Samantha Cohen

Samantha Cohen
University of Virginia | UVa · Biocomplexity Institute--Social Decision and Analytics Division

Doctor of Philosophy

About

10
Publications
517
Reads
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14
Citations
Citations since 2017
7 Research Items
14 Citations
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Introduction
Sam Cohen is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Virginia, and did her PhD at Indiana University in Psychological and Brain Sciences & Cognitive Science. She has broad interdisciplinary training in social psychology, judgement and decision-making, and animal behavior. Her thesis focuses on using the rich research on mate choice to frame other, lesser-studied social domains, including collaborator and pet choice. She primarily uses computational methods in tandem with studies conducted outside the lab, such as speed-networking events, online dating profiles, and animal shelter visitors. Looking forward, she intends to further studies of choice, human-animal interaction, and human- and non-human computer interaction.
Additional affiliations
May 2017 - present
Indiana University Bloomington
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2013 - May 2017
Indiana University Bloomington
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
August 2013 - August 2019
Indiana University Bloomington
Field of study
  • Psychology and Cognitive Science
August 2008 - December 2011

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
How do singles' strategies for engaging in sexual activity with a new partner vary across the adult lifespan? Using three large and independent demographically representative cross-sectional samples of heterosexual single adults in the U.S., we found that females approaching the typical age of menopause became less likely to establish relationship...
Article
Humans often say they prefer certain attributes and trait levels and yet choose options inconsistent with those preferences, a phenomenon known as the stated–revealed preference gap. In this article, we compare preferences and choices in the decision to adopt a dog, a social-choice problem that is largely one-sided. We used existing and newly gathe...
Article
Animals foraging for resources often need to alternate between searching for and benefiting from patches of those resources. Here we explore whether such patterns of behavior can usefully be applied to the human search for romantic relationships. Optimal foraging theory (OFT) suggests that foragers should alter their time spent in patches based on...
Presentation
Full-text available
In evolutionary biology, we rarely have opportunities to observe evolution in action--especially when we're studying humans. We also rarely can test assumptions, such as whether an intervention will have the predicted effect on a population. Agent-based simulations are a powerful tool for evolutionary biologists which can serve as an inexpensive an...
Presentation
A number of works have examined how the efficacy of strategies change with the environment and under competition. However, few have examined how searching changes the environment itself. Using a agent-based foraging simulation in a patchy environment, we examine the qualitative and quantitative differences made to the distribution of resources by a...
Conference Paper
The choice to enter and leave a romantic relationship can be framed as a decision-making problem based on expected utility of the partnership over time, akin to a forager deciding whether to stay in a particular patch based on the amount of resources it provides. We examined the temporal trajectory of three traits that may correspond to resources i...
Presentation
Full-text available
Learning to effectively communicate with your team is an essential skill in any tech field. For women, adapting to these male-dominated workplaces can feel like learning a new language, and it often seems like your ideas and accomplishments get lost in translation. But is there any scientific evidence that men and women vary in their speech pattern...
Poster
As humans age and their reproductive window closes, how do they alter their search for reproductive partners? We hypothesized that when time plays a critical role in the possibility of reproduction, such as near menopause, reproductive strategies change. Results indicate that individuals may unconsciously alter their search patterns for reproductiv...
Presentation
Social organization of networks is often characterized by homophily, where similar individuals cluster together. Within academic collaboration networks, clustering can take the form of departmental affiliations, which can prevent researchers from collaborating with similar individuals in other departments and inhibit interdisciplinary and innovativ...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Archived project
Individuals searching for many types of resources follow patterns predicted by optimal foraging theory, in terms of how they search for things and the amount of time they spend using that resource once acquired. Do individuals searching for romantic partners follow similar partners of trade-offs?
Archived project
How do academics decide with whom to collaborate? Is it based on professional or personal characteristics? We studied the choices made by real academics over 3 speed-networking events.