Ryutaro Goto

Ryutaro Goto
Kyoto University | Kyodai · Seto Marine Biological Laboratory

PhD

About

51
Publications
7,270
Reads
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590
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2017 - present
Kyoto University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
May 2015 - February 2017
University of Michigan
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2012 - May 2015
The University of Tokyo
Position
  • JSPS Postdoctral Research Fellow

Publications

Publications (51)
Article
Full-text available
Background Galeommatoidea is a superfamily of bivalves that exhibits remarkably diverse lifestyles. Many members of this group live attached to the body surface or inside the burrows of other marine invertebrates, including crustaceans, holothurians, echinoids, cnidarians, sipunculans and echiurans. These symbiotic species exhibit high host specifi...
Article
Echiurans (spoon worms) are derived annelids that have secondarily lost segmentation. Recently, two molecular phylogenetic studies were performed to resolve the interfamily relationship of echiurans. However, the tree topologies were incongruent and taxon sampling was limited in both the studies. Thus, the phylogenetic relationships within echiuran...
Article
Compared to host shifts, the importance of within-host cladogenesis in the diversification of symbionts remains less well understood in marine systems. Yoyo clams (Galeommatidae: Vasconiellinae) are a clade of marine bivalves that live commensally with burrowing mantis shrimp. Almost all yoyo clams byssally-attach to the host burrow wall via a spec...
Article
Many aquatic animals, including mammals, fishes, crustaceans and insects, produce loud sounds underwater 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Soft-bodied worms would seem unlikely to produce a loud snap or pop because such brief, intense sounds normally require extreme movements and sophisticated energy storage and release mechanisms [5]. Surprisingly, we discovered...
Article
The molluscan class Gastropoda includes over 5,000 parasitic species whose evolutionary origins remain poorly understood. Marine snails of the genus Caledoniella (Caledoniellidae) are obligate parasites that live on the abdominal surface of the gonodactylid mantis shrimps. They have highly modified morphological characteristics specialized to the e...
Article
Sipunculans are non-segmented marine worms with an anterior retractable introvert, which are commonly included in Annelida based on molecular phylogenetic and phylogenomic analyses. They generally burrow in the soft sediments or live inside the crevices of hard substrata (e.g. calcareous/coralline rocks). However, members of some sipunculan genera...
Article
Lingulidae are often considered living fossils, because they have shown little morphological change since the Paleozoic. Limited morphological variation has also made the taxonomic study of living lingulids challenging. We investigated species diversity and phylogenetic relationships of extant lingulids and show that they are substantially more div...
Article
Many insect‐pollinated plants use floral scent signals to attract and guide the effective pollinators, and temporal patterns of their floral scent emission may be tuned to respond to the pollinator's activity and pollination status. In the intimate nursery pollination mutualism between monoecious Glochidion trees (Phyllanthaceae) and Epicephala mot...
Article
The montane terrain of northern Laos is covered by species-rich subtropical evergreen oak forests, home to endemic tree genera such as Mytilaria (Hamamelidaceae), and characterised by the coexistence of several honeybee and bumblebee species. We explored community-level plant–pollinator interactions of this unique little-known ecosystem. Extensive...
Article
Ikeda taenioides (Ikeda, 1904) (Annelida: Thalassematidae: Bonelliinae) is the world’s longest spoon worm species, which possesses an extremely long tape-like proboscis with a striped color pattern and a large brownish red trunk. This species is endemic to the Japanese Islands and inhabits a deep vertical burrow in intertidal and subtidal sand flat...
Article
Full-text available
Spirobranchus kraussii (Annelida: Serpulidae) was recognized as being widely distributed both in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. However, the sampling records far from its type locality (South Africa) have been questioned. Actually, recent molecular phylogenetic studies showed that S. kraussii contains genetically distinct species. In this study,...
