S A Hamed Hosseini

S A Hamed Hosseini
The University of Newcastle, Australia · Department of Sociology and Anthropology

PhD in Global Studies and Sociology (2006) - The Australian National University

About

79
Publications
87,438
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304
Citations
Citations since 2016
35 Research Items
242 Citations
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Introduction
As a political and economic sociologist, Hosseini's main field of research is shaped around the globalization of social movements, uprisings, violence, activism, and revolutions. Hosseini's studies particularly focus on the relationships between ideas, identities, political actions and their socioeconomic circumstances including new communication and information technologies. Dr Hosseini's social research is based on a diverse range of mixed and innovative methods and skills;
Additional affiliations
December 2008 - November 2015
The University of Newcastle, Australia
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
January 2002 - August 2006
Australian National University
Field of study
  • Global Studies and Sociology
September 1996 - June 1998
Ferdowsi University Of Mashhad
Field of study
  • Social Inquiry

Publications

Publications (79)
Article
Full-text available
This paper outlines the general principles of a comparatively inclusive analytical framework for the investigation of political identity formation among young Muslims in Western societies. “Political identity”, in general, as a multidimensional social phenomenon with multiple social modalities, has been undertheorized in the mainstream literature....
Article
A new cycle of ideological clashes underpins the economic policy reforms in the aftermath of the 2008 global financial crisis and its continuing uncertainties. This article argues that the evolving complexity of the global economic system, especially after the crisis, has been associated with not only the growth of ideological fragmentations but al...
Book
Full-text available
Conscientious Sociology is an introductory but essential step towards the recognition of paradigmatic contestations and shifts in the post-1970s Social Sciences. It develops an ideal typology of three major paradigms, i.e. the Foundationalist, the Relativist and the Critical-Conscientious Paradigms by discussing and comparing their principles in fo...
Book
Full-text available
The birth of so-called Arab Spring in the Middle East, followed by the rise of Occupy Movements against the North American financial powerhouses, and the spread of anti-austerity uprisings across Europe have stimulated a new wave of scholarly interests in revisiting theories of social movements and revolutions. A new cycle of ideological clashes un...
Article
Full-text available
This article briefly reviews the historical changes in the social theories of collective cognition/knowledge, and reveals a classical divide between two major, supposedly rival, paradigms that still influence mainstream studies, i.e., (1) the realist determinist; and (2) the subjectivist constructionist. This division has prevailed in both humaniti...
Chapter
This chapter presents critiques of the SDGs explored through a comprehensive analysis of the literature on development studies. The criticisms fall under two broad categories: (1) moderate critiques highlighting (i) weak accountability and monitoring systems and (ii) inadequate funding support and (2) radical critiques emphasizing (i) compliance wi...
Preprint
This paper briefly presents the results of a quantitative analysis of data collected through the sixth wave of the World Values Survey (WVS) in 2012 in Australia. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) – a rather sophisticated statistical method to explore interrelated variables/factors and to rule out spurious correlations – is used to explore the so...
Article
Full-text available
This article addresses contradictions in the 'pluriverse' of radical alternatives to maldevelopment, and proposes a an integrative framework for fostering productive convergences among its forces. It argues that the 2020s and 2030s will be pivotal decades, in which the current global conjuncture, characterized by intensifying economic turmoil, clim...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter not only presents a critical review of the contemporary academic literature regarding the "social nature" (basic characteristics), "social manifestations," and "social nurtures" (determining factors, roots, bases, and impacts) of Right-Wing Populism (RWP), but also initiates a conversation to pursue a new consolidative line of theoriza...
Article
Full-text available
Viewed in a world-historical perspective, social change, or social transformation, is not an “event” but rather a constant, a perpetual historical process. Human social organisation is perpetually in motion but within certain parameters of continuity. For over five millennia, since the origins of cities, the state, and class society, human social o...
Method
Full-text available
Surely correlation is widely misused but also has some interesting faculties beyond a simple sense of association or tightness. This short paper discusses the relationship between the correlation coefficient and the regression slope. Read the attached paper and take part in a discussion on this matter here: https://www.researchgate.net/post/Correla...
Chapter
The idea of globalisation has profoundly challenged pre-existing discourses, theories, and practices of ‘development’. However, the separation between the two academic fields of critical development studies (CDS) and critical global(isation) studies (CGS) is ideologically constructed. In this chapter, Hosseini and Gills argue that a transformative...
Method
Full-text available
Imagine we want to explore how optimistic/pessimist a group of people (university students for example) are about their future and what makes them more or less optimistic. This implies a question that guides our research, i.e., a Research Question. Most social inquiries aim to answer one or a few interrelated research questions. One way to answer t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Degrowth is a globally emerging movement that criticizes the emphasis on economic growth within mainstream capitalist economies. Instead, degrowth calls for the shrinking of production and consumption within economies to mitigate the social and environmental impacts of climate change and natural resource depletion. This paper draws on a growing lit...
Article
Full-text available
'Degrowth' is a globally emerging movement that criticizes the emphasis on economic growth within mainstream capitalist economies. Instead, degrowth calls for the shrinking of production and consumption within economies to mitigate the social and environmental impacts of climate change and natural resource depletion. This paper draws on a growing l...
