Samantha L Strong

Samantha L Strong
Aston University · Department of Optometry

PhD

About

12
Publications
827
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107
Citations
Introduction
I am a Lecturer of Vision Science currently based at Aston University. My research interests involve discerning the functions of motion-sensitive areas within the human brain; particularly those involved in perception of optic flow.
Additional affiliations
April 2019 - present
Aston University
Position
  • Lecturer
January 2016 - March 2019
University of Bradford
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2014 - December 2014
University of Bradford
Position
  • Teaching Assistant (Temporary Lecturer)
Education
October 2012 - December 2015
University of Bradford
Field of study
  • Optometry and Vision Science
October 2009 - June 2012
The University of York
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Two subdivisions of human V5/MT+; one located posteriorly (MT/TO-1), the other more anteriorly (MST/TO-2), were identified in human participants using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on the basis of their representations of the ipsi- versus contra-lateral visual field. These subdivisions were then targeted for disruption by the applica...
Article
Human neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have raised the possibility that different attributes of optic flow stimuli, namely radial direction and the position of the focus of expansion (FOE), are processed within separate cortical areas. In the human brain, visual areas V5/MT+ and V3A have been proposed as integral to the analysis of these...
Article
Full-text available
Previous experiments have demonstrated that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of human V5/MT+, in either the left or right cerebral hemisphere, can induce deficits in visual motion perception in their respective contra- and ipsi-lateral visual hemi-fields. However, motion deficits in the ipsi-lateral hemi-field are greater when TMS is applied...
Article
Neuropsychological studies (Beardsley and Vaina, 2005) have shown that patients with damage to V5/MT+ are unable to identify the direction of radially moving stimuli, but maintain their ability to identify the focus of the expansion (FOE). This suggests that FOE position is signalled by neural activity outside V5/MT+ and another motion area, V3A, h...
Article
Full-text available
We present a database of high-definition (HD) videos for the study of traits inferred from whole-body actions. Twenty-nine actors (19 female) were filmed performing different actions—walking, picking up a box, putting down a box, jumping, sitting down, and standing and acting—while conveying different traits, including four emotions (anger, fear, h...

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