Article
Full-text available
The family Vitrinellidae is a group of tiny marine snails that generally occur in shallow waters of temperate and tropical seas. The biology of most vitrinellid species remains poorly understood. In this study, we report that Circulus cinguliferus (A. Adams, 1850) (Vitrinellidae), distributed widely in the warm shallow waters of the Pacific, inhabi...
Article
Goodingia is a crinoid-parasitic genus of the gastropod family Eulimidae, consisting of two named members: G. varicosa (Schepman, 1909) (type species) and G. capillastericola (Minichev, 1970). Due to their rarity, these species have been scarcely compared with each other. In this study, we assessed the taxonomic and phylogenetic relationships of Go...
Article
Full-text available
The Polynoidae, commonly known as "scale-worms" due to the scale-like elytra on the dorsal surface, contains many species living in symbioses with other invertebrates. Most of these symbionts are host-specific, but some have a wide range of hosts. The genus Asterophilia includes two species living in shallow subtropical to tropical waters in the Pa...
Article
Full-text available
Burrows produced by marine invertebrates often harbor other small commensal invertebrates. The mud shrimp Upogebia is known to coexist with the myid bivalve Cryptomya in a burrow produced by the shrimp. Both species are filter-feeders, and thus interspecific competition or trophic niche segregation may occur in the burrow. Samples for carbon and ni...
Article
Ikeda taenioides (Ikeda, 1904) (Annelida: Echiura: Ikedidae) is the largest spoon worm in the world and has been recorded only from Japanese coasts. This species was described by Ikeda in 1904 and then collected from various localities in Japan by the middle of the 20th century. However, this species has dramatically decreased in number because of...
Article
Many species of the hermit crab Clibanarius (Diogenidae) live on rocky shores of tropical and warm temperate regions. Some of these species are known to climb out from tidal pools onto rock surfaces exposed to air during low tide. The ecological significance of this behavior, however, remains unclear. We investigated the differences between air-exp...
Article
Echiura (commonly called spoon worms) are derived annelids that have an unsegmented sausage-shaped body with a highly extensible anterior end (i.e. a proboscis). Echiura currently contains two superfamilies: Echiurioidea (with Echiuridae, Urechidae and Thalassematidae) and Bonellioidea (with Bonelliidae, and Ikedidae). Ikedidae contains only Ikeda,...
Article
A new galeommatid bivalve, Montacutona sigalionidcola sp. nov., is described from an intertidal flat in the southern end of the Kii Peninsula, Honshu Island, Japan. Unlike other members of the genus, this species is a commensal with the burrowing scale worm Pelogenia zeylanica (Willey) (Annelida: Sigalionidae) that lives in fine sand sediments. Spe...
Article
Ergaea walshi, a gastropod with a markedly flat shell, often lives inside empty snail shells occupied by hermit crabs. We investigated its lifestyle, shell growth pattern, and habitat preference for host hermit crabs and host snail shells. Four hundred sixteen snail shells, including 363 shells with hermit crabs and 53 empty shells, were collected...
Article
Eight specimens of a threatened goby, Gymnogobius macrognathos (30.04– 38.87 mm in standard length), were collected on a mudflat characterized by abundant burrows of Upogebia major, at Akkeshi, Hokkaido, northern Japan in August 2017. Because G. macrognathos specimens were collected directly from U. major burrows by suction pump, and were also coll...
Article
Evolutionary transitions from free-living to symbiotic lifestyles often lead to dramatic changes in morphological, ecological and physiological characteristics. Galeommatoidea represents a highly diverse superfamily of Bivalvia, with > 620 described species in multiple free-living and symbiotic clades and, thereby, provides a unique opportunity to...
Article
Full-text available
The symbiotic association between hermit crabs and sea anemones is a classic example of mutualism in the sea. Some species of hermit crabs have the ability to transfer the symbiotic anemones onto their new shells when they change shells. The hermit crab Dardanus deformis (H. Milne Edwards, 1836) (Decapoda: Diogenidae) carries some anemones on the d...
Article
