Samuel Fillenbaum

Samuel Fillenbaum
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | UNC · Department of Psychology

About

57
Publications
2,259
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2,653
Citations
Citations since 2016
0 Research Items
728 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120

Publications

Publications (57)
Article
Warnings may be phrased as conditionals, as conjunctive sentences, or as disjunctive sentences with the first clause negated; and subjects judge warnings variously phrased as above to the equivalent in meaning. Performance on an incidental recognition test after a cover rating task indicates that there is much confusion among the different phrasing...
Article
Subjects were required to assess the sensibleness of sentences where each set of sentences included a source sentence plus some of its paraphrases. Characteristically, the paraphrases of malformed expressions (anomalous sentences, sentences with order inversions, word salads) were judged to be more sensible than their source expressions. This was t...
Article
How is the understanding and use of vague probability expressions affected by the availability of other expressions and the particular communication task involved? As represented by membership functions (Wallsten, Budescu, Rapoport, Zwick, & Forsyth, 1986) the meanings of core terms (e.g., likely, probable) were not affected by the presence or abse...
Article
Two studies were run to determine whether the interpretations of statements or forecasts using vague probability and frequency expressions such as likely, improbable, frequently, or rarely, were sensitive to the base rates of the events involved. In the first experiment, professional weather forecasters judged event probabilities in situations draw...
Chapter
This chapter discusses various uses of connectives and examines whether such uses are content- and context-sensitive. It is clear that a monologic account of propositional thinking related to truth-functional logic, which has been the favored approach of psychologists, is insufficient if one considers the uses of the connectives in everyday speech....
Article
Searle's analysis of categorial promises is extended to the case of conditional promises and threats (inducements), and a condition on the pragmatic plausibility of inducements is spelled out in terms of the relation between the value/cost of the act being requested or forbidden and the value/cost of the incentive being offered. Some data comprised...
Article
This study examines the purposive-causal use of IF in inducements (conditional threats and promises). It is shown that subjects are sensitive to the relations obtaining among conditional threats and promises phrased in IF, AND, and OR, and to the inferences that may be drawn from conditional threats and promises. It is demonstrated that the relatio...
Article
It is shown 1. that subjects are sensitive to appropriateness conditions governing the use of IF sentences, 2. that different sorts of IF sentences elicit quite different distributions of paraphrases, and 3. that subjects often accept the obverse of a conditional as following from it and IF NOT propositions as following from their mates phrased in...
Article
Attempted to show that individuals are sensitive to differences in the use of the operator or. Results show that on a variety of tasks, Ss were sensitive to differences between or sentences malformed because there was no topical relation between the disjuncts and well-formed or sentences which satisfied the constraint of common topic. In the case o...
Article
51 college students participated in a paraphrase task involving pragmatically extraordinary sentences. More than half the time, Ss normalized 2 sorts of disordered conjunctive sentences as well as disjunctive sentences involving "perverse" threats. Later, when comparing their paraphrases with the source sentences, Ss were often unable to detect dif...
Article
Fillmore (1969) has offered a semantic “role” analysis for some verbs of judging. In the present case study, we subject Fillmore's own similarity judgments for a set of verbs of judging to structural analysis, employing nonmetric multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering techniques. We compare the results with those yielded by more ordin...
Article
Conducted 2 experiments with undergraduates which demonstrated that, in a recognition memory task, Ss recognized the negated antecedent and consequent propositions of previously encountered counterfactual conditionals significantly more often than control items, the latter effect being distinctly stronger (Exp I, n = 110). A similar result was obta...
Article
Anyone who knows a language can tell whether an answer is compatible (C) or incompatible (I) with a question. Subjects were presented with a variety of C and I question and answer pairs and allowed as much time as they required to commit each to memory. It was found that subjects took longer for the initial processing of I items than of C items, wi...
Article
This study sought to determine if the syntactic location of a speech pause might affect its apparent duration. Ss listened to a continuous discourse, being required to attend to its content as well as to make judgments, now and then, as to the duration of particular pauses. For pauses all actually of the same length, it was found that those falling...
Article
Determined whether 143 undergraduates were sensitive to the difference between sentences involving an ordered "and" (*) and those involving an unordered "and" (+), a distinction contingent upon knowledge of some semantic properties of the conjoined verbs. Performance on 2 comprehension tasks revealed that Ss did distinguish between + and * sentence...
Article
Questions inferences about underlying syntactic structures which often have been drawn on the basis of indirect assessment, as by an analysis of confusions in a memorial task, because (a) the sort of syntactic analysis required in a memory task may differ in important respects from that required for full understanding, and (b) such data provide inf...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D. in Psychology)--University of California, Berkeley, Sept. 1956. Includes bibliography. Microfilm. s
Article
79 undergraduates indicated whether or not each item in a 240-word list, presented orally, had occurred previously. There were significantly more false recognition errors for (1) antonyms and (2) synonyms of preceding words than for control items matched with 1 and 2 for strength of associative relation to preceding words. There was no difference b...
Article
The phrasing of a question may reveal presumptions as to its answer. In the case of negative Yes-No questions a grammatical analysis suggests that neg + some questions are biased to a " Yes " reply, while neg + any questions are biased to a " No" reply. There are data indicating that, indeed, listeners predominantly believe that the questioner expe...
Article
