Samuel Safran

Samuel Safran
University of Minnesota Twin Cities | UMN · Department of Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology

About

10
Publications
3,537
Reads
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57
Citations
Citations since 2016
8 Research Items
56 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202205101520
201620172018201920202021202205101520
201620172018201920202021202205101520
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - present
University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Position
  • PhD Student
July 2019 - present
San Francisco Estuary Institute
Position
  • Researcher
April 2016 - June 2019
San Francisco Estuary Institute
Position
  • Researcher
Education
September 2008 - June 2012
Middlebury College
Field of study
  • Conservation Biology

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Preserving and restoring wildlife in urban areas benefits both urban ecosystems and the well‐being of urban residents. While urban wildlife conservation is a rapidly developing field, the majority of conservation research has been performed in wildland areas. Understanding the applicability of wildland science to urban populations and the relative...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are changing the Earth's surface at an accelerating pace, with significant consequences for ecosystems and their biodiversity. Landscape transformation has far-reaching implications including reduced net primary production (NPP) available to support ecosystems, reduced energy supplies to consumers, and disruption of ecosystem services such a...
Technical Report
Full-text available
As the climate continues to change, San Francisco Bay shoreline communities will need to adapt in order to build social and ecological resilience to rising sea levels. Given the complex and varied nature of the Bay shore, a science-based framework is essential to identify effective adaptation strategies that are appropriate for their particular set...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report offers guidance for creating and maintaining landscapes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta that support desired ecological functions, while retaining the overall agricultural character and water-supply service of the region. Based on extensive research into how the Delta functioned historically, how it has changed, and how it is likely...
Article
Full-text available
To evaluate the role of restoration in the recovery of the Delta ecosystem, we need to have clear targets and performance measures that directly assess ecosystem function. Primary production is a crucial ecosystem process, which directly limits the quality and quantity of food available for secondary consumers such as invertebrates and fish. The De...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The physical and ecological environment of the upper San Francisco Estuary has been profoundly altered since the early 1800s. Recent efforts have utilized maps of the upper estuary’s historical habitat types to infer associated changes in desired ecosystem processes and functions. The work presented in this memo builds on these previous efforts, bu...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The goals of the Mission Bay Historical Ecology Reconnaissance Study were to collect and compile high-priority historical data about the Mission Bay landscape, identify sources that could help to develop a deeper understanding of early ecological conditions, and to identify future possible research directions based on the available data. This techn...

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Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
The Tijuana River Valley Historical Ecology Investigation—completed in January 2017—synthesized hundreds of historical maps, photographs, and texts to reconstruct the ecological, hydrological, and geomorphic conditions of the Tijuana River valley prior to major European-American landscape modification. How did the valley look and function before there was the state of California, the city of Tijuana, or an international border? What habitat types and wildlife were found there? How have these habitat types and the physical processes that shaped them changed over time? And finally, what can the valley’s ecological past tell us about its present and future? In answering these fundamental questions, the study has provided scientists, managers, and residents in the valley with information designed to support and inspire ongoing management and restoration activities. The project's geographic scope encompassed the estuarine and alluvial portions of the Tijuana River watershed from the river mouth in southern San Diego County to the Rodriguez Dam in Tijuana, Mexico.