Ryan McManamay

Ryan McManamay
Baylor University | BU · Department of Environmental Science

PhD

About

113
Publications
28,296
Reads
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1,515
Citations
Citations since 2017
65 Research Items
1221 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
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Introduction
Ryan McManamay is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Science at Baylor University. Ryan conducts integrative research in Human-Environmental Systems and Urban Dynamics, especially related to water resources. He specializes in Biogeography, Macroecology, Restoration Ecology and Management, and Environmental flows.
Additional affiliations
July 2013 - present
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Position
  • Aquatic Ecologist
July 2013 - August 2016
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Position
  • Aquatic Ecologist, Research Scientist
August 2007 - May 2011
Virginia Tech (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (113)
Article
Hydropower comprises the largest portion of the world's renewable energy portfolio yet induces significant environmental effects in river and floodplain ecosystems. Many countries are seeking to increase hydropower capacity primarily through the construction of new dams; however, this overlooks the potential energy that can be gained from optimizin...
Article
Full-text available
Water, energy, and food are all essential components of human societies. Collectively, their respective resource systems are interconnected in what is called the “nexus”. There is growing consensus that a holistic understanding of the interdependencies and trade-offs between these sectors and other related systems is critical to solving many of the...
Article
Full-text available
Water, energy, and food are all essential components of human societies. Collectively, their respective resource systems are interconnected in what is called the “nexus”. There is growing consensus that a holistic understanding of the interdependencies and trade-offs between these sectors and other related systems is critical to solving many of the...
Article
Full-text available
Flashy hydrology and high solute loads in stormflow are well-studied effects of the built environment on urban streams. The physical and chemical interactions between inflowing stormwater of urban streams and their termination in large impoundments, however, is poorly understood. Determining the spatial distribution of urban stormwater in reservoir...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental flows are critical for balancing societal water needs with that of riverine ecosystems; however, data limitations often hinder the development of predictive relationships between anthropogenic modifications to streamflow regimes and ecological responses – these relationships are the basis for setting regional water policy standards fo...
Article
Cities influence land use change on neighboring and distal areas through sociopolitical or infrastructural connections between urban and non-urban regions, termed teleconnections. While teleconnections are generally recognized as important to land cover dynamics, many land use and land cover change (LULCC) modeling efforts do not explicitly account...
Article
Inland waters serve as important hydrological connections between the terrestrial landscape and oceans but are often overlooked in global carbon (C) budgets and Earth System Models. Terrestrially derived C entering inland waters from the watershed can be transported to oceans but over 83% is either buried in sediments or emitted to the atmosphere b...
Article
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Understanding resource demands and tradeoffs among energy, water, and land socioeconomic sectors requires an explicit consideration of spatial scale. However, incorporation of land dynamics within the energy-water nexus has been limited due inconsistent spatial units of observation from disparate data sources. Herein we describe the development of...
Article
Oil and gas extraction activities occur across the globe, yet species-specific toxicological information on the biological and ecological impacts of exposure to petrochemicals is lacking for the vast majority of marine species. To help prioritize species for recovery, mitigation, and conservation in light of significant toxicological data gaps, a t...
Article
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Drinking water supplies of cities are exposed to potential contamination arising from land use and other anthropogenic activities in local and distal source watersheds. Because water quality sampling surveys are often piecemeal, regionally inconsistent, and incomplete with respect to unregulated contaminants, the United States lacks a detailed comp...
Article
Wind and hydropower are important renewable components of national energy portfolios, but their infrastructure negatively affects biodiversity. Regional development requires identification of scenarios that minimize the cumulative impacts of multiple facilities. We introduce the cumulative impact plot (CIP) to quantify cumulative impacts of renewab...
Article
Full-text available
Reducing global carbon emissions will require large-scale transitions from fossil fuels to renewable energy resources. Hydropower will likely play a role in those transitions as it provides reliable energy storage while counter-balancing intermittent renewables. However, the construction of new dams comes at significant environmental costs to river...
Article
Without a shift to renewable energy sources, climate change will have adverse effects on many terrestrial and aquatic species. On the other hand, replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy will have different effects on wildlife, some negative. To protect biota, while navigating the complexities surrounding the transition to renewable energy, wil...
Article
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We used the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) as a framework to develop an empirical Hg flux model for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC), a Hg-contaminated watershed in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. By integrating long-term Hg monitoring data with simulated flow and suspended solid loads in a site-specific empirical Hg transport model, we (1) quantified...
