Ruth Preser

Ruth Preser
Tel-Hai Academic College | telhai · Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

PhD

About

19
Publications
5,531
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
34
Citations
Introduction
A gender studies scholar by training and a narratologist by passion, my interdisciplinary scholarship combines cultural and feminist critic and empirically informed inquiry. I study forms of citizenship, the public sphere and politics of belonging in the context of kinship, migration, diasporic cultures and urban environments. In my publications I discuss the performative dimension of giving an account of oneself and the production of minoritarian publics; the emergence of diasporic communities in the European Cosmopolis ; activism and feminist pedagogy; and feminist publics. My current research on women without status in the city of Haifa is part of a broader project of 'Isha L'Isha Haifa Feminist Center', where I'm an active member and a co-founder of the Haifa Feminist Institute (HFI).
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - present
Tel-Hai Academic College
Position
  • Lecturer
September 2014 - August 2016
ICI Kulturlabor Berlin
Position
  • Affiliated Fellow
August 2013 - July 2014
ICI Kulturlabor Berlin
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
October 2006 - May 2012
Bar Ilan University
Field of study

Publications

Publications (19)
Research
Full-text available
Bare Lives: Women without Status in Haifa and Northern Israel is a research report based on a study conducted between November 2018 and June 2019 as part of a project on women without status at Isha L’Isha – Haifa Feminist Center. The study focused on three groups of women who do not have access to permanent status or residency in Israel.
Research
Full-text available
דו"ח מחקר זה מבוסס על מחקר שנערך בתקופה שבין נובמבר 2018 ויוני 2019 ,כחלק מפרויקט נשים חסרות מעמד אזרחי בישראל ב'אשה לאשה – מרכז פמיניסטי חיפה'. המחקר נועד ללמוד את המשמעויות של היעדר מעמד עבור נשים משלוש קבוצות שפגשנו במסגרת פעילות הפרויקט והארגון בחיפה וצפון הארץ: פלסטיניות תושבות הגדה המערבית ועזה הנשואות לפלסטינים בעלי תושבות קבע או אזרחות ישרא...
Article
Full-text available
מתוך: לכסיקון סוציולוגי לעת קורונה, 2021. בעריכת אורי רם, שלמה סבירסקי וניצה ברקוביץ . מרכז אדוה וסוציולוגיה ישראלית https://adva.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/lexicon-corona.pdf
Article
Full-text available
עניינו של חיבור זה הוא ביאור המושג אלימות אינטימית בהקשרו העכשווי, כאשר נדמה כי אלימות אינטימית זוכה להכרה ממסדית וחברתית, הן בהקצאת תקציבים, תוכניות, וכוח אדם, והן באיסוף נתונים הניתנים לכימות על ידי ארגוני חברה אזרחית, גופי מחקר ורשויות מדינה. על רקע זה נשאלת השאלה כיצד למרות הנכחתה מתפוגגת אותה הכרה לחלוטין בקרב קובעי מדיניות, התובעים מכולם להיש...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores lesbian intimacy and the conditions for being public. It traces the performative effects of coupledom and argues that intimacy is understood, performed and experienced against the backdrop and in response to prevailing discourses of tolerance which regulate the public sphere. Employing Wendy Brown’s discussion of liberal toleran...
Article
Full-text available
Feminist investment in penetrating the public sphere has been paradigmatic to feminist politics. This paper addresses feminist scripts of being public and being in public by looking at one of the most divisive debates in Israeli feminism, namely the occupation of Palestine. The analysis presented here is an initial attempt, based on sporadic case s...
Chapter
Full-text available
In Borderlands/La Frontera, Gloria Anzaldúa recounted a discussion on homophobia held between members of faculty and students of an American college.1 Citing a straight Caucasian student who understood the term ‘homophobia’ as ‘the fear of going home’,2 Anzaldúa, a Chicana, lesbian, and feminist scholar, embraced the student’s misconception, which...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
In response to a call for interview partners for an ethnography on the Israeli- Jewish lesbian diaspora in Berlin, my prospective partners contacted me, offering their migration stories while apologetically stating that they were no longer, or not exactly, lesbians. Admittedly, such transformations should not come as a surprise. Scholarship on quee...
Article
Full-text available
