Sam Naidu

Sam Naidu
Rhodes University | RU · Department of Literary Studies in English

BJourn, BA (Hons), MA, PhD, PGDHE

About

42
Publications
5,442
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76
Citations
Introduction
Teaching and Research Interests: South African/Postcolonial Crime Fiction; Nineteenth Century Detective Fiction; African Literature; Transnational Literature (Literature of the African, Latin American, and South Asian Diasporas); Postcolonial Feminist Literature; Oral/written interface in colonial South Africa; English transcriptions of Xhosa folktales; the publication and marketing of indigenous South African orature; Folklore and Ethnographic Writings of George McCall Theal; Emily Dickinson; and, Experimental Pedagogies, including the combination of Community Engagement and Literary Studies, as well as the use of yoga in tertiary education. Sam is the founder and co-ordinator of the Andrew W. Mellon's Intersecting Diasporas Research Group.

Publications

Publications (42)
Poster
Full-text available
The Routledge Companion to Crime Fiction is a comprehensive introduction to crime fiction scholarship. Across 45 original chapters, specialists in the field offer innovative approaches to the classics of the genre as well as mappings of emerging themes and trends. Rigorously argued and engagingly written, the volume is indispensable both to student...
Article
In the short stories “Devil at a Dead End” (1978) and “On Monday of Last Week” (2009), the protagonists (migrants from Lesotho to South Africa and from Nigeria to the USA, respectively) are portrayed as vulnerable in terms of race, sexual violation, and exploitation. While capturing the complex vulnerability of the African female migrant, these sto...
Chapter
Naidu argues that transnational crime wreaks havoc on global, national and personal levels in the postcolonial crime novels Devil’s Peak (2007) by South African author Deon Meyer and Night Prayers (2016) by Colombian author Santiago Gamboa. As postcolonial crime novels, they critique sociopolitical instability and corruption harking back to colonia...
Article
This article, which focuses on African noir as a variety of neo-noir literature, begins by outlining the intertextual and intercultural relationships between classic noir and African noir. Thereafter, the postcolonial, postmodernist and transnational elements of African noir are described utilizing Mũkoma wa Ngũgĩ’s novel Black Star Nairobi (2013)...
Article
Crime and detective fiction continues to top bestseller lists across the world, spawning TV series and films. In the hands of African writers, though, the genre offers a particularly textured world view. That Ever-blurry Line Between Us and the Criminals: Re-Visioning Justice in African Noir is a colloquium paper by Sam Naidu. It focuses on Africa...
Poster
Full-text available
Masters and PhD candidates wishing to embark on research projects which explore fictional representations of the experiences and exigencies of diaspora, and who favour a comparative methodology informed by an intersectional approach to the study of literature are invited to apply for: MA scholarship (two years): ZAR 100 000.00 per annum PhD scholar...
Article
This article explores representations of complex diasporic subjectivities that resist, or attempt to resist, obsolete nationalist notions of citizenship and identity by crossing the US– Mexico border (and, in so doing, crossing other intangible borders) in search of a better life. Two examples of border literature, Luis Alberto Urrea's Into the Bea...
Article
Full-text available
Poster
Full-text available
The Intersecting Diasporas Group focuses on transnational subjectivities represented in literature of the African, Latin American and South Asian diasporas. The project examines literature produced in the African, Latin American and South Asian diasporic contexts. Mainly, the project utilises a comparative methodology which explores the respective...
Chapter
This chapter is a survey of teaching crime fiction in postcolonial South Africa. After offering a definition and historicisation of postcolonial crime fiction in general, the survey focuses on my third-year undergraduate course, ‘Sleuthing the State: South African Crime and Detective Fiction’. The survey includes a description of the curriculum con...
Article
In this article we compare and contrast the figure of the migrant, central to Dan Jacobson’s short story ‘A Long Way from London’, and to Jean Rhys’s short story ‘Let Them Call It Jazz’, both of which are set in London in the early to mid-twentieth century. The main argument is that these figures, as migrants in London from South Africa and the Car...
Chapter
Life-writing by women of the South Asian diaspora, to a lesser or greater degree and with varying aesthetic representation, deals with images of the past and the ‘homeland’; the problematic use of memory in life-writing; female relatives and their influence on the author’s subjectivity; a feminist questioning of traditional and changing gender role...
Presentation
Full-text available
Title: A “horrific breakdown of reason”: Holmes and the Postcolonial Crime Fiction Novel, Lost Ground Abstract: Using the notion of ‘negative hermeneutics’, this paper examines how Michiel Heyns’s novel, Lost Ground, draws on the heritage of the Sherlock Holmes stories. It argues that Heyns’s representation of crime in contemporary South Africa nec...
Chapter
Using the notion of “negative hermeneutics,” this chapter examines how Michiel Heyns’s novel Lost Ground draws on the heritage of the Sherlock Holmes stories. It argues that Heyns’s representation of contemporary South Africa necessitates a shift from the emphasis on the epistemological quests of nineteenth-century detective fiction to the “negativ...
Book
Full-text available
Note: author order should be alphabetical; Researchgate insisted on putting me first because I uploaded the book. In April 2016, a Sexual Violence Task Team (SVTT) was set up to explore how a counter culture to rape culture may be implemented at the University. The task team and its terms of reference were set up in a participatory process outline...
