Sage E.P. Boettcher

Sage E.P. Boettcher
University of Oxford | OX

PhD

About

40
Publications
2,374
Reads
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284
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2014 - October 2016
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Position
  • Research Assistant
May 2012 - June 2014
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Full-text available
In "hybrid search" tasks, such as finding items on a grocery list, one must search the scene for targets while also searching the list in memory. How is the representation of a visual item compared with the representations of items in the memory set? Predominant theories would propose a role for visual working memory (VWM) either as the site of the...
Article
The items on a memorized grocery list are not relevant in every aisle; for example, it is useless to search for the cabbage in the cereal aisle. It might be beneficial if one could mentally partition the list so only the relevant subset was active, so that vegetables would be activated in the produce section. In four experiments, we explored observ...
Article
Full-text available
The arrangement of the contents of real-world scenes follows certain spatial rules that allow for extremely efficient visual exploration. What remains underexplored is the role different types of objects hold in a scene. In the current work, we seek to unveil an important building block of scenes-anchor objects. Anchors hold specific spatial predic...
Article
Despite many recent technical advances, the human efficacy of naturalistic scene processing is still unparalleled. What guides attention in real world environments? How does scene context affect object search and classification? And how are the many predictions we have with regards to our visual environment structured? Here, we review the latest fi...
Article
Probabilistic associations between stimuli afford memory templates that guide perception through pro-active anticipatory mechanisms. A great deal of work has examined the behavioural consequences and human electrophysiological substrates of anticipation following probabilistic memory cues that carry spatial or temporal information to guide percepti...
Article
In everyday life, we often anticipate the timing of an upcoming task or event while actively engaging in another. Here, we investigated the effects of predictable temporal structure within such a multi-task scenario. In a visual working-memory task, we manipulated whether the onset of a working-memory probe could be predicted in time, while also em...
Article
Full-text available
Children's ability to benefit from spatiotemporal regularities to detect goal-relevant targets was tested in a dynamic, extended context. Young adults and children (from a low-deprivation area school in the United Kingdom; N = 80; 5–6 years; 39 female; ethics approval did not permit individual-level race/ethnicity surveying) completed a dynamic vis...
Preprint
This study tested whether observers can benefit from temporal regularities occurring within dynamic and distraction-filled contexts to identify target stimuli. Across two online experiments, participants searched for multiple targets amongst distractors in dynamic visual- search tasks in which coloured stimuli faded in and out of the display at dif...
Article
Protecting working-memory content from distracting external sensory inputs and intervening tasks is an ubiquitous demand in daily life. Here, we ask whether and how temporal expectations about external events can help mitigate effects of such interference during working-memory retention. We manipulated the temporal predictability of interfering ite...
Article
Full-text available
Visual search is a fundamental element of human behavior and is predominantly studied in a laboratory setting using static displays. However, real-life search is often an extended process taking place in dynamic environments. We have designed a dynamic-search task in order to incorporate the temporal dimension into visual search. Using this task, w...
Preprint
In everyday life, we often anticipate the timing of one upcoming task or event while actively engaging in another. Here, we investigated temporal expectations within such a multi-task scenario. In a visual working-memory task, we manipulated whether the onset of a working-memory probe could be predicted in time, while also embedding a simple interv...
Preprint
Protecting working-memory content from distracting external sensory inputs and intervening tasks is a ubiquitous demand in daily life. Here, we ask whether and how temporal expectations about external events can help mitigate effects of such interference during working-memory retention. We manipulated the temporal predictability of interfering item...
Article
Full-text available
Working memory serves as the buffer between past sensations and future behavior, making it vital to understand not only how we encode and retain sensory information in memory but also how we plan for its upcoming use. We ask when prospective action goals emerge alongside the encoding and retention of visual information in working memory. We show th...
Preprint
Full-text available
It is believed that children have difficulties in guiding attention while facing distraction. However, developmental accounts of spatial attention rely on traditional search designs using static displays. In real life, dynamic environments can embed regularities that afford anticipation and benefit performance. We developed a dynamic visual-search...