Using sentences of the form: A is X, B is not X, C is X and D is not X (where X and X are antonyms) a study of gist memory was carried out concerned with evaluating two alternative proposals as to the way in which simple sentences might be remembered, viz. a " kernel " versus a " reading " hypothesis, and seeking to identify two possible variables...
Article
To assess the effects on the predictability of speech of auditory context above and beyond structural environmental context, the “cloze” technique was used with aphasic and normal speech records. It was found both with regard to verbatim and form-class accuracy that subjects who listened to tape recordings while reading printed transcripts of the s...
Article
With the aim of providing a broader normative base for association data, the contingencies between the grammatical class of a stimulus and that of its associative response were examined. The stimuli were very frequently occurring words, sampled from a variety of grammatical classes. Differences among grammatical classes were found in the degree of...
Article
An experiment was conducted replicating and extending an earlier study by Slack in which size estimates of off-size versions of a familiar object had been found to regress to familiar size, under conditions of rich environmental information. Size and distance estimates were obtained for normal, oversized, and undersized chairs (and control stakes a...
Article
The effects of an irregularly varying delay in auditory feedback (VDAF) were compared with those of a constant delay in feedback (DAF) with regard to: (a) impairment in level of performance, (b) adaptation in performance, and (c) possible differences in rate of adaptation. Performance in a reading task was compared using a DAF interval of .20 sec....
Article
Binaurally asynchronous delayed auditory feedback (DAF) was compared with synchronous DAF in 80 normal subjects. Asynchronous DAF (0.10 sec difference) did not yield results different from those obtained under synchronous DAF with a 0.20 sec delay interval, an interval characteristically resulting in maximum disruptions in speech.
Article
Under conditions of continuous elicitation, words functioning as nouns took longer to lose meaning than the same words functioning as adverbs. It was suggested that a word can function more readily as an independent item in a nominal than in an adverbial usage, and that a word is likely to maintain its meaning longer to the extent that it can funct...
Article
If there are losses or changes in meaning due to continued exposure to a word then, immediately afterward, it should take longer to perform some task or make some decision requiring knowledge of that word's meaning. In each of 3 experiments, decision latency was found to be significantly shorter when a repeated word was identical with one of the de...
Article
Under conditions of continuous elicitation, lexical words (nouns) took significantly longer to lose meaning than function words (conjunctions and prepositions), even though each of the critical words appeared embedded in a sentence context. An attempt is made to interpret these findings; and the need is stressed for adequate sampling from the vario...
Article
The relation between individual differences in amount of dissonance reduction and open-closed mindedeness as indexed by Dogmatism score was determined. In line with expectation, a significant correlation was obtained between these variables ( r = .39, p < .01), the more dogmatic Ss showing greater tendency to dissonance reduction. However, a correl...
Article
This study examined the Denny Doodlebug (DD) problem (a task requiring that S reject a number of the standard operating procedures of daily life and that he organize a new set of assumptions into a working system) by changing the order of presentation of clues. The effects of such change on task performance were considered with reference to Rokeach...
Article
Four experiments were carried out in an investigation of the co-satiating effects of verbal repetition, and in an examination of the semantic relation of synonymity by use of a verbal satiation technique. In every experiment, and for every analysis, synonym-satiated items yielded less common associations than self-satiated items or control items sa...
Article
The “cloze” procedure, which requires raters to fill in words deleted from a transcript and provides a measure of the predictability of speech, was used to study the predictability of the various grammatical classes and of specific items drawn from them, and changes in such predictability with systematic variation in rate of textual deletion (from...
Article
It was suggested that feedback information for monitoring speech should be more important the tighter the intra- or inter-segment dependencies in a speech task, and thus the more automatized the task. Hence the impairing effects of delayed auditory feedback (DAF) should be greater the tighter such dependencies. In order to test this suggestion two...
Article
A re‐examination of some data previously obtained by C. R. Elliott indicates that the absolute disruptive effect of delayed auditory feedback (DAF) is greater the greater the contextual constraint in a passage, and the more rapidly the passage is read under normal control conditions. The easier the reading task, the greater is the impairment in per...
Article
"This study involved a replication and extension of some of Rokeach's work on the relation of Dogmatism (D) and Anxiety (A) to performance in a problem solving task . . .. Consistent with previous results, Ss with very high D scores performed more poorly on the . . . problem . . . and a significant positive relation . . . was found between D scores...
Article
Ss completed 80 sentences of the same grammatical construction, and completions were classified as Subject or Nonsubject depending upon whether or not the relative pronoun "that" was made the subject of the subordinate clause. For ½ the Ss a Subject completion was considered incorrect, and the same item was given again and again until a Nonsubject...
Article
The free speech of each of twelve adult aphasic patients was examined with reference particularly to (1) the distribution of words according to grammatical function, (2) sequential dependencies in form-class usage, and (3) stereotypy in vocabulary. The majority of the aphasic records departed considerably from normal usage (as defined by analysis o...
Article
Regarding language as an identifying feature of a national or cultural group, English and French students were asked to evaluate English-speaking and French-speaking speakers. Bilinguists were used who recorded passages in both French and English. Ss rated on the basis of traits related to desirability in regard to friendship, e.g., dependability,...
Article
14 patients in Montreal were studied and compared to a group of European polyglot aphasics described by Leischner. For the Montreal group, the language learned first and used most was the first to be recovered, in contrast to the European group. A distinction between compound and coordinate bilingualism is useful for interpretation.

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