Sagamiscintilla thalassemicola (Bivalvia: Galeommatoidea: Galeommatidae sensu lato) is a white-robed commensal clam that lives on the body surface of spoon worms (Annelida: Echiura). This species was described based on specimens collected from the spoon worm Anelassorhynchus mucosus (Thalassematidae) in Amakusa, Kyushu, Japan, in 1962, but there ha...
Article
Inter-familial relationships of the phylum Annelida have been widely studied using molecular phylogenetic/genomic approaches; however, intra-familial relationships remain scarcely investigated in most annelid families. The Maldanidae (bamboo worms) comprise more than 280 species of 40 genera and six subfamilies that occur in various environments fr...
Article
Full-text available
Ikedosoma elegans (Ikeda, 1904) (Annelida: Echiura: Thalassematidae) is a rare, large deep-burrowing spoon worm that has been observed only in Japan. This species was first described based on the specimens collected from Misaki, Sagami Bay (Kanagawa Prefecture), eastern Japan, in 1902. Since the first description, this species has not been collecte...
Article
Full-text available
A new tellinid species, Pharaonella amanyu sp. n., is described from sand banks around Amami Islands, the Ryukyu Archipelago, in southern Japan. A molecular phylogenetic analysis suggests that this new species is closely related to P. sieboldii. This species has long siphons and lives buried deep in well-sorted white sand syntopically with Tonganae...
Chapter
Mutualism is an interaction between species, each of which gains benefits that have costs for the other. Such interactions are ubiquitous in nature and often play important roles in the maintenance of ecosystems and biodiversity. However, theoretical considerations suggest that mutualism is not evolutionarily stable because it is vulnerable to inva...
Article
Casting is one of the most effective methods for investigating the morphology of invertebrate burrows. However, this method is sometimes problematic, especially for studies of gravely sea floor habitats. This is because the cast often traps coarse-grained sediments (pebbles and shell fragments) on its surface, which interferes with investigation of...
Chapter
Echiurans (spoon worms) are marine invertebrates that have a sausage-shaped unsegmented body with an extensible spoon-like proboscis. Most species live inside burrows in soft sediments. They have been classified as a separate phylum, but recent molecular phylogenetic and phylogenomic studies have consistently suggested that they are derived annelid...
Article
Full-text available
The Galeommatoidea is a bivalve superfamily that exhibits high species diversity in shallow waters. Many members of this superfamily are associated commensally with burrowing marine invertebrates in benthic sediments. The genus Borniopsis is known only from eastern Asia and exhibits high host diversity (e.g., mantis shrimps, crabs, holothurians, si...
Article
The bivalve Tellimya fujitaniana (Yokoyama, 1927) (Galeommatoidea, Heterodonta) was described based on a fossil shell. Until now, the biology of living animals has not been reported. In this study, we found T. fujitaniana in a commensal relationship with the heart urchin Echinocardium cordatum (Pennant, 1777) (Spatangoida, Echinoidea) on the intert...
Article
The bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea is characterized by its symbiotic associations with other marine invertebrates. However, for many galeommatoideans, the host species remains unknown. Platomysia (Galeommatoidea) is a monotypic genus including a single species P. rugata, which is distinguished from other galeommatoideans in having distinct and...
Article
Tsunamis associated with the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake seriously disrupted the shallow marine ecosystem along a 2000 km stretch of the Pacific coast of Japan. The effects of the 2011 tsunamis on the soft-bottom benthic community have been relatively well studied in the intertidal zone, whereas tsunami effects on the subtidal b...
Article
Paramya is an enigmatic genus of Myidae (Bivalvia: Heterodonta: Myoidea) that includes three uncommon species: Paramya subovata (Conrad, 1845), Paramya recluzi (A. Adams, 1864) and Paramya africana Cosel, 1995. Paramya subovata is known as a commensal living in the burrow of the spoon worm Thalassema hartmani Fisher, 1947 (Annelida: Echiura: Thalas...
Article
The Galeommatoidea is a bivalve superfamily that exhibits high species diversity in shallow waters. Many members of this superfamily are associated commensally with burrowing marine invertebrates in benthic sediments. The genus Borniopsis is known only from eastern Asia and exhibits high host diversity (e.g., mantis shrimps, crabs, holothurians, si...