Article
Crime fiction is an established and popular literary genre in South Africa that has gained international recognition and acclaim. The genre continues to expand and develop in terms of thematic concerns and experiments in form. One such notable development is the farm crime novel, which extends the tradition of the South African plaasroman. Recent t...
Book
This book of interdisciplinary essays serves to situate the original Sherlock Holmes, and his various adaptations, in a contemporary cultural context. This collection is prompted by three main and related questions: firstly, why is Sherlock Holmes such an enduring and ubiquitous cultural icon; secondly, why is it that Sherlock Holmes, nearly 130 ye...
Article
Full-text available
In this essay we demonstrate how the burgeoning field of South African crime fiction has responded to the birth and development of a democratic, post-apartheid South African state. First, an overview of South African crime fiction in the last 20 years is presented. Then the essay presents an argument for South African crime fiction to be regarded a...
Article
A literary criticism of the book "The Kite Runner" by Khaled Hosseini is presented. It outlines the characters and explores the symbolic significance of these characters. It explores the aspects of contemporary literature among neo-Orientalist representations of the Middle East and the Muslim world. It notes on the contribution of the Euro-American...
Article
Since the publication of the first Sherlock Holmes text in 1887, the character of Sherlock Holmes has captured the imagination of readers and sparked the creativity of writers the world over. There has been over the years a bounty of stories and novels, films, radio dramas, televisions series, magazines, plays, internet fanfiction, computer games,...
Article
Heeding Patrick Murphy's call to critics, in his book, Ecocritical explorations in literary and cultural studies: fences, boundaries and field, to study “nature-oriented mystery novels … in order to understand the degree to which environmental consciousness and nature awareness has permeated popular and commercial fiction” (2009: 143), this article...
Article
Using the late twentieth-century French feminist notions of écriture féminine and the abject as a starting point, this article considers the various pitfalls, effects and ethical ramifications of representations of violence against the female body in South African crime fiction. How do authors reconcile the entertainment value of such representatio...
Article
This article focuses specifically on George McCall Theal’s collection of folktale texts, Kaffir Folklore (1882), as an example of an early South African ethnographic publication, and argues that the folktale transcriptions contained therein, although a part of Theal’s general colonialist project, are hybrid, containing the voices of both coloniser...
Article
Full-text available
This article takes as its starting point that crime fiction is a public and political response to gender-based violence. Using the methods of both discourse analysis and literary analysis of the crime fiction genre, the novels of Margie Orford, internationally acclaimed crime author and patron of Rape Crisis, are examined for their representations...
Article
Crime fiction is an emergent category in South African literary studies. This introduction positions South African crime fiction and its scholarship in a global lineage of crime and detective fiction. The survey addresses the question of its literary status as ‘highbrow’ or ‘lowbrow’. It also identifies and describes two distinct sub-genres of Sout...
Article
This article is a review of a burgeoning literary genre, South African crime fiction, as much as it is a review of specific texts. First, for the purposes of contextualisation and historicisation, an overview of the primary literature is provided. Then criticism and theories of extant crime fiction in mainly the UK and USA, of which South African c...
Book
Pillay, a trailblazer in Human Rights Law, was born in1941 to a humble Indian family in apartheid South Africa. She faced enormous obstacles to her aspirations for further education and a meaningful career. However, in 1967 she was the first black woman in South Africa to set up a law practice which she used to defend many anti-apartheid activists....
Article
The three narrative strands that inform this essay – the life-story of George McCall Theal, the history of colonialism in South Africa which he wrote, and the Xhosa folktale – are, to a large extent, incongruent with each other, and their interweaving produces an ungainly, sometimes ambivalent overarching narrative. The narrative nevertheless hangs...

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Projects

Projects (7)
Project
I aim to spend my postdoctoral fellowship working on the publication of research that has emerged from and around my doctoral dissertation, and then extending this research in a number of directions. My doctoral dissertation explores South African writing about London from 1948 onwards, using case studies that explore the writing of Peter Abrahams, Dan Jacobson, Todd Matshikiza, Arthur Nortje, J.M. Coetzee, Justin Cartwright and Ishtiyaq Shukri. Although there have been have been many rich and varied studies of London as a literary city, and particularly of the ways in which London has been transformed by waves of migration from “the commonwealth”, there is currently no substantial study that puts South African writing specifically into conversation with studies of London. I hope that my research will therefore be a valuable and original contribution to the existing body of contemporary literary criticism concerning both South African writing and representations of London. I will set out to make these interventions into the body of knowledge around both literary London and South African literature available in various forms during my postdoctoral fellowship, which is funded by the Andrew W. Mellon foundation and which forms part of a larger research project at Rhodes University's Department of English on 'Intersecting Diasporas'.