Samantha A Price

Samantha A Price
Clemson University | CU · Department of Biological Sciences

PhD

About

73
Publications
24,954
Reads
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5,742
Citations
Citations since 2016
39 Research Items
3067 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
Additional affiliations
August 2017 - present
Clemson University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
November 2008 - August 2017
University of California, Davis
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (73)
Article
The deep sea contains a surprising diversity of life, including iconic fish groups such as anglerfishes and lanternfishes. Still, >65% of marine teleost fish species are restricted to the photic zone <200 m, which comprises less than 10% of the ocean's total volume. From a macroevolutionary perspective, this paradox may be explained by three hypoth...
Article
Biotic interactions govern the structure and function of coral reef ecosystems. As environmental conditions change, reef-associated fish populations can persist by tracking their preferred niche or adapting to new conditions. Biotic interactions will affect how these responses proceed and whether they are successful. Yet, our understanding of these...
Article
Full-text available
Diversity of feeding mechanisms is a hallmark of reef fishes, but the history of this variation is not fully understood. Here, we explore the emergence and proliferation of a biting mode of feeding, which enables fishes to feed on attached benthic prey. We find that feeding modes other than suction, including biting, ram biting, and an intermediate...
Article
Full-text available
Body size influences nearly every aspect of an organism’s biology and ecology. When studying body size, researchers often focus on a single dimension, such as length, despite the fact that size can evolve by altering multiple body dimensions. The distinct ways organisms change their size can have profound consequences on evolutionary and ecological...
Article
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Spiny-rayed fishes (Acanthomorpha) dominate modern marine habitats and account for more than a quarter of all living vertebrate species. Previous time-calibrated phylogenies and patterns from the fossil record explain this dominance by correlating the origin of major acanthomorph lineages with the Cretaceous–Palaeogene mass extinction. Here we infe...
Article
Teleost fishes account for 96% of all fish species and exhibit a spectacular variety of body forms. Teleost lineages range from deep‐bodied to elongate (e.g. eels, needlefish), laterally compressed (e.g. ribbonfish) to globular (e.g. pufferfish) and include uniquely shaped lineages such as seahorses, flatfishes and ocean sunfishes. Adaptive body sh...
Article
Because teeth are the most easily preserved part of the vertebrate skeleton and are particularly morphologically variable in mammals, studies of fossil mammals rely heavily on dental morphology. Dental morphology is used both for systematics and phylogeny as well as for inferences about paleoecology, diet in particular. We analyze the influence of...
Article
Evolutionary comparisons between major environmental divides, such as between marine and freshwater systems, can reveal the fundamental processes governing diversification dynamics. Although processes may differ due to the different scales of their biogeographic barriers, freshwater and marine environments nevertheless offer similar opportunities f...
Article
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Deep-sea fishes have long captured our imagination with striking adaptations to life in the mysterious abyss, raising the possibility that this cold, dark ocean region may be a key hub for physiological and functional diversification. We explore this idea through an analysis of body shape evolution across ocean depth zones in over 3000 species of m...
Preprint
Full-text available
Spiny-rayed fishes (Acanthomorpha) dominate modern marine habitats and comprise more than a quarter of all living vertebrate species1-3. It is believed that this dominance resulted from explosive lineage and phenotypic diversification coincident with the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass-extinction event4. It remains unclear, however, if living acan...
Article
Sabertooth craniodental adaptations have evolved numerous times amongst carnivorous mammals. Some of the most extreme sabertooth adaptations are found within the carnivoran subfamily Barbourofelinae. However, the evolutionary origins of this group have been uncertain for more than 170 years, with variable placement as an independent case of saberto...
Article
Full-text available
Teleost fishes vary in their reliance on median and paired fins (MPF) or undulation of the body (BCF) to generate thrust during straight-line, steady swimming. Previous work indicates that swimming mode is associated with different body shapes, though this has never been empirically demonstrated across the diversity of fishes. As the body does not...
Article
Full-text available
Synopsis Whether distantly related organisms evolve similar strategies to meet the demands of a shared ecological niche depends on their evolutionary history and the nature of form–function relationships. In fishes, the visual identification and consumption of microscopic zooplankters, selective zooplanktivory, is a distinct type of foraging often...
Article
Full-text available
Marine habitats vary widely in structure, from incredibly complex coral reefs to simpler deep water and open ocean habitats. Hydromechanical models of swimming kinematics and microevolutionary studies suggest that these habitats select for different body shape characteristics. Fishes living in simple habitats are predicted to experience selection f...
Article
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Key innovations may allow lineages access to new resources and facilitate the invasion of new adaptive zones, potentially influencing diversification patterns. Many studies have focused on the impact of key innovations on speciation rates, but far less is known about how they influence phenotypic rates and patterns of ecomorphological diversificati...
Article
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Colonization of novel habitats can result in marked phenotypic responses to the new environment that include changes in body shape and opportunities for further morphological diversification. Fishes have repeatedly transitioned along the benthic–pelagic axis, with varying degrees of association with the substrate. Previous work focusing on individu...