Article
Addressing climate mitigation while meeting global electrification goals will require major transitions from fossil-fuel dependence to large-scale renewable energy deployment. However, renewables require significant land assets per unit energy and could come at high cost to ecosystems, creating potential conflicts between global climate mitigation...
Article
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As demand for water in the arid southwest increases, pressure is mounting on many aquatic and riparian species that rely on riverine habitat for survival. Some of these riverine areas are managed as private, state, or federal lands with differing levels of mandated protections; however, few efforts have explored the potential of filling gaps in riv...
Preprint
Full-text available
Flashy hydrology and high solute loads in stormflow are well-studied effects of the built environment on urban streams. The physical and chemical interactions between inflowing stormwater of urban streams and their termination in large impoundments, however, is poorly understood. Determining the spatial distribution of urban stormwater in reservoir...
Chapter
Full-text available
In the coming decades, our planet will witness unprecedented urban population growth in both established and emerging communities. The development and maintenance of urban infrastructures are highly energy-intensive. Urban areas are dictated by complex intersections among physical, engineered, and human dimensions that have significant implications...
Article
Full-text available
Accurately measuring water use by the economy is essential for developing reliable models of water resource availability. Indeed, these models rely on retrospective analyses that provide insights into shifting human population demands and adaptions to water shortages. However, accurate, methodologically consistent, empirically authentic, and spatio...
Chapter
Earth's rivers are at risk. Across the globe, rivers have been dammed, diverted, straightened, and polluted. Increasing human population, growing economic productivity, and climate change have caused a drastic increase in altered rivers during the Anthropocene. Rivers provide a host of societal benefits such as energy production, food production, i...
Chapter
River hydrology is the study of the dynamic volumes of water within fluvial channels. Each river has a unique hydrologic signature—an outcome of the complex interactions between climate and the surrounding landscape, the geology and geomorphology, and the longitudinal, lateral, and vertical connections between the aquatic and terrestrial interface....
Article
Scenarios are commonly used to evaluate the environmental implications of future alternative energy pathways - they provide a benchmark for policy-makers to evaluate social, economic or environmental tradeoffs of various policies and their benefits to society. However, scenarios may leave policy-makers incognizant of potential technological hurdles...
Article
Recent decades have produced a river of field data linking hydrologic alteration to fish populations in hundreds of U.S. river systems. Adverse impact thresholds and relationships between flow alteration and fish populations are key for advancing environmental flow conservation and environmental flow regulations in U.S. waterways. Prior work has es...
Article
Full-text available
Worldwide economic losses from extreme weather events (EWE) have increased over recent decades, with significant geographic heterogeneity in damages. The IPCC defines the risk from EWE as a function of the climate hazard, socioeconomic exposure, and vulnerability. Although these three drivers vary at fine spatial scales, spatial variability largely...
Article
Global expansion of hydropower resources has increased in recent years to meet growing energy demands and fill worldwide gaps in electricity supply. However, hydropower induces significant environmental impacts on river ecosystems - impacts that are addressed through environmental impact assessment (EIA) processes. The need for effective EIA proces...
Article
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Human consumption of freshwater is now approaching or surpassing the rate at which water sources are being naturally replenished in many regions, creating water shortage risks for people and ecosystems. Here we assess the impact of human water uses and their connection to water scarcity and ecological damage across the United States, identify prima...
Article
Floodplain integrity can be defined as the ability of a floodplain to support essential geomorphic, hydrologic, and ecological functions that maintain biodiversity and ecosystem services. Humans alter floodplain functionality by changing the physical landscape of the floodplain or by altering river flow regimes and subsequent floodplain inundation...
Article
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The datasets described herein provide the foundation for a decision support prototype (DSP) toolkit aimed at assisting stakeholders in determining evidence of which aspects of river ecosystems have been impacted by hydropower. The DSP toolkit and its application are presented and described in the article “Evidence-based indicator approach to guide...
Article
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This study uses a high-resolution, process-based modeling framework to assess the impacts of changing climate on water resources for the Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa River Basin in the southeastern United States. A 33-member ensemble of hydrologic projections was generated using 3 distributed hydrologic models (Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System, Var...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Present a hybrid biogeographic and environmentally constrained clustering approach to classify ~853,000 stream reaches in the eastern United States. Examine the frequency of stream typologies in the landscape relative to anthropogenic stressors to identify potential stream conservation needs. Location Eastern United States. Methods Fish commu...
Article
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Global alterations of the hydrologic cycle by humans have led to alarming rates of water shortages and irreversible ecosystem change. Our ability to manage water resources lies in accurately modeling water availability at scales meaningful to management. Although hydrologic models have been used to understand the implications of future climate and...
