Salvador Santino Jr Regilme

Salvador Santino Jr Regilme
Leiden University | LEI · Leiden University Institute for History

PhD (Freie Universität Berlin); Fox Fellowship (Yale); MA (Universität Osnabrück)

About

70
Publications
52,708
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322
Citations
Citations since 2017
46 Research Items
299 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
Introduction
​Salvador Santino Fulo Regilme Jr. (born 1986) is an International Relations scholar focusing on global human rights norms, global governance, and foreign aid in the context of international development. He is a tenured academic at the International Studies and History section of the Institute of History within the Faculty of Humanities of the University of Leiden, the Netherlands. He is currently working on two main research projects: (1) the impact of United States foreign aid on state repression & human rights in recipient states; and, (2) the role of discourses in the formation of constitutional orders and human rights norms in oligarchic societies.
Additional affiliations
January 2020 - January 2020
Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity
Position
  • Researcher
September 2016 - present
Leiden University
Position
  • Lecturer
April 2015 - December 2015
University of Duisburg-Essen
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
October 2011 - February 2015
Freie Universität Berlin
Field of study
  • Political Science and North American Studies
October 2009 - August 2011
Universität Osnabrück
Field of study
  • Political Science - Democratic Governance and Civil Society

Publications

Publications (70)
Article
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What is the relationship between Thailand’s human rights crisis during Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra’s leadership (2001–2006) and the USA-led post-9/11 war on terror? Why did the human rights situation dramatically deteriorate after the Thaksin regime publicly supported the Bush administration’s war on terror and consequently received US counte...
Book
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Over the last decade, the United States' position as the world's most powerful state has appeared increasingly unstable. The US invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, non-traditional security threats, global economic instability, the apparent spread of authoritarianism and illiberal politics, together with the rise of emerging powers from the Global So...
Article
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Is American power in decline? What is the relationship between the perceived decline of American power and the rise of Donald Trump and authoritarian politics elsewhere? Understanding the puzzle of American decline and the world order requires the recognition of how capital and wealth are unjustly distributed, entrenched, and sustained across the s...
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The goal of this chapter is to present an analytic overview of what the potential of American decline means for rising powers on a global scale. The chapter argues that while indicators suggest American power has been declining, the shape this takes and the extent to which it falters will depend upon the contingency of global politics related to ov...
Book
Does foreign aid promote human rights? As the world’s largest aid donor, the United States has provided foreign assistance to more than 200 countries. Deploying global numerical data on US foreign aid and comparative historical analysis of America’s post–Cold War foreign policies in Southeast Asia, Aid Imperium provides the most comprehensive expla...
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The literature on dignity in international politics can be analytically evaluated based on three key themes: (a) historical, conceptual, and political underpinnings; (b) international law and global governance; and (c) the global political economy. Although discussions of human dignity within these three themes draw on varied disciplines (philosoph...
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Has U.S. foreign aid led to advancements in rights or increased repression in Southeast Asia?
Article
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This article addresses two key questions concerning US foreign aid under the 45th US President, Donald Trump (2017–21): Did the Trump administration radically restructure the foreign aid apparatus of the US government amid the recent reemergence of China as a key state actor in international development and global governance? If so, how and under w...
Article
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The widespread use of private military and security companies (PMSCs) in United Nations peacebuilding missions often undermines the effectiveness of these missions. PMSCs tend to encourage, in unnecessary ways, what is called security risk management and promote the militarization of humanitarian efforts. They encourage humanitarian aid organizatio...
Article
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The concept of right to human dignity refers to the proposition that all human beings possess an inherent and inalienable value and deserve utmost respect and protection from all forms of institutionalized and individual acts of exploitation.
Article
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The global moral appeal of human rights and democratic governance appears to be in severe crisis. In both the Global North and the South, many countries have witnessed the rise of racist, sexist, and illiberal politicians into the highest positions in the government. As one of Asia's oldest electoral democracies, the Philippines is not an exception...
Article
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What is peace? In the age of decreasing global appetite for liberal democracy, how does the notion of peace prefigure in the political discourse of emerging far-right politicians? The concept of peace constitutes one of the most contentious discursive tools in modern politics. Peace is a fuzzy meta-discourse, which means that its discursive invocat...
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Why does an increase in foreign aid from the United States appear to correlate with a rise in human rights abuses in recipient countries, Salvador Santino Fulo Regilme of Leiden University asks. In a forthcoming book, he argues that in Southeast Asia the converging interests of donor and recipient, together with the domestic legitimacy of the benef...
Article
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Despite the consolidated body of public international law on children’s rights and armed conflict, why do armed rebel groups and state forces deploy children in armed conflict, particularly in Somalia? First, due to the lack of alternative sources of income and livelihood beyond armed conflict, children join the army due to coercive recruitment by...
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China is emerging as a key state actor in international development – a sector that has been dominated by the United States for decades. US and Chinese foreign aid programs can be compared on the basis of several benchmarks: 1) official state definition and accounting of foreign aid programs; 2) historical foundations and origins; 3) sectoral distr...
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In the post-9/11 context, citizenship in the global North has been reoriented towards the concept of public security. Much of this lay in political rhetoric definitions of who is a threat to the security of a nation state, with a particular emphasis on the 'threat-ening Other'. The 'war on terror' motivated governments to revoke the citizenship of...
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Why did the use of drone strikes proliferate during the first term of the Obama administration? This paper espouses two key preliminary and exploratory arguments. First, deploying theoretical insights from historical institutionalism, we argue that the Obama administration, despite its initial resistance to the existing counterterror agenda, found...
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Since the start of the 21st century, humanity has faced at least three global crises. The first crisis pertains to the 9/11 terror attacks in the US that facilitated the US-led war on terror, which in turn, facilitated the expansion of state surveillance systems, widespread extrajudicial killings, and the prevalent use of torture and other abusive...