Preprint
p>Any inclusive comprehension of the inner nature, deep structures, and conflictual dynamism of capitalism is potentially a transformative cognitive Commons. Likewise, to achieve an inclusive understanding of the existing post-capitalist praxes and the imaginary visions of utopian futures require cumulative, collective, and cooperative learning. Th...
Preprint
p>Any inclusive comprehension of the inner nature, deep structures, and conflictual dynamism of capitalism is potentially a transformative cognitive Commons. Likewise, to achieve an inclusive understanding of the existing post-capitalist praxes and the imaginary visions of utopian futures require cumulative, collective, and cooperative learning. Th...
Preprint
This paper briefly presents the results of a quantitative analysis of data collected through the sixth wave of the World Values Survey (WVS) in 2012 in Australia. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) – a rather sophisticated statistical method to explore interrelated variables/factors and to rule out spurious correlations – is used to explore the so...
Preprint
This paper briefly presents the results of a quantitative analysis of data collected through the sixth wave of the World Values Survey (WVS) in 2012 in Australia. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) – a rather sophisticated statistical method to explore interrelated variables/factors and to rule out spurious correlations – is used to explore the so...
Preprint
Full-text available
COVID-19 has shown that radical transformations are not only possible but unavoidable to prevent greater implosions. Living through a slow-or de-growth status-where collective "well-living" is gaining primacy over hedonistic well-being-has awakened us to the implausibility of returning to the old normal. Now is the time to quarantine our minds from...
Article
Full-text available
COVID-19 has shown that radical transformations are not only possible but unavoidable to prevent greater implosions. Living through a slow-or de-growth status-where collective "well-living" is gaining primacy over hedonistic well-being-has awakened us to the implausibility of returning to the old normal. Now is the time to quarantine our minds from...
Chapter
Humanity is facing severe planetary and civilizational crises, interrelated and interacting at unprecedented scales. These multiple crises can be traced to the ‘globalization’ of a hegemonic mode of capitalist ‘(mal-)development’. In an increasingly volatile and indeterminate context, critical scholarship in global studies faces numerous challenges...
Book
Full-text available
The Routledge Handbook of Transformative Global Studies provides diverse and cutting-edge perspectives on this fast-changing field. For thirty years the world has been caught in a long ‘global interregnum’, plunging from one crisis to the next and witnessing the emergence of new, vibrant, multiple and sometimes contradictory forms of popular resist...
Chapter
The fields of critical global studies and globalization studies face serious challenges as the result of deepening and interrelated global crises and the emergence of multiple and innovative forms of global uprisings, popular politics and (new) forms of resistance and emancipatory struggle. These crises are driven by remarkably complex structural a...
Article
Evidence is mounting of severe planetary and civilizational crises, interrelated and mutually constitutive of one another at unprecedented scales caused by the ‘globalization’ of a hegemonic mode of civilizational ‘(mal-)development.’ Critical scholarship in both Development and Global(ization) Studies faces numerous challenges on the path to produ...
Article
Full-text available
Universal Basic Income (UBI) appears to offer some potential solutions in relation to the capitalist induced social inequalities within contemporary society. This paper discusses the core values and objectives of a UBI and compares them with the values of neoliberal capitalism. The paper also examines UBI’s strengths and weaknesses, proposing and o...
Preprint
Full-text available
Universal Basic Income (UBI) appears to offer some potential solutions in relation to the capitalist induced social inequalities within contemporary society. This paper discusses the core values and objectives of a UBI and compares them with the values of neoliberal capitalism. The paper also examines UBI’s strengths and weaknesses, proposing and o...
Data
The attached document here includes paragraphs and figures which were cut from the original version of the article to match the required size by the journal. Since these sections include some important information for our readers, we wish to share them publicly. To cite this document, please follow the following format: Hosseini, S. A. H., & Sa...
Data
How Critically Open-minded Are We? An Australian Perspective Through the World Values Survey Authors’ Complimentary Document Hosseini, S. A. Hamed Saha, Lawrence J. The following paragraphs and figures were cut from the original version of the article to save space. Since these sections include some important information for our readers, we wish...
Conference Paper
Knowledges of the inner nature, deep structures and conflictual dynamism of capitalism potentially constitute a transformative cognitive Commons. Likewise, to achieve an inclusive understanding of the existing post-capitalist praxes and the imaginary visions of utopian futures require cumulative, collective and cooperative learning. Thus, theories...
Conference Paper
In 21st century, “Capital” requires a more comprehensive and applicable definition than merely a social process where money makes more money through production relations. Capital, in its material manifestation, is a socially organized ‘process’, through which surplus value is produced and controlled by 'unsustainable' and 'un-sovereign' ways of exp...
Conference Paper
Populism, as a concept, generally implies a mobilized support for the political, cultural and economic preferences of the populace as opposed to those of the elite, foreigners, intellectuals, media, government, corporations, scientific bodies, ethnic minorities, immigrants/refugees, or any other social group or community whose identity or interest...
Article
Full-text available
Australians are told that they live in one of the top 10 richest countries in the world in terms of GDP per capita, and that they enjoy a level of 'well-being' or 'quality-oflife' higher than many other advanced societies. Australia is ranked third after Norway and Denmark on the OECD Better Life Index, a new index developed to measure nations' wel...