Article
Hydropower generation has advantages for societies that seek low-carbon, renewable energy alternatives, but sustainable hydropower production will require an explicit consideration of potential tradeoffs between socioeconomic and environmental priorities. These tradeoffs are often explored during a formal environmental impact assessment process tha...
Article
Short streamflow records make it difficult to determine the extent to which discharge changes in excess of ecological thresholds are due to dam operations or natural variability. Unnecessary changes to reservoir operating rules can reduce off-stream benefits whereas no changes to rules when thresholds are exceeded can degrade downstream riverine ec...
Article
Cities drive the majority of global human resource consumption and serve as hubs of major infrastructural networks. To offset their resource demands, cities derive goods and resources from regions well outside urban boundaries inducing stress and impacts on distal ecosystems. As cities grow, these stressors are likely to increase, depending on choi...
Article
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View this article here: https://rdcu.be/bw1EB ABSTRACT: Cities are powerful political and economic entities, and for many cities cultivating renewable energy penetration is sound economic policy. Many power plants in the United States will need to be replaced in the coming decades, so opportunities for renewable energy development are imminent. Alt...
Article
• Hydropower literature review produced database of over 3000 environmental metrics. • Metrics varied by project location, life cycle stage, size and literature type. • Emergent properties of the metrics can help stakeholders evaluate sustainability. • Measurable, repeatable & understandable metrics will improve licensing efficiency.
Article
• Mercury (Hg) is a widespread environmental pollutant anthropogenically released into aquatic ecosystems where it is tightly retained and cycled through abiotic and biotic processes. Understanding the transport and fate of Hg, including the role of organisms in these cycles, is important. However, few studies, if any, have evaluated the role of ma...
Article
Full-text available
Stream classifications are important for understanding stream ecosystem diversity while also serving as tools for aquatic conservation and management. With current rates of land and riverscape modification within the United States (US), a comprehensive inventory and evaluation of naturally occurring stream habitats is needed, as this provides a phy...
Article
Movement within stream corridors is a basic life history requirement of many aquatic organisms. Barrier removal in streams has become a common practice in the United States aimed to restore organism dispersal and meet conservation objectives; however, there are social and economic costs to the removal of barriers. Accordingly, tools to prioritize b...
Article
Full-text available
The energy-water nexus, or the dependence of energy on water and water on energy, continues to receive attention as impacts on both energy and water supply and demand from growing populations and climate-related stresses are evaluated for future infrastructure planning. Changes in water and energy demand are related to changes in regional temperatu...
Article
Modeling the interactions of water and energy systems is important to the enforcement of infrastructure security and system sustainability. To this end, recent technological advancement has allowed the production of large volumes of data associated with functioning of these sectors. We are beginning to see that statistical and machine learning tech...
Article
Ecohydrology combines empiricism, data analytics, and the integration of models to characterize linkages between ecological and hydrological processes. A challenge for practitioners is determining which models best generalizes heterogeneity in hydrological behavior, including water fluxes across spatial and temporal scales, integrating environmenta...
Article
Full-text available
Describing the physical habitat diversity of stream types is important for understanding stream ecosystem complexity, but also prioritizing management of stream ecosystems, especially those that are rare. We developed a stream classification system of six physical habitat layers (size, gradient, hydrology, temperature, valley confinement, and subst...
Data
Observation data representation. Representativeness of the subset of streams containing empirical observations of hydrology, temperature, and substrate on the overall variation represented by all streams in the region. (PDF)
Data
Simple and complex stream typologies. List of simple (substrate excluded) and complex (all habitat layers) stream typologies found in the analysis and total length occupied in streams in the eastern US. Stream typologies for all uncertainty scenarios and their length are also provided. (XLSX)
Data
Roanoke River case study sites. Stream reaches in the Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain and Southeastern Plains scored according to their similarity to the Lower Roanoke River. (PDF)
Data
Predictor variables and model performance. Spatial variables, their sources, and whether they were used to model hydrologic classes, temperature classes, substrate size or bankfull width. Results of random forest models are provided including performance, variable importance, and the confusion matrix (hydrologic classes). (XLSX)
Data
Drainage-area vs. flow relationships. Relationships between drainage area and mean annual flow stratified by different climate zones and hydrologic regions for the Eastern US. (PDF)
Data
Methods for quantifying typology uncertainty. Approach and results of examining the effect of uncertainty of mapping classes to stream reaches on stream typologies and rarity estimates. (PDF)
Data
Drainage-area thresholds supporting size classes. Breaks or threshold values found in the literature for stream size classifications based on upstream drainage area. (TIF)
Data
Walker Branch case study sites. Stream reaches in the Ridge and Valley Ecoregion scored according to their similarity to Walker Branch. (PDF)
Data
Stream typology examples. Examples of the 30 most dominant and 30 rarest simplified stream typologies in the eastern US (does not include substrate classes). Codes for classes are provided in Table 1. All typologies for both simple and complex approaches are provided in SI. (PDF)
Data
Disturbance patterns and uncertainty in typologies. Comparison of disturbance patterns between the original simple typology and typology scenarios arising from class uncertainty. The % physical diversity is calculated relative to the number of typologies with lengths > 1km whereas the % stream length is calculated relative to the total length of al...
