same.
Question
creativity thrives when it is socially-engaged—which makes the classroom a perfect breeding ground for innovative and creative teaching. your views.
Question
Is creativity independent of subjects taught in school ?
like we have drawing , craft, physical training classes which do not enhances any subject knowledge but it builts a better skill that is body and mind stimulating, this helps in all subjects .
what is your views.
yes agree with what you said. thank you for reply.
i just saw your Profile , its similar insterest areas.
will you be interested in a joint paper. we are already working on creativity validation worldwide, in that series we can work on the Creativity nurturing behaviour of spaininsh teachers in spain? we have the scale developed and published in 2018, for the same and we also have a spainsh translated online scale ready, if you are interested you can volunteer the data collection from te3achers there in Spain. and we can do the the paper further . please think and reply?
best regards
Sandy
Question
education “takes us into this future that we can’t grasp,” and thus creativity is an essential part of problem-solving for the future. ? your views pl
Question
Do School Kills Creativity ?
Question
Whose quote is this - Nothing is permanent in this world ,not even tears?
Question
which factor or creativity is most difficult to assess/examine ?
flexibility, or originality or ...... or ........
Thank you for adding your perception about teaching and learning creativity in teachers.
thanl you for adding your receipe for Cup of creativity. this is a good discussion that is comming out of creativity.
best
Sandy
in order to answer , we take first Creative problems solving teaching and instruction : we need to instruct and teach -
  • Clarify and identify the problem. Arguably the single most important step of CPS is identifying your real problem or goal. ...
  • Research the problem. ...
  • Formulate one or more creative challenges. ...
  • Generate ideas. ...
  • Combine and evaluate ideas. ...
  • Draw up an action plan. ...
  • Do it!
  • in order to answer second part , we take - innovation teaching and instruction:
Innovative Teaching Strategies that Improve Student Engagement. Inquiry-Based Learning. Inquiry-based learning is one of the most powerful teaching strategies in the classroom because research tells us that students learn best when they construct their own meaning. QR Codes. Project-Based Learning.
Examples of innovative approaches in teaching and learning include:
  • Classroom and course management innovations, including new ways of teaching that promote student engagement, reorganization of a course(s) that improves students’ ability to apply what they learn, course content that clarifies historical changes in theory, novel assignments that lead to increased student engagement, student publications, and/or activities that bring students from diverse backgrounds together.
  • Leadership in innovation that forges new paths and inspires others within and beyond the institution, including mentoring colleagues about innovative approaches, working in administrative and service positions to promote innovation, actively participating in committees to promote or create innovation and other pathways that enhance learning.
  • Championing new visions of teaching excellence through the scholarship of teaching and learning, including professional contributions to discussions, presentations, newsletters, publications, and other modes for sharing innovation.
In previous years, the adjudicators for this award have adopted a broad interpretation of teaching and learning innovation and have recognized that innovative approaches can also be discipline specific. An approach in one discipline could be very innovative, yet at the same time be potentially less innovative in another.
A good application should contextualize the innovative approaches. It should help the adjudicators understand how the approach, strategies, practices, etc. are innovative.
Evidence of Impact
This is an important aspect of the application. The Innovation in Teaching and Learning is designed to support practices that are impactful on learning. The application should include tangible evidence documenting and supporting the impact and effectiveness of the innovation(s). More weight will be given to actual evidence than general statements of opinion or praise that it is unsubstantiated. Evidence could include feedback from learners (quantitative and qualitative), research data and analysis, student rating of instruction, or measures of change in student achievement and success rates.
A description of past awards related to innovation and letters from past students can also be helpful, but will not be weighted as heavily as direct evidence.
When presenting an innovative approach in the application dossier, applicants should be sure to include the following about his or her innovation:
  • The original and evolving goals of the innovation(s).
  • A brief description of the innovation(s).
  • The underlying philosophy and strategies used to guide, implement and refine the innovation(s).
  • A context in which the innovation(s) was conceived and applied.
Question
how is Negligence related to creativity ?
Question
what type of mindset is required to see opportunities in the problems ? what is the creative outcome of the situation ?
Question
Are Problems and opportunities two sides of the same coin ?what is impact of creative mind set on it ?
dear Brain Banard,
Spiritual intelligence is the set of abilities that individuals use to apply, manifest and embody spiritual resources, values and qualities in ways that enhance their daily functioning and well-being. With both these intelligences happening in theworkplace, the environment will be more conducive.
The results of theanother study provide evidence that emotional intelligence positive and significant effect on work enthusiasm. High spiritual intelligence in the same direction but did not significantly affect the increase in the work enthusiasm. Emotional intelligence has an insignificant effect on auditor performance.
please have a look at the following:
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b2fd/e785042920490a5430460cd0675f91fdc496.pdf
yes there is a link .infact i put the question as - how does the two fosterer in life of a kid- The teachers in school and the parents at home , and their fostering style will shape up the intensity of aggression in a child/student. you can take up few articles on the topic for relevance of the study.
efforts in teaching not getting recognition in students and institution - could be one of the biggest reason for demotivation.
Question
unacceptable -"the Defeat" ?
how does this attitude motivates you as a researcher ?
Question
what impacts me the most as a researcher ? A motivating or demotivating factor(s) noticed quietly?
Question
sustainable tool for researcher-"internal motivation to work and complete the work" ?
please give your expert comments on the same.
thank you for appreciating.
further William i saw your interest areas , and they are strikingly coinciding with my interest.
this has encouraged me to write to you , does analyzing creativity nurturing behavior of teachers , - interests you ?
if yes , will you be interested in joint work. infact we are already working on such a project on a worldwide scale.
we have developed a scale for analyzing this creativity nurturing behavior and are working on validating in your country -Canada , could be the possible joint work we can have ?
awaiting your reply .
best regards
Sandy