Article
Full-text available
This article introduces ‘critical open-mindedness’ as a new sociological construct, which can be employed particularly in the studies of social attitudes and attitude change, social values, social identities, cross-cultural relations and social discrimination. By drawing on the data collected through the 2005 World Values Survey in Australia, we ha...
Chapter
FULL-TEXT AVAILABLE AT REQUEST >>>>>>>>>>>> ".... The planet’s bio-capacity to sustain the present form of global ‘development’ is nearly exhausted. Much of ‘development’ around the world could be characterized as ‘maldevelopment’, in which long-term negative consequences tend to outweigh short-term positive benefits (Moore, 2015), thus prompting...
Article
Download Full text from: http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/rGE5JAbFa7ufUf9pN6iT/full This article critically reflects on theoretical dilemmas of conceptualizing recent ideological shifts and contention among global transformative movements. Some studies conceptualize these movements as ideologically mature and coherent, while other inquiries highl...
Working Paper
Full-text available
This template is designed by Dr S A Hamed Hosseini to guide his Postgraduate candidates in their confirmation process. However, he is happy to share this publicly. Please consult with your supervisor if you want to adopt the template as the preferences may be different.
Article
We are living in an era of multiple crises, multiple social resistances, and multiple cosmopolitanisms. The post-Cold War context has generated a plethora of movements, but no single unifying ideology or global political program has yet materialized. The historical confrontation between capital and its alternatives, however, continues to pose new p...
Technical Report
This paper profiles a selected range of major cultural and social contexts within the Australian Muslim community, particularly those which may be viewed as having an influence on the political identities of young Australian Muslims. As a ‘selective’ profile, this work sheds light on the possible spheres of engagement for Muslim youth, recognizing...
Chapter
Justice has been conceptualized by many in the global field of resistance as a multi-dimensional, multi-scalar and multi-polar issue. As argued in this article, studying the conception of justice among these movement actors and their conceptualizations of injustice on their own ground can have significant lessons for both normative theories of just...
Chapter
Social action depends on imagination, and the current conjuncture requires an ‘ecological imagination’. But what is its content? The chapter addresses a new conjuncture in 21st century politics - a global contestation over the ecological future between establishment voices from business, governments, and multilateral agencies versus a coalition of...
Research
Full-text available
Hosseini, S. A. (2010), Globalization and Inequality [online]. Available: https://globalalternatives.wordpress.com/2010/04/01/globalization-and-nation-state/, [Accessed on …/…/20…].
Research
Full-text available
Hosseini, S. A. (2010), Globalization, Culture and Identity [online]. Available: http://globalalternatives.wordpress.com/2010/04/01/globalization-and-nation-state/, [Accessed xx/xx/20xx]. Introduction Do we live in a culturally converging world? What are the cultural consequences of globalization? “In terms of Culture, is Globalization an opportun...
Research
Full-text available
HOSSEINI, S. A. 2010. Contested Meanings of Globalization [Online]. Available: http://globalalternatives.wordpress.com/2010/03/19/contested-meanings-of-globalization/ [Accessed on / /20 ] It is now more than two decades that the concept of globalization, despite all controversies and disappointments about its usefulness, resist becoming an old-fas...
Research
Full-text available
Hosseini, S. A. (2010), Globalization and Capitalism [online]. ResearchGate, DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.1883.0241 , [Accessed xx/xx/20xx].
Research
Full-text available
Does globalization undermine the nation-state?
Article
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Drawing on the World Social Forum as an exemplary case study, this article shows how an emerging mode of cosmopolitanist vision (‘transversalism’) can be explained in terms of activists’ experiences of both complexity and contradiction in their networks. The paper questions the idea that the transnationalization of networks of solidarity and interc...
Article
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David Harvey in his short criticism of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in 21 Century, rightfully questions Piketty’s definition of ‘capital’ as one of his central difficulties: “Capital is a process not a thing. It is a process of circulation in which money is used to make more money often, but not exclusively through the exploitation of labor power. Pik...
Article
This article uses the concept of social capital to analyse data about Muslim jobseekers attempting to enter the Australian labour market. They often relied on their own social networks to find work rather than maximize the support of employment service providers. The study demonstrated the range of Muslim jobseekers and their social networks in an...
Conference Paper
In this article, Hosseini reflects on the recent organizational and ideational shifts in the so-called global justice movements. While some recent studies conceptualize these movements as ideologically mature and coherent, other inquiries, highlight growing disorganizations, fragmentations, disappointments, and disputes. The former argue that under...
Conference Paper
Critical analysis of ideological divisions in the broad Global Left, via the historical, ideational and practical roots of these differences is important, for a key reason: it can help us explain the Left’s past and present shortcomings and difficulties in creating viable coherent solutions to the multiple crises of the world capitalist system. Thr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this paper, we have developed a set of criteria in the form of propositions for the operationalization of our transversalist evaluative framework. It is our intention that this framework can help us decode the conceptual settings and capacities of ideologies for being deployed by agents for promoting cross-ideological dialogues, or even "creoliz...
Article
Full-text available
A 'critical' literature review is supposed to 'critically examine' a rather solid literary body of arguments/ideas around a particular topic. The literary body of ideas around the topic (i.e. literature) may include theorizations, conceptualizations, and/or explanations based on empirical studies of the topic. Each body of ideas supports at least o...
