Sally Street

Sally Street
University of St Andrews · Centre for Biological Diversity

BA, MSc, PhD

About

32
Publications
4,865
Reads
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920
Citations
Citations since 2016
23 Research Items
869 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
Additional affiliations
September 2010 - March 2014
University of St Andrews
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
It is widely believed that juvenile male mammals typically engage in higher rates of rough and tumble play (RTP) than do females, in preparation for adult roles involving intense physical competition between males. The consistency of this sex difference across diverse mammalian species has, however, not yet been systematically investigated, limitin...
Article
Full-text available
1. The size of a bird's nest can play a key role in ensuring reproductive success and is determined by a variety of factors. The primary function of the nest is to protect offspring from the environment and predators. Field studies in a number of passerine species have indicated that higher-latitude populations in colder habitats build larger nests...
Article
Full-text available
The drivers of divergent scleral morphologies in primates are currently unclear, though white sclerae are often assumed to underlie human hyper-cooperative behaviours. Humans are unusual in possessing depigmented sclerae whereas many other extant primates, including the closely-related chimpanzee, possess dark scleral pigment. Here, we use phylogen...
Article
Full-text available
Demography, particularly population size, plays a key role in cultural complexity. However, the relationship between population size and complexity appears to vary across domains: while studies of technology typically find a positive correlation, the opposite is true for language, and the role of population size in complexity in the arts remains to...
Article
Full-text available
Ecogeographical rules attempt to explain large-scale spatial patterns in biological traits. One of the most enduring examples is Bergmann's rule, which states that species should be larger in colder climates due to the thermoregulatory advantages of larger body size. Support for Bergmann's rule, however, is not consistent across taxonomic groups, r...
Article
Full-text available
Animal communication has long been thought to be subject to pressures and constraints associated with social relationships. However, our understanding of how the nature and quality of social relationships relates to the use and evolution of communication is limited by a lack of directly comparable methods across multiple levels of analysis. Here, w...
Article
Life history is a robust correlate of relative brain size: larger-brained mammals and birds have slower life histories and longer lifespans than smaller-brained species. The cognitive buffer hypothesis (CBH) proposes an adaptive explanation for this relationship: large brains may permit greater behavioural flexibility and thereby buffer the animal...
Preprint
Life history is a robust correlate of relative brain size: large-brained mammals and birds have slower life histories and longer lifespans than smaller-brained species. One influential adaptive hypothesis to account for this finding is the Cognitive Buffer Hypothesis (CBH). The CBH proposes that large brains permit greater behavioural flexibility a...
Article
Full-text available
Women appear to copy other women's preferences for men's faces. This 'mate-choice copying' is often taken as evidence of psychological adaptations for processing social information related to mate choice, for which facial information is assumed to be particularly salient. No experiment, however, has directly investigated whether women preferentiall...
Article
Explanations for primate brain expansion and the evolution of human cognition and culture remain contentious despite extensive research. While multiple comparative analyses have investigated variation in brain size across primate species, very few have addressed why primates vary in how much they use social learning. Here, we evaluate the hypothesi...
Article
Full-text available
Competing theoretical models make different predictions on which life history strategies facilitate growth of small populations. While 'fast' strategies allow for rapid increase in population size and limit vulnerability to stochastic events, 'slow' strategies and bet-hedging may reduce variance in vital rates in response to stochasticity. We test...
Chapter
Social learning-learning influenced by observation of, or interaction with, other animals -allows individuals to acquire information, concerning, for instance, the location and quality of food, mates, predators, rivals, and pathways, as well as foraging techniques, vocalizations and a variety of social behavior. Intelligence can be broadly defined...
Article
Full-text available
In birds and primates, the frequency of behavioural innovation has been shown to covary with absolute and relative brain size, leading to the suggestion that large brains allow animals to innovate, and/or that selection for innovativeness, together with social learning, may have driven brain enlargement. We examined the relationship between primate...
Article
Full-text available
In some species of Old World monkeys and apes, females exhibit exaggerated swellings of the anogenital region that vary in size across the ovarian cycle. Exaggerated swellings are typically largest around the time of ovulation, and swelling size has been reported to correlate positively with female quality, supporting the hypothesis that exaggerate...
Article
Full-text available
Why some organisms become invasive when introduced into novel regions while others fail to even establish is a fundamental question in ecology. Barriers to success are expected to filter species at each stage along the invasion pathway. No study to date, however, has investigated how species traits associate with success from introduction to spread...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Previous studies on behavior evolution in birds reported that measures of both technical innovation (e.g. tool using) and non-technical innovation (e.g. novel food discovery) correlate with brain size. In primates, a correlation between general innovation and brain size has been corroborated, but no analyses on the differences between technical and...
Article
Despite the accumulation of structural descriptions of bird nests and considerable diversity in these structures across species, we know little about why birds build the nests that they do. Here we used phylogenetic comparative analyses to test one suggested explanation, specifically for Old World babblers (Timaliidae): that building a domed nest c...
Article
Full-text available
Hominin reliance on Oldowan stone tools—which appear from 2.5 mya and are believed to have been socially transmitted—has been hypothesized to have led to the evolution of teaching and language. Here we present an experiment investigating the efficacy of transmission of Oldowan tool-making skills along chains of adult human participants (N = 184) us...
Article
Full-text available
Wood, Kressel, Joshi, and Louie (2014) thoroughly evaluate the evidence for menstrual cycle shifts in ratings of several male characteristics and conclude that their analyses fail to provide supportive evidence for consistent cycle effects. The topic of menstrual cycle shifts in mate preferences has been strongly debated, with disagreements over bo...
Article
Full-text available
Across the brains of different bird species, the cerebellum varies greatly in the amount of surface folding (foliation). The degree of cerebellar foliation is thought to correlate positively with the processing capacity of the cerebellum, supporting complex motor abilities, particularly manipulative skills. Here, we tested this hypothesis by invest...

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