Ryan S. Hampton

Ryan S. Hampton
University of Wisconsin–Madison | UW · Department of Psychology

Doctor of Psychology
Post-doctoral Trainee, Niedenthal Emotions Lab, University of Wisconsin-Madison

About

19
Publications
8,607
Reads
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140
Citations
Citations since 2017
16 Research Items
133 Citations
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Additional affiliations
August 2021 - present
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Working in the lab of Paula Niedenthal on the NIH sponsored T32 Training Grant in Emotion Research as a post-doctoral trainee.
October 2019 - April 2020
Peking University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
August 2014 - May 2019
Arizona State University
Field of study
  • Social Psychology
August 2012 - May 2014
Wake Forest University
Field of study
  • Psychology
August 2007 - May 2011
Furman University
Field of study
  • Psychology/Asian Studies Double

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Human cultures are not static. An emerging body of research has documented cultural changes in a wide variety of behaviors, psychological tendencies, and cultural products. Increasingly, this field has also begun to test hypotheses regarding the causes of these changes and to create forecasts for future patterns of change. Yet to date, the question...
Article
This handbook is currently in development, with individual articles publishing online in advance of print publication. At this time, we cannot add information about unpublished articles in this handbook, however the table of contents will continue to grow as additional articles pass through the review process and are added to the site. Please note...
Article
Full-text available
Romantic love involves an evaluative process in which couples weigh similarities and differences that facilitates pair bonding. We investigated neural attentive processes (P3) during evaluative relationship feedback within existing romantic couples using the Relationship Match Game. This paradigm included participant driven expectations about relat...
Article
Full-text available
Empathy has been a key focus of social, developmental, and affective neuroscience for some time. However, research using neural measures to study empathy in response to social victimization is sparse, particularly for young children. In the present study, 58 children’s (White, non-Hispanic; five to nine years old) mu suppression was measured using...
Article
Full-text available
In the present research, we assessed the effects of culture on the ability to regulate affective neural responses. Using an event-related potential design focusing on the centroparietal late positive potential (LPP), we found that cultural groups differed in their ability to intentionally regulate these responses. As a group, European Americans dem...
Article
Full-text available
In the original publication, there were several content and grammatical errors in Table 1. The corrected table is given below.
Chapter
Full-text available
This pre-print may not exactly replicate the final version published in the handbook. It is not the copy of record. Abstract Human cultures are not static. An emerging body of research has documented cultural changes in a wide variety of behaviors, psychological tendencies, and cultural products. Increasingly, this field has also begun to test hypo...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we review and advocate for a cultural neuroscience approach to studying culture and emotion regulation. First, we summarize theoretical accounts regarding how culture influences the way people experience and prefer to regulate their internal experiences and outward expression of emotions. Next, we briefly summarize physiological and...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human cultures are not static. An emerging body of research has documented cultural changes in a wide variety of behaviors, psychological tendencies, and cultural products. Increasingly, this field has also begun to test hypothesis regarding the causes of these changes and to create forecasts for future patterns of change. Yet to date, the question...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, we review an emerging body of research that has used neuroscientific techniques (EEG, ERP, fMRI) to examine how our socioeconomic status (SES) affects brain functioning. We focus on SES effects on neural responses reflecting (1) attunement to others, (2) vigilance, (3) trait inference, and (4) emotion regulation. We also address re...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter provides an overview of cultural neuroscience research on how our brains represent others and the self in a similar fashion. The extent of this self-other overlap appears to be linked to cultural factors. We highlight research that documents cultural influences on self-other overlap in neural representation in terms of abstract self-sc...
Article
Full-text available
Psychologists have long debated whether self-enhancement is universal or varies across cultures. Extant studies using explicit and implicit measures have provided mixed results. In this study (N = 93; 35 European American, 58 Chinese: 28 tested in English, 30 tested in Mandarin), we measured self-enhancement covertly using an ERP paradigm. Self-enh...
Chapter
The existing interfaces between network science and personality research are reviewed, and the other ways in which these two vibrant areas could interact in the future are examined. First, a summary of extant attempts to relate various aspects of personality to brain network characteristics is provided. Contemporary accounts of personality and thei...
Article
Full-text available
The present study (N = 55) used an ERP paradigm to investigate whether cultures differ in the ability to up-regulate affective responses. Using stimuli selected from the IAPS, we found that European-Americans (N = 29) enhanced central-parietal LPP (400-800 ms post-stimulus) responses to affective stimuli when instructed to do so, whereas East Asian...
Article
Full-text available
The present study tested whether socioeconomic status (SES) was linked to differences in the strength of neural empathic responses. Following previous research we measured fronto-central P2 responses to images of neutral faces and faces expressing pain. As predicted we found that higher SES was linked to diminished neural empathic responses. Intere...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
In this line of research my colleagues and I seek to understand how SES affects neural processes involved in a variety of social cognitive and affective phenomena.