Sanaz Talaifar

Sanaz Talaifar
Imperial College London | Imperial

About

24
Publications
16,505
Reads
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713
Citations
Citations since 2017
22 Research Items
699 Citations
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Introduction
Sanaz Talaifar currently works at Stanford University in the Graduate School of Business.

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
Individuals who are “strongly fused” with a group view the group as self-defining. As such, they should be particularly reluctant to leave it. For the first time, we investigate the implications of identity fusion for university retention. We found that students who were strongly fused with their university (+1 SD) were 7–9% points more likely than...
Preprint
Full-text available
All too often, people who develop exceptionally astute insights into others remain mysterious to these others. Evidence for such asymmetric understanding comes from several independent domains. Striking asymmetries occur among those who differ in status and power, such that low status, low power individuals understand more than they are understood....
Article
As ordinary citizens increasingly moderate online forums, blogs, and their own social media feeds, a new type of censoring has emerged wherein people selectively remove opposing political viewpoints from online contexts. In three studies of behavior on putative online forums, supporters of a political cause (e.g., abortion or gun rights) preferenti...
Chapter
App usage data provide some of the most psychologically rich information one can collect using mobile sensing methods. Here, we discuss how data from the applications ( “apps”) people use to enhance the functionality of their mobile devices can advance research in all subdisciplines of psychology. First, we describe prior psychological work on app...
Article
Full-text available
We evaluate how features of the digital environment free or constrain the self. Based on the current empirical literature, we argue that modern technological features, such as predictive algorithms and tracking tools, pose four potential obstacles to the freedom of the self: lack of privacy and anonymity, (dis)embodiment and entrenchment of social...
Preprint
Research on the effects of social media on wellbeing has been equivocal. Social media impacts people’s wellbeing indifferent ways, but relatively little is known about why this is the case. Here we introduce the construct of “Social Media Sensitivity” to understand how social media’s effects on wellbeing differs across people and the contexts in wh...
Article
Full-text available
While a great deal is known about the individual difference factors associated with conspiracy beliefs, much less is known about the country-level factors that shape people’s willingness to believe conspiracy theories. In the current article we discuss the possibility that willingness to believe conspiracy theories might be shaped by the perception...
Article
Full-text available
Since Trump was elected U.S. President in 2016, researchers have sought to explain his support, with some focusing on structural factors (e.g., economics) and others focusing on psychological factors (e.g., negative emotions). We integrate these perspectives in a regional analysis of 18+ structural variables capturing economic, demographic, and hea...
Article
Full-text available
In 1875, Fyodor Dostoyevsky proposed that an individual’s laughter grants special insight into their character. To evaluate this conjecture, we showed video clips of 89 targets laughing and not laughing to unacquainted independent observers, who recorded their impressions of the targets’ Big Five personality traits. We correlated the observers’ per...
Article
Full-text available
What are the things that we think matter morally, and how do societal factors influence this? To date, research has explored several individual-level and historical factors that influence the size of our ‘moral circles.' There has, however, been less attention focused on which societal factors play a role. We present the first multi-national explor...
Preprint
What are the things that we think matter morally, and how do societal factors influence this? To date, research has explored several individual-level and historical factors that influence the size of our ‘moral circles’. There has, however, been less attention focused on which societal factors play a role. We present the first multi-national explor...
Preprint
Since Trump was elected U.S. President in 2016, researchers have sought to explain his support, with some focusing on structural factors (e.g., economics) and others focusing on psychological factors (e.g., fear). We integrate these perspectives by investigating whether Trump votes were concentrated in regions experiencing threatening economic, dem...
Article
Full-text available
All too often, people who develop exceptionally astute insights into others remain mysterious to these others. Evidence for such asymmetric understanding comes from several independent domains. Striking asymmetries occur among those who differ in status and power, such that individuals with low status and power understand more than they are underst...
Preprint
As ordinary citizens increasingly moderate online forums, blogs, and their own social media feeds, a new type of censoring has emerged wherein people selectively remove opposing political viewpoints from online contexts. In three studies of behavior on putative online forums, supporters of a political cause (e.g., abortion or gun rights) preferenti...
Article
Six studies explored the mechanisms that diminish allegiance to social groups. Results showed that degrading either collective ties (i.e., sentiments toward the group as a whole) or relational ties (i.e., sentiments toward individual group members) lowered identity fusion with the group (Studies 1–3 & 6). Lowered fusion, in turn, explained the tend...
Article
Full-text available
Moral foundations theory suggests that relative to liberals, conservatives care more about values that are believed to bind group members together: loyalty/betrayal, authority/subversion, and purity/degradation. In contrast, we propose that individuals who are deeply aligned (“fused”) with their group should display elevated commitment to group‐ori...
Article
Full-text available
In this introduction to the special issue on identity fusion, the co-editors begin with a brief history of the theory. They then discuss the unique properties of the theory and its relationship to related constructs. Next they explain how each of the articles in the issue advances the theory. Finally, they discuss future research directions.
Article
Full-text available
Over the past 2 decades, many social scientists have expanded their data-collection capabilities by using various online research tools. In the 2011 article “Amazon’s Mechanical Turk: A new source of inexpensive, yet high-quality, data?” in Perspectives on Psychological Science, Buhrmester, Kwang, and Gosling introduced researchers to what was then...
Article
We applaud the goal of reconciling the self and group literatures and agree that a differentiated self may sometimes improve group outcomes. Nevertheless, greater precision regarding the underlying mechanisms is needed. Specifically, differentiated selves improve outcomes by overriding selfishness when they allow for personal regulation (being pers...
Article
Identity fusion refers to a visceral sense of oneness with an ingroup. For fused individuals, group membership is not a means to an end (e.g., a positive social identity). Rather, membership is an all-absorbing goal in itself; little other than the group matters. Group membership is also seen as enduring, sustained by chronically activated psycholo...

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