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Peace is one of the most widely used yet highly contested concepts in contemporary politics. What constitutes peace? That broad analytic inquiry motivates this article, which focuses on the contentious discourses of peace within a society besieged by widespread trafficking and use of illegal drugs. Focusing on the illegal drug problem in Colombia a...
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Book review essay of Constitutional democracy in crisis?
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Global shift refers to the transformative, transitionary, aggregate, and multidimensional processes whereby a state, or a group of states, actively and strategically challenges the dominant power position of a status quo global hegemon or a leading group of states.
Preprint
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This is the preprint version (before peer-review). Updated version: DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-74336-3_326-1 Please cite as:
Preprint
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far-right policies and discourses have introduced policies that are seen as detrimental to the welfare of many vulnerable groups including indigenous populations. In the Asia-Pacific, two of the most vibrant electoral democracies in the region-Thailand and the Philippines-have recently backtracked from its democratic commitments and have violently...
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What is the relationship between constitutional order and the emergence of oligarchic politics in contemporary democratic societies? How and to what extent does constitutional design contribute to oligarchic politics in contemporary liberal democratic states? Focusing on constitutional discourses, rather than the legal positivist interpretation of...
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Why did claimant states in the South China Sea (SCS) dispute, especially China, recently increase its militarization activities, in ways that were relatively absent in the previous decades? Why is Beijing, under the Xi Jinping-led government, building artificial islands in a highly disputed maritime area that several Asian states have contentiously...
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Why did claimant states in the South China Sea (SCS) dispute, especially China, recently increase its militarization activities, in unprecedented ways that were relatively absent in the previous decades? Espousing an analytically eclectic explanation rather than using one single International Relations (IR) paradigm, this essay demonstrates three k...
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How and to what extent do ideas and political discourses shape bilateral cooperation between a powerful state and its weaker ally? Why do weaker states act in ways that diverge from the expectations and preferences of the powerful state despite the contractual agreement borne out of bilateral cooperation? Drawing perspectives from constructivism an...
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This review essay highlights the limitations and possibilities of a global human rights order based on analysis of five recently published books about human rights. The main argument states that reform of the global human rights order requires not only a shift to a more emancipatory notion of human dignity but also an emphasis on global justice and...
Article
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What is the relationship between Thailand’s human rights crisis during Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra’s leadership (2001–2006) and the USA-led post-9/11 war on terror? Why did the human rights situation dramatically deteriorate after the Thaksin regime publicly supported the Bush administration’s war on terror and consequently received US counte...
Chapter
Full-text available
Every year, millions of people move over very extensive geographical distances, with the aim of temporarily or permanently residing in their new destinations. At the transnational level, this migration phenomenon can be seen in various instances: Mexicans who are crossing the border to the United States; the global Filipino diaspora who are constan...
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Despite having the earliest exposure to electoral democratic practices in the Asia-Pacific region, the Philippines remains to be one of the least stable democracies in the Global South. Notwithstanding the return of electoral democracy in 1986 after two decades of authoritarian rule, the Philippine state has yet to consolidate its democratic regime...
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In today's age of increasing globalization and the emergence of global public policy issues, the concepts of civil society, public sphere, and the legitimacy of the legal system require further analytical scrutiny and philosophical reflection. As such, this article reflects on how the renowned German philosopher and social theorist Jürgen Habermas,...
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What are the causes of state-initiated human rights violations? Are intra-national factors alone causally responsible for the emergence of human rights crises in the developing world? This essay critically examines contemporary social science literature on the causes of human rights compliance and violations, more particularly in the fields of inte...
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Drawing primarily from social constructivist perspectives, this essay traces the contemporary interregional relations of East Asia and the European Union (EU). Considering the constructivist themes of shared identity and interests, I argue that there are fundamental difficulties found in these interregional relations, which must be urgently address...
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Historically, narratives about the grandiosity of absolute monarchy and social discipline dominated the research agenda on European absolutism, as in the case of the renowned works of Norbert Elias. Yet, less emphasis was made about the various levels of powers existing outside the central monarchy and the importance of other institutions in laying...
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Most of the world’s pressing issues of today will never be effectively resolved if we do not strengthen our democracies. Thus, the risk of collapse of democracies will also mean a risk of collapse of human societies resulting from our incompetence to effectively resolve global public policy problems.
Article
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Book Review: Giorgio Agamben, Alain Badiou, Daniel Bensaïd, Wendy Brown, Jean-Luc Nancy, Jacques Ranciere, Kristin Ross, and Slavoj Zizek, "Democracy in What State?" Translated by William Mccuaig, Columbia University Press, New York, 2010. 144pp., $22.50 / £15.50 hb
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Book Review: Johan Saravanamuttu, ed., Islam and Politics in Southeast Asia (London and New York: Routledge, 2010), 188 pages.
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Book Review: Singh, Bilveer. (2007). The Talibanization of South East Asia: Losing the War on Terror to Islamist Extremists. U.S.A.: Praeger Security International.
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Utilising constructivism this work analyses the contemporary relational complexities of East Asia vis-à-vis the European Union (EU). Mindful of the social constructivist themes of identity and interests, it is argued that there are fundamental difficulties found in these interregional relations, which must be urgently addressed. The EU continues to...
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Book Review of the Monograph: McCoy, Alfred (2009), Policing America’s Empire: The United States, the Philippines, and the Rise of the Surveillance State, Madison, Wisconsin: The University of Wisconsin Press ISBN 978-0-299-23414-0, 659 pages
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Book Review: Currency and Contest in East Asia: The Great Power Politics of Financial Regionalism by William Grimes (Cornell University Press, 2009).