Article
The experience of job market disadvantage is not a novel phenomenon for some in contemporary Australia, even in the face of embedded equal employment opportunity (EEO) ideals. This article addresses the phenomenon of persistent job market disadvantage for some minority groups by presenting new data from a major multi-method study on labor market ob...
Article
Full-text available
This article reports the findings of a multi-method study to assess barriers to employment among Muslim jobseekers and the relative effectiveness of employment services designed to support them. In August 2010, the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination noted with concern reports from Australia that highlighted ‘ongoin...
Chapter
Globalised neo-liberalism has produced multiple crises – social, ecological, political. In the past, crises of global order have generated large-scale social transformations, and the current crises likewise hold a transformative promise. Social movements become a crucial barometer, in signalling both the demise and rise of political formations and...
Method
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An education template designed for devising survey research tools for the purpose of studying people’s social closed-mindedness.
Method
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How to Survey Critical Open-mindedness: An exemplary group assessment task for courses on quantitative social research
Article
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Book
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Are the growing oppositions to neoliberal market globalism (especially in the aftermath of global economic meltdown) able to develop meaningful alternative ideologies? Is there any substantial alternative to the world capitalist system on the horizon? How would the ideologies and ideas address the dire dilemmas of economy vs. ecology, redistributio...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past three decades, there has been a rising concern about the ability of social theories to address the idea-construction (ideational) processes in social and political movements. This article argues that in spite of the recent growing emphasis on the cognitive dimension of collective action, many theoretical attempts and the studies influ...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past three decades, there has been a rising concern about the ability of social theories to address the idea-construction (ideational) processes in social and political movements. This article argues that in spite of the recent growing emphasis on the cognitive dimension of collective action, many theoretical attempts and the studies influ...
Method
Full-text available
An analytical model can be developed to analyse the factors that determine job readiness of jobseekers and their labour outcome. Figure 1, illustrates this model by relating the general factors discussed in this review. At the core of this model, there are four interrelated concepts: 1. Job Readiness of Jobseekers (JR) (including human capital) 2....
Article
Full-text available
Four dimensions of global complexity will be delineated and their impacts on the global justice movement will be discussed. These four dimensions are as follows: (1) uneven global interconnection, (2) increasing socio-cultural fragmentations and economic inequalities, (3) the emergence of a post-Cold War multi-axial hierarchical power structure acr...
Preprint
As discussed in this article, in spite of the recent growing emphasis on the cognitive dimension of collective action, many theoretical attempts and the studies influenced by them evidence significant problems in explaining the historical emergence and development of movements’ cognitions. These problems stem from a failure at the metatheoretical l...
Article
Full-text available
This paper attempts to show the emergence of a new ideological trend within the global field of resistance against the corporate-led globalization. This ideological trend, coined here the alter-globalization trend, is ideal-typically constructed in terms of its associated mode of social thought. The newly developed perspectives and cognitive transf...
Conference Paper
This article reviews historical transformations in the mainstream theoretical endeavors to address the ideational/cognitive aspects of social action. The review is a historically contextualized examination of changes in relevant mainstream social theories of ‘ideation’ or ‘cognition’ in terms of their capacity to go beyond the divisions between hum...
Article
Full-text available
اندیشه های اجتماعی و جامعه شناختی دکتر علی شریعتی چه نسبتی با مکاتب جامعه شناختی امروز خصوصن مکتب انتقادی و پسا مدرن دارند. این مقاله منتشر شده به سنه 1379 در دو قسمت سعی در پاسخ گویی به این سوال دارد.
Article
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آنچه موضوع اصلی مقاله حاضر را تشکیل می دهد، بررسی و تأملی اجمالی در سیر تحول و تطور در اندیشه اجتماعی در حوزه نظریه پردازی های توسعه است. صرف نظر از اینکه در دنیای واقعی و در زمینه تجارب متعدد جوامع مختلف در پنجاه سال گذشته، مفهوم و پدیده واحدی به نام توسعه، آنهم مطابق یک الگوی واحد قابل تشخیص هست یا نه، در این مقاله تنها به بررسی قبض و بسط های نظر...
Article
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حسینی، عبدالحامد (۱۳۷۸) » نظريه سرگشتگي – جذب: چالش نظريه و واقعيت در ايران معاصر» ، ماهنامه فرهنگ توسعه سال ۸ ، شماره ۴۲، صص۷۸ – ۸۵ ------------------ در گفتمان متداول توسعه؛ شاهد به کارگیری مفاهیم و تعابیر عاملی چون "کشورهای در حال توسعه" و یا "توسعه نیافتگی" با فرض الگوی واحد و جهان شمول "توسعه" به عنوان یک معیار مسلم بوده ایم. اما تجربه ی تک ت...
Article
Full-text available
حسینی، عبدالحامد (۱۳۷۸) قبض و بسط تئوریک توسعه، ماهنامه فرهنگ توسعه، سال ۸ ، شماره ۴۲، صص ۹۳-۸۶- ------------------------------- آن چه موضوع اصلی مقاله حاضر را تشکیل می دهد بررسی و تاملی اجمالی در سیر تحول و تطور در اندیشه اجتماعی و حوزه نظریه پردازی توسعه می باشد. صرف نظر از این که در دنیای واقعیت ها و تجارب متنوع جوامع مختلف در طی پنجاه سال اخیر...

