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Sabiha Majumder

Sabiha Majumder
ETH Zurich | ETH Zürich · Department of Environmental Systems Science

PhD

About

11
Publications
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105
Citations

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Aim Theory suggests that as ecological systems approach regime shifts, they become increasingly slow in recovering from perturbations. This phenomenon, known as critical slowing down [CSD], leads to spatial and temporal signatures in ecological state variables, thus potentially offering early indicators of regime shifts. Indicators using temporal d...
Article
Theory suggests that ecological systems exhibit a pronounced slow down in their dynamics, known as 'critical slowing down' (CSD), before they undergo regime shifts or critical transitions. As a result of CSD, ecosystems exhibit characteristic temporal and spatial changes which can be used as early warning signals of imminent regime shifts. For temp...
Article
Full-text available
1.Some ecosystems show non‐linear responses to gradual changes in environmental conditions, once a threshold in conditions ‐ or critical point ‐ is passed. This can lead to wide shifts in ecosystem states, possibly with dramatic ecological and economic consequences. Such behaviors have been reported in drylands, savannas, coral reefs or shallow lak...
Article
Strong positive feedback is considered a necessary condition to observe abrupt shifts in ecosystems. A few previous studies have shown that demographic noise—arising from the probabilistic and discrete nature of birth and death processes in finite systems—makes the transitions gradual. In this paper, we investigate the impact of demographic noise o...
Preprint
Full-text available
Strong positive feedback is considered a necessary condition to observe abrupt shifts of ecosystems. A few previous studies have shown that demographic noise -- arising from the probabilistic and discrete nature of birth and death processes in finite systems -- makes the transitions gradual or continuous. In this paper, we show that demographic noi...
Article
Full-text available
1.In diverse ecosystems, organisms cluster together in such a manner that the frequency distribution of cluster‐sizes is a power‐law function. Spatially‐explicit computational models of ecosystems suggest that a loss of such power‐law clustering may indicate a loss of ecosystem resilience; the empirical evidence in support for this hypothesis has b...
Article
Ecosystems can undergo abrupt transitions between alternative stable states when the driver crosses a critical threshold. Dynamical systems theory shows that when ecosystems approach the point of loss of stability associated with these transitions, they take a long time to recover from perturbations, a phenomenon known as critical slowing down. Thi...
Preprint
Diverse ecosystems exhibit clusters that follow scale-free size distributions and lack a characteristic scale. In phase-transition theory, it is well known that scale-free behaviours arise at critical points. Scale-free behaviours, therefore, typically indicate a lack of resilience. Yet, many ecological studies associate loss of scale-free clusteri...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ecosystems can undergo abrupt transitions from one state to an alternative stable state when the driver crosses a threshold or a critical point. Dynamical systems theory suggests that systems take long to recover from perturbations near such transitions. This leads to characteristic changes in the dynamics of the system, which can be used as early...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Evidences from various ecosystems, ranging from lakes to semi-arid ecosystems, suggest that gradually changing drivers can cause abrupt state shifts from one stable state to an alternative stable state. Such shifts, also called critical transitions, can often be irreversible and may result in significant ecological as...

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