Article
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Synopsis The measurement and analysis of phenotypes is often a rate-limiting step for many integrative organismal studies but engaging undergraduate researchers can help overcome this challenge. We present a practical guide to implementing a quantitative specimen-based Course-based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE), which trains students to...
Article
In recent years, the fields of evolutionary biomechanics and morphology have developed into a deeply quantitative and integrative science, resulting in a much richer understanding of how structural relationships shape macroevolutionary patterns. This issue highlights new research at the conceptual and experimental cutting edge, with a special focus...
Article
We present a dataset that quantifies body shape in three dimensions across the teleost phylogeny. Built by a team of researchers measuring easy-to-identify, functionally relevant traits on specimens at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History it contains data on 16,609 specimens from 6144 species across 394 families. Using phylogenetic co...
Article
Understanding the causes of body shape variability across the tree of life is one of the central issues surrounding the origins of biodiversity. One potential mechanism driving observed patterns of shape disparity is a strongly conserved relationship between size and shape. Conserved allometry has been shown to account for as much as 80% of shape v...
Article
Antipredator defensive traits are thought to trade‐off evolutionarily with traits that facilitate predator avoidance. However, complexity and scale have precluded tests of this prediction in many groups, including fishes. Using a macroevolutionary approach, we test this prediction in butterflyfishes, an iconic group of coral reef inhabitants with d...
Article
The diversity of fishes on coral reefs is influenced by the evolution of feeding innovations. For instance, the evolution of an intramandibular jaw joint has aided shifts to corallivory in Chaetodon butterflyfishes following their Miocene colonization of coral reefs. Today, over half of all Chaetodon species consume coral, easily the largest concen...
Article
Innovations in organismal functional morphology are thought to be a major force in shaping evolutionary patterns, with the potential to drive adaptive radiation and influence the evolutionary prospects for lineages. But the evolutionary consequences of innovation are diverse and usually do not result in adaptive radiation. What factors shape the ma...
Article
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Studies into the complex interaction between an organism and changes to its biotic and abiotic environment are fundamental to understanding what regulates biodiversity. These investigations occur at many phylogenetic, temporal and spatial scales and within a variety of biological and geological disciplines but often in relative isolation. This issu...
Article
The spread of grasslands and cooling climate in the Miocene contributed to an increasingly abrasive diet for ungulates. This increase in abrasiveness is proposed to select for both hypsodonty and increasing complexity of occlusal enamel bands. If these traits evolved in response to strong selection to resist tooth wear while feeding in grassland ha...
Article
Morphological convergence plays a central role in the study of evolution. Often induced by shared ecological specialization, homoplasy hints at underlying selective pressures and adaptive constraints that deterministically shape the diversification of life. Though midwater zooplanktivory has arisen in adult surgeonfishes (family Acanthuridae) at le...
Conference Paper
Burrowing behavior, or fossoriality, has evolved a number of times among mammals, generating a diversity of morphological and physiological adaptations among the varied lineages that acquire this life habit. Because many of the adaptations that allow efficient burrowing also are detrimental to predator avoidance and escape aboveground, the evolutio...
Article
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It is well known that predators can induce morphological changes in some fish: individuals exposed to predation cues increase body depth and the length of spines. We hypothesize that these structures may evolve synergistically, as together, these traits will further enlarge the body dimensions of the fish that gape-limited predators must overcome....
Article
Studies of the phylogenetic history of fishes on reefs and the impact of reefs on fish diversification have, to date, been limited to relatively small clades. We take advantage of a recent multi-locus, time-calibrated phy-logeny of acanthomorph fishes and a broad-scale morphological dataset of body shape in reef acanthomorphs to explore the history...
Article
Body mass and diet are two fundamental ecological parameters that influence many other aspects of an animal's biology. Thus, the potential physiological and ecological processes linking size and diet have been the subject of extensive research, although the broad macroevolutionary relationship between the two traits remains largely unexplored phylo...
Article
Full-text available
Living reef fishes are one of the most diverse vertebrate assemblages on Earth. Despite its prominence and ecological importance, the origins and assembly of the reef fish fauna is poorly described. A patchy fossil record suggests that the major colonization of reef habitats must have occurred in the Late Cretaceous and early Palaeogene, with the e...
Article
Full-text available
Spiny-rayed fishes, or acanthomorphs, comprise nearly one-third of all living vertebrates. Despite their dominant role in aquatic ecosystems, the evolutionary history and tempo of acanthomorph diversification is poorly understood. We investigate the pattern of lineage diversification in acanthomorphs by using a well-resolved time-calibrated phyloge...
Article
The relationship between habitat complexity and species richness is well established but comparatively little is known about the evolution of morphological diversity in complex habitats. Reefs are structurally complex, highly productive shallow-water marine ecosystems found in tropical (coral reefs) and temperate zones (rocky reefs) that harbor exc...
Article
