Samuel G. Roy

Samuel G. Roy
University of Maine | UM · Senator George J. Mitchell Center

PhD

About

39
Publications
7,093
Reads
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298
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2021 - present
State of Maine
Position
  • Natural Hazards Planner
September 2018 - January 2021
University of Maine
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2015 - August 2018
University of Maine
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (39)
Article
Full-text available
We collected ground‐penetrating radar (GPR) and frequency‐domain electromagnetic induction (FDEM) profiles in 2011 and 2012 to identify the extent of permafrost relative to surface biomass and solar insolation around Twelvemile Lake near Fort Yukon, Alaska. We compared a Landsat‐derived biomass estimate and modeled solar insolation from a digital e...
Article
Full-text available
We explore the social, ecological, economic, and technical dimensions of sustainable river infrastructure development and the potential benefits of coordinating decisions such as dam removal and stream crossing improvement. Dam removal is common practice for restoring river habitat connectivity and ecosystem health. However, stream crossings such a...
Article
Full-text available
The need to train sustainability scientists and engineers to address the complex problems of our world has never been more apparent. We organized an interdisciplinary team of instructors from universities in the states of Maine, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island who designed, taught, and assessed a multi-university course to develop the core competen...
Article
Full-text available
Aging infrastructure and growing interests in river restoration have led to a substantial rise in dam removals in the United States. However, the decision to remove a dam involves many complex trade-offs. The benefits of dam removal for hazard reduction and ecological restoration are potentially offset by the loss of hydroelectricity production, wa...
Article
Full-text available
Aging infrastructure and growing interests in river restoration have led to a substantial rise in dam removals in the United States. However, the decision to remove a dam involves many complex trade-offs. The benefits of dam removal for hazard reduction and ecological restoration are potentially offset by the loss of hydroelectricity production, wa...
Article
Full-text available
Formation of placer accumulations in fluvial environments requires 103–106 or even greater times concentration of heavy minerals. For this to occur, regular sediment supply from erosion of adjacent topography is required, the river should remain within a single course for an extended period of time and the material must be reworked such that a high...
Research
Combining morphotectonic analysis, topographic anisotropy plots, and earthquake hypocenter relocation to detect and characterize deformation in the landscape of the Western Quebec Seismic Zone, Canada, to clarify the cause of earthquakes.
Article
Full-text available
Erosion rates in the hanging wall of the Alpine Fault are high, keeping pace with rock uplift over time frames of 10⁴–10⁶ years. On shorter time frames, prediction of temporal and spatial distribution of erosion is challenging and must account for local conditions and parameters including rock strength, topographic stresses and failure conditions....
Article
Full-text available
Future precipitation changes in a warming climate depend regionally upon the response of natural climate modes to anthropogenic forcing. North Pacific hydroclimate is dominated by the Aleutian Low, a semi-permanent wintertime feature characterized by frequent low-pressure conditions that is influenced by tropical Pacific Ocean temperatures through...
Presentation
The need to train early-career interdisciplinary, solutions-driven sustainability researchers has never been more apparent than today. To meet this challenge, educators at the Universities of Maine, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island have collaborated with their students to design and assess an interdisciplinary, multi-university course meant to devel...
Poster
Full-text available
The need to train early-career interdisciplinary, solutions-driven researchers has never been more apparent than today. For this reason, educators at the Universities of Maine, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island have collaborated on the design and assessment of an interdisciplinary, multi-university course to develop critical skills, content knowledge...
Poster
In New England, where an industrial past is reflected along many rivers, dam removal has become a cornerstone of environmental restoration practice. One outcome of dam removal that has received significant attention is improved fish passage to historic habitat, providing a crucial gain in ecosystem resilience and health in New England rivers. Howev...
Presentation
Deciding what to do with dams is an increasingly pressing challenge of the Anthropocene. In the New England Sustainability Consortium, we focus on this challenge in the northeastern US where there are more than 14,000 dams, many of which are aging or obsolete and where 50 are eligible for federal relicensing in the next decade. Making decisions abo...
Poster
On a National Science Foundation-funded research project in New England, dozens of sustainability scientists are practicing innovative team science through shared leadership, distributed decision making, and multi-dimensional knowledge integration. This distributed process is made increasingly visible and vital through an ethnography that spans mul...
Article
Full-text available
The grabens within Canyonlands, Utah, is an active salt system primarily driven by differential unloading due to incision of the Colorado River. However, many other conditions exist in the region that potentially influence regional deformation, including the gentle dip of the evaporite deposits, unconfined salt within the river canyon, weaknesses i...
Article
Full-text available
We explore two ways in which the mechanical properties of rock potentially influence fluvial incision and sediment transport within a watershed: rock erodibility is inversely proportional to rock cohesion, and fracture spacing influences the initial grain sizes produced upon erosion. Fault-weakened zones show these effects well because of the sharp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Formation of placer accumulations in fluvial environments requires 10 3 – 10 6 or even greater times concentration of heavy minerals. For this to occur, regular sediment supply from erosion of adjacent topography is required, the river should remain within a single course for an extended period of time and the material must be reworked such that a...
Article
Full-text available
We provide model evidence for a previously unexplored positive feedback between tectonic strain and fluvial erosion by considering rock erodibility as a function of shear damage. Plastic shear strain permanently damages the upper crust within planar shear zones, providing a greater ease for detachment and transport by fluvial processes. The subsequ...
Article
Full-text available
We present the every-direction variogram analysis (EVA) method for quantifying orientation and scale dependence of topographic anisotropy to aid in differentiation of the fluvial and tectonic contributions to surface evolution. Using multi-directional variogram statistics to track the spatial persistence of elevation values across a landscape, we c...
Article
Full-text available
The surface of the Earth retains an imperfect memory of the diverse geodynamic, climatic, and surface transport processes that cooperatively drive the evolution of Earth. In this thesis I explore the potential of using topographic analysis and landscape evolution models to unlock past and/or present evidence for geodynamic activity. I explore the p...
Article
Full-text available
Gradients in the bedrock strength field are increasingly recognized as integral to the rates and patterns of landscape evolution. To explore this influence, we incorporate data from fault strength profiles into a landscape evolution model, under the assumption that erodibility of rock is proportional to the inverse square root of cohesion for bedro...
Article
Full-text available
Crevasse initiation is linked to strain rates that range over three orders of magnitude (0.001 and 0.163 a–1) as a result of the temperature-dependent nonlinear rheological properties of ice and from water and debris inclusions. Here we discuss a small cold glacier that contains buried crevasses at and near an ice divide. Surface-conformable strati...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the development of a subvolcanic magmatic breccia located along the contact of a granitic intrusion using fractal analysis and thermal-elastic modeling. The breccia grades from clast-supported, angular clasts adjacent to unfractured host rock to isolated, rounded clasts supported by the granitic matrix adjacent to the intrusion....
Article
We examine the development of a subvolcanic magmatic breccia located along the contact of a granitic intrusion using fractal analysis and thermal-mechanical modeling. Over a thickness of approximately 1 km, the breccia grades from clast-supported, angular clasts adjacent to unfractured host rock to isolated, rounded clasts supported by the granitic...
Article
Full-text available
The Shatter Zone of Mount Desert Island, Maine, is a 450-1000m thick magmatic breccia that defines the perimeter of the Cadillac Mountain Intrusive Complex. The 400 Ma complex consists of gabbro-diorite sheets overlain by three different granites, the largest of which is an A-type granite emplaced at high temperature (~900oC) and at shallow crustal...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Developing fast computational methods for linking landscape form and pattern with their underlying geologic processes.