Sabine Stuart-Hill

Sabine Stuart-Hill
Universität Koblenz-Landau · Institute for Integrated Natural Sciences

PhD

About

14
Publications
29,904
Reads
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427
Citations
Citations since 2017
8 Research Items
356 Citations
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Introduction
The years of my academic career in southern Africa are shaped by interdisciplinary research in the area of 'Sustainable Transformations' in the sense of human influence on landscape development from local to national level. The topics of resource management and governance especially with their related practices and tools are central here. My mission is to contextualize such practices and tools in order to find ‘the right mix’ for sustainable and inclusive development.
Additional affiliations
October 2020 - present
Universität Koblenz-Landau
Position
  • Lecturer
January 2013 - September 2020
University of KwaZulu-Natal
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • The CWRR has been established within the School for Agricultural, Earth and Environmental Sciences (SAEES).
January 2007 - December 2012
University of KwaZulu-Natal
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
May 2008 - December 2014
University of KwaZulu-Natal
Field of study
  • Environmental Hydrology

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
The South African constitution enshrines the right to water for the well-being of its people. Recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and governmental reports show that this will be endangered by climate change. Recent high-resolution hydro-climatic model outputs give cause for further concern. Additionally, the South African Government is...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we review current approaches and recent advances in research on climate impacts and adaptation in South Africa. South Africa has a well-developed earth system science research program that underpins the climate change scenarios developed for the southern African region. Established research on the biophysical impacts of climate change...
Article
Through the lens of the 12 OECD Principles on Water Governance, this article examines six water resources and water services frameworks in Europe, Asia-Pacific, Africa and South America to understand enhancing and constraining contextual factors. Qualitative and quantitative methods are used to analyze each framework against four criteria: alignmen...
Article
Scaled up planning and implementation of nature-based solutions requires better understanding of broad characteristics (typologies) of the current governance and financing landscape, collaborative approaches amidst local complexities, and factors of scalability. An inventory was compiled of water-related ecological infrastructure intervention proje...
Article
This paper explores the 12 OECD Principles on Water Governance through the lens of six existing frameworks in Europe, Asia-Pacific, Africa and South America to understand contextual factors enhancing or constraining water governance. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to analyse each framework against four criteria: alignment with...
Preprint
This reprint reports on a project we conducted for the Water Research Commission on lessons learnt in establishing South Africa's catchment managemnt agencies.
Research
Fieldnote for the Water Information Network – South Africa (WIN-SA). Water Research Commission, Pretoria.
Chapter
Full-text available
The establishment of catchment management agencies goes beyond the involvement of governmental entities or the stipulations contained in regulatory structures and policies. A number of actors or stakeholders from both the governmental and non-governmental spheres are involved in establishing a CMA. Practices that are associated with CMA establishme...
Article
Southern Africa is considered to be highly vulnerable to the effects of global change. There is increasing evidence of negative demographic and environmental changes influenced by anthropogenic driven local changes in this region and this results in vulnerability exacerbated by the overarching effects of climate change. These are exemplified by the...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Archived project
Even with the manifold challenges of the uMngeni River and its catchment the system continues to provide the resources required to sustain the economy of this growing region, supporting human wellbeing, economic development, social needs and ecosystem services. The critical question facing the catchment is how to sustain and enhance water security in the catchment. The role of ecological infrastructure (EI) in enhancing and sustaining water and sanitation delivery in the catchment has been recognised. The overall aim of this project was to identify where and how investment into the protection and/or restoration of EI can be made to produce long-term and sustainable returns in terms of water security assurance. In short, the project aimed to guide catchment managers when deciding “what to do” in the catchment. The research is funded by the Water Research Commission of South Africa.
Project
The WEF Nexus is argued to be valuable for understanding complex systems, and for decision making to achieve macro-scale sustainable development. However, the ultimate measure of success for achieving sustainable development is measured at a different scale, namely, the improved livelihoods and wellbeing of individuals and households. Nexus research has so far remained weak in identifying how the Nexus is interlinked with livelihoods. In the South African context, a deeper understanding is needed of how the Nexus framework can assist in building livelihood resilience across the socio-economic spectrum, and in shifting towards a sustainable economy. The research is funded by the Water Research Commission of South Africa.
Project
The overall objective is to develop an evidence-based integrated framework and prototype “investment case” for strengthening water-related Ecological Infrastructure (EI). The project will generate new knowledge by combining livelihoods and value chain analysis with the EI approach to water management and next-generation hydroclimatic modelling at optimum spatial resolution. The research design is based on an inter- and transdisciplinary approach pursuing integration and scaling up across the Berg-Breede and Greater uMngeni catchments in South Africa. The catchments contain strategic water sources upstream and large cities downstream (Cape Town, Durban) with strong rural-urban linkages. Both catchments have a maximized engineered water supply system with deteriorating water quality and no further options for engineered or built (‘hard’) infrastructure (BI). The project is funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark.