Samantha Saville

Samantha Saville
Centre for Alternative Technology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

10
Publications
859
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22
Citations
Introduction
Environmental and cultural human geographer. Teaching Associate at the Scott Polar Research Institute and Department of Geography, University of Cambridge. Research interests: Political ecology, environmental values*Climate change*Polar geographies*Globalization and rural change*Value theory and assemblage theory. Research projects: ‘Access Abisko – Values’; 'Svalbard Futures: Value and Adaptation in the Anthropocene'; ‘Saving Svalbard?; ‘Global-Rural’.

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Svalbard is an “edge-of-the-world” hot spot for environmental change, political discourse, tourism and scientific research in the Anthropocene. Drawing on ethnographic and qualitative research, I use this context to critically explore the identity-categories of “researcher” and “tourist”. Through the lens of political ecology, I draw out the uneven...
Technical Report
Full-text available
It is recognised that Svalbard, and Longyearbyen in particular, is undergoing rapid socio-economic and environmental change, accompanied by increased discussion of future strategies and management. This report summarises the key messages from Dr Saville’s research that could be useful in informing future decision-making processes. Much of this may...
Article
If globalization is conceived as an outcome of negotiations between places and relational processes, how do researchers capture such amorphous complexity? Drawing upon the framework of assemblage theory this paper unpicks the plethora of processes and practices encompassed within the problematic term ‘globalization’. Focusing on the ‘banal’ object...
Chapter
Svalbard has become a site of prolific scientific interest and draws increasing numbers of scientists and students to its high Arctic research stations every year. They join the proliferation of tourists visiting the archipelago. Meanwhile, Norway aims for Svalbard to be one of the best managed wilderness areas in the world and works to achieve thi...
Book
This book considers the concept of ‘value’ at the root of our actions and decision-making. Value is an ever-present, yet little interrogated aspect of everyday life. This book explores value as it is theorised, practiced and critiqued from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. It examines how value is operationalized, endorsed and contested in c...
Article
As indications of ‘overtourism’ appear in the Arctic, tourism presents both management challenges and ethical dilemmas, applicable to broader discussions about sustainability within Polar tourism. I argue that mapping value relations can contribute to ongoing discussions for positive ways forwards and that the concept of degrowth holds promise in r...
Article
Full-text available
This paper outlines the potential for a more “humble geography.” Most of us have been awed in some way by the world, humbled, but how often is that reflected in our work as geographers? As a thinking tool, “humble geographies” can combine insights and ethics from posthuman and feminist philosophies, participatory action research, and situated knowl...
Book
Full-text available
In September 2016 Aberystwyth University conducted an indepth survey of 162 residents of Newtown and Llanllwchaiarn, supplemented by a further 72 shorter street surveys. This report provides a summary of the findings. The survey is part of a wider research project, ?Global-Rural?, which is investigating the ways processes of globalisation are exper...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The aim of the research is to examine how globalisation has had an impact on rural areas in different parts of the world, and to study the ways in which rural communities have responded to the challenges and opportunities presented by globalisation. There are a number of research work packages being taken forward by the research team on the GLOBAL-RURAL project. Many have an international focus ranging from understanding the reconfiguration of the rural as the ‘global countryside’, a mapping of globalisation processes and networks impacting rural localities and local responses in different parts of the world, how ideas of rural development are being adapted and influenced by these processes, and exploring how rural places are embroiled in responses to ‘global challenges’ such as climate change and food security. Some of this research is grounded in a PhD research project in Grand Cape Mount County in western Liberia. Grand Cape Mount County is one of the focus of the project looking at ‘land grabbing’, how the routine global engagement of the county and its residents through trade, migration, culture over the past few years has affected and continues to affect the development of the county and its community.