S. Andreas Angermayr

S. Andreas Angermayr
CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine | CeMM

PhD

About

18
Publications
3,532
Reads
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1,106
Citations
Additional affiliations
February 2017 - January 2019
University of Cologne
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2015 - January 2017
IST Austria
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2008 - September 2014
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
August 2008 - September 2014
University of Amsterdam
Field of study
  • Molecular Microbiology
October 2005 - December 2005
University of Rochester
Field of study
  • Cell Biology
April 2005 - October 2007
Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Field of study
  • Molecular Microbiology

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Understanding interactions between antibiotics used in combination is an important theme in microbiology. Using the interactions between the antifolate drug trimethoprim and the ribosome-targeting antibiotic erythromycin in Escherichia coli as a model, we applied a transcriptomic approach for dissecting interactions between two antibiotics with dif...
Article
In Escherichia coli, the expression of heterologous genes for the production of recombinant proteins can be challenging due to the codon bias of different organisms. The rare codons AGG and AGA are among the rarest in E. coli. In this work, by using the human gene RioK2 as case study, we found that the presence of consecutive AGG‐AGA led to a prema...
Article
Full-text available
Background Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology of cyanobacteria offer a promising sustainable alternative approach for fossil-based ethylene production, by using sunlight via oxygenic photosynthesis, to convert carbon dioxide directly into ethylene. Towards this, both well-studied cyanobacteria, i.e., Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 and Synechoco...
Article
Cyanobacteria are mostly engineered to be sustainable cell-factories by genetic manipulations alone. Here, by modulating the concentration of allosteric effectors, we focus on increasing product formation without further burdening the cells with increased expression of enzymes. Resorting to a novel 96-well microplate cultivation system for cyanobac...
Article
Importance: Industrial scale biotechnological applications are anticipated for cyanobacteria. We simulated large-scale high cell-density culturing of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under a diel light regime in a lab-scale photobioreactor. In BG-11 medium, Synechocystis grows only in the light. Metabolite analysis groups the collected samples according...
Article
Both enantiomers of lactic acid, l-lactic acid and d-lactic acid, can be produced in a sustainable way by a photosynthetic microbial cell factory and thus from CO2, sunlight, and water. Several properties of polylactic acid (a polyester of polymerized lactic acid) depend on the controlled blend of these two enantiomers. Recently, cyanobacterium Syn...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Photosynthetic cyanobacteria are attractive for a range of biotechnological applications including biofuel production. However, due to slow growth, screening of mutant libraries using microtiter plates is not feasible. Results: We present a method for high-throughput, single-cell analysis and sorting of genetically engineered l-lacta...
Article
Through metabolic engineering cyanobacteria can be employed in biotechnology. Combining the capacity for oxygenic photosynthesis and carbon fixation with an engineered metabolic pathway allows carbon-based product formation from CO2, light, and water directly. Such cyanobacterial 'cell factories' are constructed to produce biofuels, bioplastics, an...
Conference Paper
In order to develop a strategy to engineer a metabolic module of a microbial species such that it produces a compound of interest, detailed knowledge and understanding of the organisms’ genetic, metabolic and regulatory networks as well as of the interactions between these networks is needed. Efficient and robust production is rarely, if ever, the...
Article
Full-text available
Background Molecular engineering of the intermediary physiology of cyanobacteria has become important for the sustainable production of biofuels and commodity compounds from CO2 and sunlight by “designer microbes.” The chemical commodity product L-lactic acid can be synthesized in one step from a key intermediary metabolite of these organisms, pyru...
Article
The direct and efficient conversion of CO2 into liquid energy carriers and/or bulk chemicals is crucial for a sustainable future of modern society. Here we describe the production of 2,3-butanediol in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 expressing a heterologous catabolic pathway derived from enteric- and lactic acid bacteria. This pathway is composed of an...
Article
Oxygenic photosynthesis will have a key role in a sustainable future. It is therefore significant that this process can be engineered in organisms such as cyanobacteria, to construct cell factories that catalyze the (sun) light-driven conversion of CO2 and water into products like ethanol, butanol, or other bio-fuels or lactic acid, a bio-plastic p...
Article
Full-text available
Metabolic engineering of microorganisms has become a versatile tool to facilitate production of bulk chemicals, fuels, etc. Accordingly, CO2 has been exploited via cyanobacterial metabolism as a sustainable carbon source of biofuel and bioplastic precursors. Here we extended these observations by showing that integration of an ldh gene from Bacillu...
Article
Full-text available
Neothyonidioside is a triterpene glycoside (TG) isolated from the sea cucumber, Australostichopus mollis, that is potently cytotoxic to S. cerevisiae, but does not permeabilize cellular membranes. We mutagenized S. cerevisiae and isolated a neothionidioside-resistant (neo(R)) strain. Using synthetic genetic array mapping and sequencing, we identifi...
Article
The world's future energy demand calls for a sustainable alternative for the use of fossil fuels, to restrict further global warming. Harvesting solar energy via photosynthesis is one of Nature's remarkable achievements. Existing technologies exploit this process for energy 'production' via processing of, for example, part of plant biomass into eth...

Projects

Project (1)