Questions

Questions (9)
Question
One important thing to bear in mind, as per some bitter experiences, is that some software programs 'slightly' alter the data if the data is fed to them via excel sheets with formulas in them; the solution is just to simply copy and paste the data values only (excluding formulas) before uploading the file. I was puzzled when I saw that an organization (that is not very active) kept coming up with high centrality measures; that made me very confused for a while and suspicious of something going wrong. Only a close look at the differences made me believe it must be the excel sheet formulas; after removing them, it then worked well.
Question
Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) is one of the most useful tools we have to determine the mediators and moderates in the integrated models. However, when (or in fact especially since in many cases) the relationships between a good number of variables are mutual (due to ambiguity in direction), the determination of the two roles (moderation vs mediation) becomes complex. As shown here in this simplified model (see the attached picture)- originally developed out of an SEM analysis, we may be able to overcome the confusion by seeking help from SNA (social network analysis).
 The nodes will surely be the variables and the beta coefficients can be used to adjust the connection weights. The nodes with the highest “betweenness” centrality appear to play a stronger role as "mediators" (having more control over the flow of causality) whereas the ones with higher “eigenvector” centrality can be argued to play a more genuine moderating role (even if their influence is low). Closeness may indicate a greater integration between the two roles in the case of those variables with higher centrality.   Mediation and Moderation are then treated as interrelated continuums rather than categories. The interpretation of the model then can be further advanced through the discussion of the centrality of each variable in playing such roles and thus the most effective ways of intervention can be speculated.
In the current mainstream macro- and even meso- sociology, intervention is a rather meaningless concept and this perhaps rather explains the lack of interest among sociologists in such arguments. However, with the growing intensification of social upheavals and the return of conscientious social sciences to the scene, it would be a misconception to think that the lack of adequate socio-historical agency exercised by social scientists (as social scientists) should reduce our arguments to almost mere descriptions of sad realities depicted in the relationships between social factors and phenomena. In a transformative scholarship, a research project is a political one and thus is meant to influence change by empowering the progressive agents of change and any knowledge about the centrality of the factors that can be transferred to the agents of collective action would serve the purpose.
Question
This piece was written last year and posted on LinkedIn. I am just sharing it here for those interested.
Since I was given the privilege of playing the lead editor role, I felt obliged to share my reflections on the project.
The editorial and authorship teams made great efforts to create a truly interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and ‘pluriversal’ piece of work. Surely there are many areas in need of further betterment in its next editions. I hope the volume will instigate critical reviews/feedback. This is what I am really longing for, as what primarily mattered to me (and the co-editors) was to create a platform for reshaping the field, rather than simply improve my/our metrics; so overcoming my/our pragmatist instinct was not a big deal!
Promoting transformative scholarship is the key feature of the volume which is arguably worth pursuing further through our research projects and teaching programs, especially in these highly troubled times. If interested in what this means, please see the introduction and the first chapters.
The project turned out to be more than creating a conventional handbook. Many chapters contribute to the advancement of their fields in addition to updating their readers about the most recent advancements. Authors were asked to critically engage with the theory/literature, present their critical views while drawing on sensible examples and/or their research findings, and finally discuss the implications for progressive change/forces.
We did not start from a general call for participation. The aim was not to create a loosely assembled collection (like what normally comes out of conferences). We had to start with carefully studying potential contributors before inviting them to make sure that maximum consistency would be secured.
We also aimed to benefit from both established and emerging authors. A very time-consuming process in the beginning but was absolutely worth it: Initially, more than 60 people were invited to submit their proposals after consulting our concept note. We had to go through two more rounds of invitations to finally find the right number of suitable contributors. Having well-known scholars in the editorial team surely made a great difference in this regard, increasing the rate of positive responses and sustained commitments to the end.
Even in this case, there is still a risk that some inputs may diverge from the original goals. To stay committed to the objectives of the project (i.e. the transformative agenda), the editorial team had to work closely with the authors; in some cases, the chapters were tirelessly revised and reviewed many times. We proudly spent our little finances to lessen language barriers, making sure that our great non-English speaking minds would remain included.
Part I chapters revisit the theory and call for profound shifts in our conceptual systems to reflect the recent global transitions.
Among other key features are the handbooks' commitment to giving more space to experiences and insights from the global south, to push for feminization, decoloniality, and radicalization of our scholarships, to publicize progressive alternatives to the current lethal dependency on capital, carbon, consumerism, commodification, compulsive growth, and populist politics.
With the current Thirdworldization of the majorities in the so-called First World going on (under the authoritarian (post)neoliberal economic regime), the global North can learn a lot from the global South!
While the South chronologically follows the North as a role model of economic development, it is ahead of the North in experiencing the repercussions of maldevelopment, mostly due to the lack of effective indigenization of change under truly democratic institutions. With the recent demise of democracy in the North, one can envisage the foreseeable future, simply by reflecting on the Southern experiences. Who could believe the richest country in the world would record the highest pandemic death toll?