Article
Full-text available
Floral scents are among the key signals used by pollinators to navigate to specific flowers. Thus, evolutionary changes in scents should have strong impacts on plant diversification, although scent-mediated plant speciation through pollinator shifts has rarely been demonstrated, despite being likely. To examine if and how scent-mediated plant speci...
Article
Coprinopsis asiaticiphlyctidospora (Basidiomycota, Psathyrellaceae), is a new Coprinoid ammonia fungus from Amami and Okinawa, Japan. In macro- and micro-morphology, this species is similar to C. phlyctidospora and C. austrophlyctidospora, but differs in having smaller basidiospores and spiny basidiospore ornamentation: Phylogenetic analysis with t...
Article
Many members of the bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea have symbiotic associations with other marine benthic invertebrates. Among them, Koreamya arcuata (A. Adams, 1856) is distinctive because it is the only known bivalve symbiotic with brachiopods. Here we describe Koreamya setouchiensis n. sp. as the second example in this genus, based on specime...
Article
Full-text available
Zoophilous flowers often transmit olfactory signals to attract pollinators. In plants with unisexual flowers, such signals are usually similar between the sexes because attraction of the same animal to both male and female flowers is essential for conspecific pollen transfer. Here, we present a remarkable example of sexual dimorphism in floral sign...
Article
Full-text available
The Echiura, or spoon worms, are a group of marine worms, most of which live in burrows in soft sediments. This annelid-like animal group was once considered as a separate phylum because of the absence of segmentation, although recent molecular analyses have placed it within the annelids. In this study, we elucidate the interfamily relationships of...
Article
Species richness and community composition of symbionts associated with the burrowing echiuran worm, Ochetostoma erythrogrammon Leuckart & Rüppell, 1828, were quantitatively surveyed on subtropical intertidal flats in the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan. Overall, we recorded seven species of burrow associates, including at least six obligate commensals....
Article
The Balanophoraceae is a unique angiosperm family that fully parasitizes the roots of trees. Although the pollination systems of several genera in this family have been reported, little is known of their diversity. In the present study, we investigated the pollination biology of Thonningia sanguinea (Balanophoraceae) in the tropical rainforests of...
Article
The burrows created by benthos in tidal flats provide various habitats to other organisms. Echiuran burrows are unique among these in being persistently disturbed by the host's undulating activity, but little is known on how symbionts adapt to such a unique habitat. We report here the morphological and ecological adaptation by two bivalve species o...
Article
Full-text available
Coevolved mutualisms often exhibit high levels of partner specificity. Obligate pollination mutualisms, such as the fig-fig wasp and yucca-yucca moth systems, represent remarkable examples of such highly species-specific associations; however, the evolutionary processes underlying these patterns are poorly understood. The prevailing hypothesis sugg...
Article
Ecology Letters (2010) 13: 321–329 The evolutionary stability of mutualisms is enhanced when partners possess mechanisms to prevent overexploitation by one another. In obligate pollination–seed consumption mutualisms, selective abortion of flowers containing excessive eggs represents one such mechanism, but empirical tests have long been limited to...
Article
*Obligate mutualisms involving actively pollinating seed predators are among the most remarkable insect-plant relationships known, yet almost nothing is known about the chemistry of pollinator attraction in these systems. The extreme species specificity observed in these mutualisms may be maintained by specific chemical compounds through 'private c...
Article
Curvemysella paula is a markedly crescent-shaped bivalve that lives inside snail shells occupied by hermit crabs. Here, we describe the unique symbiotic life, growth pattern, and reproductive biology of this bivalve, based on specimens collected from the shallow, muddy bottom of the Seto Inland Sea, Japan. C. paula was found attached to columellae...

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