Article
The paper presents a multivariate measure useful for integrated environmental assessments. It is a weighted distance measure applied to metric data but based on nonparametric statistical procedures. The proposed measure allows all environmental indicators to be used directly without any reduction in dimension (e.g. as in principal component analysi...
Article
The reference condition paradigm has served as the standard for assessing the outcomes of restoration projects, particularly their success in meeting project objectives. One limitation of relying solely on the reference condition in designing and monitoring restoration projects is that reference conditions do not necessarily elucidate impairments t...
Article
Open-access databases provide unprecedented access to records of species occurrence, but their utility depends on how complete species inventories are at given surveying resolutions and how uniformly distributed surveys are in space and time. Our aims were to assess (1) the completeness of freshwater fish surveys across spatial scales and among hab...
Article
Full-text available
Significance We introduce a unique and detailed data-driven approach that links cities’ hard infrastructures to their distal ecological impacts on streams. Although US cities concentrate most of the nation’s population, wealth, and consumption in roughly 5% of the land area, we find that city infrastructures influence habitats for over 60% of North...
Article
Full-text available
Animals can be important in modulating ecosystem-level nutrient cycling, although their importance varies greatly among species and ecosystems. Nutrient cycling rates of individual animals represent valuable data for testing the predictions of important frameworks such as the Metabolic Theory of Ecology (MTE) and ecological stoichiometry (ES). They...
Chapter
As urban areas continue to grow and evolve in a world of increasing environmental awareness, the need for detailed information regarding residential energy consumption patterns has become increasingly important. Though current modeling efforts mark significant progress in the effort to better understand the spatial distribution of energy consumptio...
Article
Full-text available
The bar for justifying the use of vertebrate animals for study is being increasingly raised, thus requiring increased rigor for species selection and study design. Although we have power analyses to provide quantitative backing for the numbers of organisms used, quantitative backing for selection of study species is not frequently employed. This ca...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Hydropower is an established, affordable renewable energy generation technology supplying nearly 18% of electricity consumed globally. A hydropower facility interacts continuously with the surrounding water resource environment, causing alterations of varying magnitude to the natural flow of water, energy, fish, sediment, and recreation upstream an...
Article
Full-text available
The global recognition of the importance of natural flow regimes to sustain the ecological integrity of river systems has led to increased societal pressure on the hydropower industry to change plant operations to improve downstream aquatic ecosystems. However, a complete reinstatement of natural flow regimes is often unrealistic when balancing wat...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental flows represent a legal mechanism to balance existing and future water uses and sustain non-use values. Here, we identify current challenges, provide examples where they are important, and suggest research advances that would benefit environmental flow science. Specifically, environmental flow science would benefit by (1) developing a...
Article
Quantitative flow-ecology relationships are needed to evaluate how water withdrawals for unconventional natural gas development may impact aquatic ecosystems. Addressing this need, we studied current patterns of hydrologic alteration in the Marcellus Shale region and related the estimated flow alteration to fish community measures. We then used the...
Article
Full-text available
Primary biodiversity data constitute observations of particular species at given points in time and space. Open-access electronic databases provide unprecedented access to these data, but their usefulness in characterizing species distributions and patterns in biodiversity depend on how complete species inventories are at a given survey location an...
Data
Figure S1. Spatial and environmental variables summarized at the resolution of 0.1° by 0.1° grid cells (N = 83,545) used in coverage analysis.
Data
Figure S2.1. Distribution of occurrence records along a latitudinal spatial gradient. Figure S2.2. Distribution of occurrence records along a longitudinal spatial gradient. Figure S2.3. Distribution of occurrence records along a gradient of elevation. Figure S2.4. Distribution of occurrence records along a gradient of mean annual temperature. F...