It will be unfair not to acknowledge the impact of our classrooms and our bright students in shaping our research outcomes; something that once upon a time we used to do more often in our publications! Maintaining our teaching-research nexus viable plays a decisive role in poromoting the originality of our research outcomes. How we can continue doing this under the current harsh conditions is a great question!
The book’s concept note/proposal that I had the privilege of first drafting it was inspired by my earlier experience of restructuring SOCA2400_Future Societies beyond Capitalist Globalisation. Students’ engagement and reception of the course was significantly improved when greater weight was given to the discussions of progressive alternatives, visions of the future, and transformative initiatives (vis-à-vis the routine radial criticisms of neoliberalism that are now oversaturated in many textbooks). The handbook’s structure replicates the course structure: first foundational arguments, then myth-busting and criticisms of what is sold to masses as reality, and then critically engaging with alternatives/movements as the ultimate future-making forces.
Perhaps making our courses more future-oriented, more imaginative, more radically liberating, more inclusive of underheard voices, and thus more appealing, can be a meaningful way to genuinely optimize them for future change? I suppose we agree that our imminent societies do not need passive occupiers of the so-called future jobs (mostly predicted to be even more precarious in the post-COVID world); rather we will need proactive, creative, and open-minded social transformers? This book is hopefully one step in that direction.
The edited collection has so far received support and endorsements from several leading global scholars in the field, such as Vandana Shiva, Susan George, Manfred B. Steger, Henry Veltmeyer, Brigitte Aulenbacher, and Adam David Morton.
"We live through a violent transformation of economy and society, as billionaires try to turn our bodies and minds into the latest colony to be mined for "data". But this handbook is a guide to shaping a future beyond the violence of colonialism, slavery, and witch hunts. Through its various theoretical lenses, we can begin to imagine a common future rooted in our diversities." -- Vanda Shiva, Ph.D., “One of the most powerful feminists in the globe” (Forbes' 2010); Founder of Research Foundation for Science, Technology, and Ecology in Dehra Dun; Weissberg Chair in Human Rights and Social Justice (2013-14)
"This impressive handbook sheds light on a period of globalization characterized by far-reaching transformations of capitalism and society. It fascinates by bridging the gap between ecology, economy, and politics; profound theoretical approaches help us understand the present interregnum; innovative empirical research and alternative visions let us imagine future ways of life." -- Brigitte Aulenbacher, Head, Theory of Society and Social Analyses, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria
“It’s full of original thinking and new takes on a changing, elastic, often scary world and how we try to understand it." - Susan George, President of the Transnational Institute.
“Erudite and wide-ranging in its topics, this comprehensive volume combines insightful assessments of the deepening global crises of our time with the innovative construction of counter-hegemonic strategies for a variety of emancipatory struggles in both global and local arenas." - Manfred B. Steger, Professor of Sociology, the University of Hawai'i at Manoa and Global Professorial Fellow, Western Sydney University
“…this stunning handbook…will take you on a mind-stretching voyage you do not want to miss. Highly recommended" -- Adam David Morton, Professor in the Department of Political Economy, University of Sydney
The first paragraph of the introduction chapter reflects the timeliness of its publication:
We finalize this introduction in mid-March 2020; a time marked by a global pandemic that is already having devastating consequences for diverse communities across political, social, and economic terrains. Embedded within this are emergent and potentially immense shifts in the current fragile economic and political global order. The new decade will perhaps be remembered as a pivotal moment in which trends towards increasing state and market authoritarianisms and multiple forms of progressive alternatives come head to head. Our hope is that this Handbook can contribute to the latter and to a radical transformative praxis which will enable us to come out of the ashes of breakdown into a new dawn of possibility.
The volume is divided into three parts.
10 chapters in Part I (Theory in Transition) provide new analyses and theories of 21st Century global changes, creating the longer perspective needed to proactively conceptualize historical events as they unfold.
19 chapters in Part II (Transformation in the interregnum) discuss a wide range of socio-economic, socio-political, and socio-ecological challenges the world is facing today. These include the crises of democracy, global governance, inequality, insecurity, precarity, public health, education, displacement, social uprisings, war and violence, ecological catastrophes and climate change.
And finally, 9 chapters in Part III (Alternative futures) discuss progressive responses including ‘alternative modes of livelihood’ and communal solidarity beyond dependence on carbon, capital, commodity, constant growth, and corporate-led politics.
Researchers and students from around the world and across the fields of sociology, politics, anthropology, gender studies, international development, international relations, geography, political economy, ecological studies, and philosophy will find this an invaluable and fresh guide in the 21st century.
The book is featured on the Routledge website at https://www.routledge.com
Question
Here are some thoughts to stimulate the discussion (initially presented in my weblog - Global Alternatives - in 2015)
David Harvey in his short criticism of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in 21 Century, rightfully questions Piketty’s definition of ‘capital’ as one of his central difficulties:
“Capital is a process, not a thing. It is a process of circulation in which money is used to make more money often, but not exclusively through the exploitation of labor power. Piketty defines capital as the stock of all assets held by private individuals, corporations and governments that can be traded in the market no matter whether these assets are being used or not. This includes land, real estate and intellectual property rights as well as my art and jewellery collection. How to determine the value of all of these things is a difficult technical problem that has no agreed-upon solution.”