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
This multidisciplinary conference aims to analyze the causes and consequences of various contemporary challenges to international human rights and emancipatory politics. First, the seminar examines whether, and if so, how the apparently declining influence of the West, the rise of authoritarianism, and increasing material inequality within and between nations could impact the legitimacy and effectiveness of international human rights. Second, the seminar invites new and radical perspectives that aim to reinvent the future of transnational human rights norms and human dignity — its substantive content, ethical assumptions, as well as its representative global and national institutions. Third, the seminar brings together leading and promising scholars in conversation with human rights practitioners in an effort to bring a dynamic and fruitful debate that bridges theory and practice. We hope to be able to attract paper presenters from a diverse set of expertise and professional experience on human rights — ranging from the humanities, social sciences, and human rights practice. We welcome paper proposals that reflect a wide variety of perspectives on human rights scholarship and practice, especially those that deal with theoretical and practical issues about human rights in the Global South. The following key questions represent some but not all of the puzzles that we seek to address: • What are the key limitations and milestones of post-Second World War international human rights norms — particularly in terms of its conceptual basis, historical appreciation, and normative underpinnings? In what ways could those limitations be remedied? In what ways could the milestones and strengths of the global human rights regime be reinforced? • What are the plausible causes of the rise of illiberal and authoritarian discourses and movements in global politics? How and in what ways do these discourses and challenges relate to international human rights norms? • Does the contemporary international human rights regime need a radical reform? If so, what constitutes radical reform? This two-day conference will be held in The Hague at Leiden University's Campus Den Haag on 6-7 June 2019. We hope that the conference would be a starting point towards building an international network of scholars and practitioners interested in rethinking emancipatory politics and human rights during these very challenging times. We expect to publish an edited volume or a special issue in an academic journal based on the paper contributions from this conference. Please submit your proposed abstract (maximum of 350 words) and a short biographical note (maximum of 150 words) with your contact details in PDF attached to the email. Proposals can be sent on or before 15th November 2018, 17:00 CET to globalhumanrights@hum.leidenuniv.nl. We can provide travel expense support for accepted paper presenters from a minority group and/or systematically underprivileged backgrounds. If that is the case, then please write a short justification note for your request for travel support. Due to very limited funds, we are unable to accommodate all requests for travel support of accepted participants, but funding applications will be assessed based on compelling financial need and the potential to increase the analytic coverage of the conference. This conference is supported by the Leiden University’s Global Interactions Grant.