The perciform group Labroidei includes approximately 2600 species and comprises some of the most diverse and successful lineages of teleost fishes. Composed of four major clades, Cichlidae, Labridae (wrasses, parrotfishes, and weed whitings), Pomacentridae (damselfishes), and Embiotocidae (surfperches); labroids have been an icon for studies of bio...
Article
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Mammals are characterized by the complex adaptations of their dentition, which are an indication that diet has played a critical role in their evolutionary history. Although much attention has focused on diet and the adaptations of specific taxa, the role of diet in large-scale diversification patterns remains unresolved. Contradictory hypotheses h...
Article
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Morphological diversification does not proceed evenly across the organism. Some body parts tend to evolve at higher rates than others, and these rate biases are often attributed to sexual and natural selection or to genetic constraints. We hypothesized that variation in the rates of morphological evolution among body parts could also be related to...
Article
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Ecology Letters (2011) 14: 462–469 Although coral reefs are renowned biodiversity hotspots it is not known whether they also promote the evolution of exceptional ecomorphological diversity. We investigated this question by analysing a large functional morphological dataset of trophic characters within Labridae, a highly diverse group of fishes. Usi...
Article
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Modern whales are frequently described as an adaptive radiation spurred by either the evolution of various key innovations (such as baleen or echolocation) or ecological opportunity following the demise of archaic whales. Recent analyses of diversification rate shifts on molecular phylogenies raise doubts about this interpretation since they find n...
Article
The association between diversification and evolutionary innovations has been well documented and tested in studies of taxonomic richness but the impact that such innovations have on the diversity of form and function is less well understood. Using phylogenetically rigorous techniques, we investigated the association between morphological diversity...
Article
Synthetic science promises an unparalleled ability to find new meaning in old data, extant results, or previously unconnected methods and concepts, but pursuing synthesis can be a difficult and risky endeavor. Our experience as biologists, informaticians, and educators at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center has affirmed that synthesis can yi...
Article
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Analyses of life-history, ecological, and geographic trait differences among species, their causes, correlates, and likely consequences are increasingly important for understanding and conserving biodiversity in the face of rapid global change. Assembling multispecies trait data from diverse literature sources into a single comprehensive data set r...
Article
We present the first phylogenies to include all extant species of Perissodactyla (odd-toed hoofed mammals) and the recently extinct quagga (Equus quagga). Two independent data sets were examined; one based on multiple genes and analyzed using both supertree and supermatrix approaches, and a second being a supertree constructed from trees collected...
Article
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Did the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event, by eliminating non-avian dinosaurs and most of the existing fauna, trigger the evolutionary radiation of present-day mammals? Here we construct, date and analyse a species-level phylogeny of nearly all extant Mammalia to bring a new perspective to this question. Our analyses of how extant lineages accum...
Article
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The R statistical analysis package has emerged as a popular platform for implementation of powerful comparative methods to understand the evolution of organismal traits and diversification. A hackathon was organized to bring together active R developers as well as end-users working on the integration of comparative phylogenetic methods within R to...
Article
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Half of all artiodactyls (even-toed hoofed mammals) are threatened with extinction, around double the mammalian average. Here, using a complete species-level phylogeny, we construct a multivariate model to assess for the first time which intrinsic (biological) and extrinsic (anthropogenic and environmental) factors influence variation in extinction...
Article
Host social, ecological and life history traits are predicted to influence both parasite establishment within host species and the distribution of parasites among host species. Yet only a few studies have investigated the role multiple host traits play in determining patterns of infection across diverse parasite groups. To explore the association b...
Article
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Despite the biological and economic importance of the Cetartiodactyla, the phylogeny of this clade remains controversial. Using the supertree approach of matrix representation with parsimony, we present the first phylogeny to include all 290 extant species of the Cetacea (whales and dolphins) and Artiodactyla (even-toed hoofed mammals). At the fami...
Chapter
Full-text available
As in conventional phylogenetic analyses, issues surrounding the source data are paramount in the supertree construction, but have received insufficient attention. In supertree construction, however, the source data represent phylogenetic trees rather than primary character data. This presents several supertree-specific problems. In this paper, we...
Chapter
Full-text available
The field of comparative biology has undergone a renaissance since researchers began examining macroevolutionary questions in an explicit phylogenetic framework. However, research into these new areas is now hampered by incomplete phylogenetic information for the clades of interest. Species-level trees made by supertree construction techniques offe...
Article
Full-text available
Didtheend-Cretaceousmassextinctionevent,byeliminatingnon-aviandinosaursandmostoftheexistingfauna,triggerthe evolutionary radiation ofpresent-day mammals?Here weconstruct,dateand analyseaspecies-levelphylogeny ofnearlyall extantMammaliatobringanewperspectivetothisquestion.Ouranalysesofhowextantlineagesaccumulatedthroughtime show that net per-lineage...

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