However, David Harvey’s definition of capital remains very much influenced by its 19th century Marxian understanding of industrial capitalism. In the 21st century, capital deserves a more comprehensive and more representative definition than just a process in which money makes more money through production relations. I, therefore, propose the following definition:
Capital is a ‘social process’, through which ‘value’ is ‘extracted’, ‘reified’, ‘appropriated’, ‘controlled’ and ‘re-utilized’ through ‘socio-ecologically unsustainable’ and ‘politically un-democratic' ways of exploiting human capacities for self-fulfilment (i.e. labor, both manual and intellectual), natural Commons including land, self-sustaining planetary capacities (non-renewable sources of energy and the earth’s bio-capacity including the climate), and communal capacities for living well together (well-living) (from the level of the household to the world community level). The process is thus self-amplifying, invasive, spiral and competitive by nature.
Capital is a social process and not just an economic one since it involves specific sociocultural and political modes of sociability as well as particular modes of livelihood. It is based on exploitation rather than ‘self-sustaining use’ of human and natural resources. Here, ‘exploitation’ is distinguished from ‘use’, since the former makes (1) the resources to lose their capacity to be sustainability reproduced over generations, and (2) the communities to lose their capacity to ‘determine’ the levels and ways of use democratically and autonomously.
Thus, a comprehensive analysis of capital and capitalist systems requires not only the theorization of the exploitation of labor, land, and nature through the processes of production (the first dimension of exploitation) but also of financial speculations, enclosures, and hoardings, that are determined undemocratically through the chaotic interplay between the uncertainty of market mechanisms and the plutocratic influences of financial monopolies or corporate powerhouses. The latter includes what David Harvey calls ‘capital strike’ used by monopolies to cause “artificial scarcity” and thereby increase the “rate of return” or what I would like to call in more general terms, ‘spurious surplus’, which has real impacts on real production processes. Despite acknowledging this fact, Harvey (unlike Piketty) unjustifiably excludes the latter process of producing spurious surplus from his definition of capital!:
"Money, land, real estate, plant, and equipment that are not being used productively are not capital. If the rate of return on the capital that is being used is high then this is because a part of capital is withdrawn from circulation and in effect goes on strike."
The withdrawal of capital from productive circulation is part of (and has become increasingly a significant component of) today’s capital. This is because, according to our new definition of capital, even ‘capital strikes’ are about extracting and controlling surplus (no matter how spurious it is) and it prevents democratic determination and sustainable use of resources associated with the withdrawn capital.
Accordingly, ‘alternatives to capital’, from this point of view, consist of a broad range of approaches from reformist orientations to democratic social regulations of ‘capital’ (like post/Keynesian visions), to antipodal alternatives to the existence of capital (like anti-market, anti-trade initiatives).
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Citation: Hosseini, S. A. H. (2015). “Capital and Its Alternatives: Why capital in the 21st century needs a better definition.” GlobalAlternativesWordpress.com, Retrieved 22 Feb 2015, from https://globalalternatives.wordpress.com/2015/02/22/capital-and-its-alternatives/
Question
In our post-globalist/post-cosmopolitanism era, how useful the concepts of transversality and transversalism are in helping us understand the dynamisms of socio-political and ideological convergences and divergences in the pluriverse of progressive transformative forces and movements?
I am very pleased to see that the notion of Transversal Cosmopolitanism/Transversalism which was initially introduced for the first time to the literature in 2013 through a journal article on the Occupy Movements (and then later extended through several publications single-authored and co-authored with Barry K Gills, James Goodman, and Ariel Salleh) is gaining some attraction to the extent of being used as a new framework for case studies. (see the attachment here or https://globalalternatives.wordpress.com/2021/10/27/transversal-cosmopolitanism-transversalism-in-the-emerging-literature/)
The conversation around the new approach, its strengths, and limitations, is thus worth pursuing through multiple mediums.
For those interested:
Question
Researching DoM is about exploring how a group of people is socially marginalized and what are the main social mechanisms of such a process. In this section, I attempt to develop a preliminary definition of ‘social marginalization’ as a socio-anthropological concept as well as a general research and debate framework that needs to be adapted and contextualized depending on the social context of the study.
Definition:
Social Marginalization happens when a group of people are relatively deprived of having equal and adequate opportunity to determine their relationships autonomously ( in any aspect of social life) with the members of the broader society.
  1. This process is historical, can be inter- and/or intra- group.
  2. Social marginalization has both subjective and objective dimensions.
  3. The mechanisms that facilitate and maintain marginalization are both ideational and material.
  4. Social marginalization is usually legitimized ideologically, culturally, and cognitively. Both the marginalized and mainstream may share the same mentalities that justify such a process.
  5. Social marginalization is usually sustained through policies and laws; underlying these laws are ideological mentalities often justified in the name of science, bureaucracy, efficiency, growth, ethics, patriotism, and religion.
Marginalization is usually associated with the lack of: 1.    representation in decision-making processes 2.    recognition of rights and responsibilities 3.    equal redistribution of resources and services
Studies of social inequality mostly provide us with rather static pictures of society in terms of the distribution of income, wealth, social opportunities. They pay less attention to the dynamics of social inequality
In contrast, studies of social marginalization open up a new angle in understanding how social inequalities and exclusions happen and evolve. These studies are expected to be theoretically integrative, multi-method, and cross-disciplinary regarding the multidimensionality of social marginalization.