Article
Full-text available
In everyday life, attentional templates-which facilitate the perception of task-relevant sensory inputs-are often based on associations in long-term memory. We ask whether templates retrieved from memory are necessarily faithful reproductions of the encoded information or if associative-memory templates can be functionally adapted after retrieval i...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A fully developed human mind constitutes a predictive system, continuously exploiting regularities in our environment to anticipate events proactively. However, it is unknown whether this fundamental property of behaviour exists in younger ages. There are certain trade-offs between cognitive abilities most relevant at childhood vs. adulthood. For e...
Article
Full-text available
The brain constitutes a predictive system that is constantly learning about regularities in the environment and utilizing these regularities to anticipate events. Studies have shown that expectations improve performance by altering perception and allowing motor preparation. However, behaviour also benefits from temporal predictions by guiding spati...
Poster
Visual working memory supports the retention of relevant information even when it is no longer physically present and helps to bridge past visual sensations to potential future actions. Yet visual working memory and action planning have been primarily studied in isolation. We recently showed that action plans can be accessed from working memory sim...
Article
Suppose you go to the supermarket with a shopping list of 10 items held in memory. Your shopping expedition can be seen as a combination of visual search and memory search. This is known as “hybrid search.” There is a growing interest in understanding how hybrid search tasks are accomplished. We used eye tracking to examine how manipulating the num...
Conference Paper
Objects in real-world scenes follow a set of rules, "scene grammar", that allow us to interact with our environment with ease. However, the particulars behind this set of rules are not fully understood. We propose that scene grammar is hierarchically structured. As a testing hypothesis we will primarily differentiate between three unique levels: Sc...
Article
Full-text available
This paper introduces the "hybrid foraging" paradigm. In typical visual search tasks, observers search for one instance of one target among distractors. In hybrid search, observers search through visual displays for one instance of any of several types of target held in memory. In foraging search, observers collect multiple instances of a single ta...
Article
In "hybrid" search tasks, observers hold multiple possible targets in memory while searching for those targets among distractor items in visual displays. Wolfe (2012) found that, if the target set is held constant over a block of trials, reaction times (RTs) in such tasks were a linear function of the number of items in the visual display and a lin...
Article
Full-text available
In "hybrid search" (Wolfe Psychological Science, 23(7), 698-703, 2012), observers search through visual space for any of multiple targets held in memory. With photorealistic objects as the stimuli, response times (RTs) increase linearly with the visual set size and logarithmically with the memory set size, even when over 100 items are committed to...
Article
A longstanding question in visual search is when to stop searching in one display and move to the next one. This complex question becomes more complex as the number of potential targets increases, and the task begins to resemble the ecological problem of foraging (Cain, Vul, Clark, & Mitroff, 2012; Wolfe, 2013). Work to date has involved static ima...
Article
Full-text available
The resolution of temporal attention is limited in a manner that makes it difficult to identify two targets in short succession. This limitation produces the phenomenon known as the attentional blink (AB), in which processing of a first target (T1) impairs identification of a second target (T2). In the AB literature, there is broad agreement that i...
Article
Emotion-induced blindness (EIB) refers to impaired awareness for items appearing soon after an irrelevant, emotionally arousing stimulus. In previous research we analyzed the mechanisms responsible for EIB using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Participants searched rapidly presented streams of pictures (landscapes and cityscapes) for a targe...
Article
Consider a radiologist searching a mammogram for tumors, a baggage screener searching for weapons, or an intelligence analyst poring over satellite imagery of North Korea. In each of these visual search tasks, each image contains an unknown number of targets and there are many images to get through. How do observers choose when to move to the next...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
Previous studies already demonstrated that non-spatial object sounds do facilitate search through artificial displays (Iordanescu, Grabowecky, Franconeri, Theeuwes & Suzuki 2010) but not through scenes (Seidel, Draschkow & Võ 2018). This project tries to identify factors that determine if sounds facilitate search or not. In addition we evaluate if sounds influence search through memory (MSS), search through objects (VSS), or both. To answer these questions our experimental design mimicked prior hybrid search experiments (Wolfe, 2012).