(c) S A Hamed Hosseini, 2009
Question
In a linear bivariate status, the coefficient and the slope are not actually divorced, and thus we can NOT claim, with certainty, that the higher r does never mean higher correspondence in change.
It all depends on the SDs (standard deviations) in a linear bivariate regression. In a linear regression when we have only two variables (Y and X), b is simply a factor of r (by the ratio of SDs). This means a 1 SD change in X is associated with a (r. SD) change in Y. Use the regression line equation, change your X by one SDx and you will see Y changes by r times SDy.
So instead of saying that a higher coefficient of determination should never be interpreted to mean that (say) older people are more strongly conservative than younger people (compared to when the coefficient is lower), I would say, “it may not always necessarily mean that …”
If we think about it, it sounds meaningless to say that r squared shows how much variation in Y can be explained by X and then say this is “merely” a sign of tightness of fit to the line, and has nothing to do with the association/prediction of change in them.
The “percentage of variation in Y” for 100 per cent change in X can surely be accurately measured by using b; that would then be (b . (X1/(a+bX1)) * 100%; X1 just any point on the regression line (rather than an observed case).
In the absence of doing regression, r can still give us (though not accurately and not always) an estimation of prediction.
Let’s keep the relation between b (in the above equation) and r in mind; b can be replaced by r times SDy/SDx (standardized or not). So, the higher b, the higher r!
Surely we cannot extract a “certain” and “accurate” prediction of Y by merely using r unless we use the SDs as the units of change. This would of course depend on the ratio of the SDs. When the SD of X is much higher than the SD of Y, this means that the cases are closer to a rather horizontal line (thus a smaller slope with a higher correlation coefficient) preventing us to conclude that the higher age is strongly associated with higher conservatism. But that is only when such a condition is the case.
In an opposite scenario, if the SDx is much smaller than SDy and even if the correlation is small, then the slope goes up sharply, meaning many cases are more scattered vertically than horizontally but let’s say still away from the regression line, and we can, despite having a smaller correlation, see that in a range of ages, the older people are much more conservative (as displayed by the higher slope) even if r is not that high.
As a challenge, let’s think that that in a strange scenario, we are only given the r to teach our students about predictability (and we do not want to bring SDs into conversation). What would be the best bet for predictability?
We can perhaps see if the “ratio of the standard deviations” (as an indicator of tightness) multiplied by X1/(a+bX1) in the above equation would produce a rough estimation of r!? if the answer is kind of positive, this rough estimation of r is being multiplied by r itself would take us somewhere not too remotely far from a prediction [r. (SDy/SDx) . (X1/(a+bX1)] ≈ r . r ≈ r2
S A Hamed Hosseini
Postscript:
For those interested, here is an interesting article on different functions and features of the Correlation Coefficient, partly addressing the interesting relation between r and regression slope; or r as a factor of slope
– a highly tight fitness around a rather horizontal regression line in many cases has both the r and the slope closer to zero.
Surely correlation is widely misused but also has some interesting faculties beyond a simple sense of association or tightness. Surely all alone is far from “confirming” causation but can be indicative of it if other conditions are met; a lot of more sophisticated modeling methods to get as close as possible to a sense of causation are correlation-based etc. So some non-definitive reflections on causality/predictability should be tolerated if especially the reflections on correlation are backed up with some more sophisticated literature.
Question
How far should the Left take the burden of responsibility for the global rise of right wing populism? For what failures should the Left  be kept responsible? For not being political enough? or not being able to produce a universal alternative? for being so fragmented? or not being nationalist enough? for being contaminated with cosmopolitanist optimism or globalist vision? for becoming too committed to social divisions and discrimination? or for nothing at all as the Left has been too weakened to overcome its failures?  (certainly what we just simply call the Left covers a broad range of views from center left to far left but the same thing can be said about the right and that populist right has gained momentum whereas populist left is left behind).

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Project
This is a publication project by Common Alternatives Website. Peer-reviewed academic essays and working papers published by the members and associates of Common Alternatives Network and UON Alternative Futures Research Network will be shared through this RG projct site.
Project
This project is about measuring 'critical (social) open-mindedness' in Australia as a composite index which was first introduced through a series of conference presentations and publications by its chief investigators. It also employs Structural Equation Modelling to explore its determining social factors in th Australian context (2005-2012). In the age of rising anti-immigrant sentiments and populist nationalist movements lead by far right political forces which draw on the politics of fear and hatred across the world, closed-mindedness is a concept that needs to be rethought and returned to the center of our conscientious/critical social inquiry. We however argue that this time, the sociological dimension of this phenomenon deserves a much stronger attention. Therefore, the notion of ‘social close/open-mindedness’ is developed for the first time through this project as a sociological construct and the complexities of its measurement and explanation are discussed and dealt with.
Project
The project investigates progressive alternatives to capital in 21st century which have been developed in in the form of theory, model, practice, policy, and project. It investigates the capacities of these alternatives for cross-ideological interactions and integration. It particularly focuses on four major democratic modes of livelihood and sociality which have influenced transformative social movements in the global field of post-capitalist transitions. Project website: http://thecommonalts.com