This article discusses lesbian relationships dissolutions and the stories about them. Applying a narrative approach, the critical reading of breakup stories which are conceptualized as dramas by their participants seeks to problematize the distinction between private and public, respectable and scandalous, normative and deviant, and constructive an...
Article
Full-text available
Transformational learning is a process resulting in deep and significant change in habitual patterns of identity, thought, emotion, and action, enabling new approaches to role enactment. This article explores how moving from a framework of dilemmas, which require solutions and one-sided choices, to a framework of paradoxes that embraces tensions an...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the methodological implications of working with damage: damaged relationality, injured belonging, impaired narratives, and vulnerable identities. The conceptualization of damage as a methodology was the outcome of a narrative investigation into queer relationships’ dissolution. The study explored the way in which lesbians narrat...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
Married women who choose to live as lesbians in Israel are expected to perform a transition. In a culture that maintains a system of binaries by classifying heterosexuality as opposite to lesbianism, lesbian women are expected to 'cross' discursive borders, to abandon heterosexual identity, desire and kinship and to emerge as 'natural' or coherent...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
‘Belonging Travels’ is a book project, which explores Israeli diaspora and contemporary questions of belonging. The proposed research project examines the intersection of race, gender, and migration by turning to one ethnographic site—the Jewish-Israeli community in Berlin. Berlin is often described as a cosmopolitan and diverse environment that is open to the world, and appears regularly in Israeli and German media as a site of longing for emancipation from the continuous national conflict and for a relief from the impossibly high cost of living in Israel. Sometimes, it is articulated as a diasporic longing for a long-lost Europeanness or as a longing for a cultural homeland. While the establishment of the Jewish state defines Jewish immigration as a return from the diaspora, a movement from persecution to safety, the migration to Berlin and its representation in popular debates underscore a multitude of movements and (be)longings. ‘Belonging Travels’ proposes a critical examination of migration, movement, and homeland as categories that cannot be reduced to a geopolitical entity. Exploring the everyday of migration of Israelis in Berlin, the project addresses questions of diversity, multiculturalism, and the production of identity along affective and temporal processes. It explores how Jewish-Israeli identity is reframed and articulated ‘outside’ the national time-space. Concerned with contested heritages and longings, ‘Belonging Travels’ explores narratives of identification and alienation, conviviality and tensions produced in relation to the ‘new’ and ‘old’ Zion(s). The first phase, which laid the empirical and theoretical foundation of the project, has been completed. It explored the emergence of queerness as a privileged ‘class’ in Berlin and the production of Jewish identity, and addressed the question of cultural heritage and appropriation by performing a contemporary diasporic and queer reading of a canonical text—the biblical narrative of Ruth the Moabite. This phase resulted in two publications (‘Things I Learned from the Book of Ruth: Diasporic Reading of Queer Conversions’. In: De/Constituting Wholes: Towards Partiality Without Parts. Manuele Gragnolati and Christoph F.E. Holzhey (Editors). Cultural lnquiry (Series), Vienna: Turia + Kant; ‘Lost and Found in Berlin: Identity, Ontology and the Emergence of Queer Zion’. Gender, Place & Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography, doi: 10.1080/0966369X.2016.1249347). The second phase contains two aspects of Jewish-Israeli lives in Berlin: a) Negotiating attachment and rupture in relation to both Israel and the European space during the eruption of violence and military campaigns. Here I intend to study social media debates and exchanges. This aspect continues my discussion on identity, initially explored in the first phase. While the first phase addressed the emergence of queerness and Jewishness, this phase turns to the production of Israeli and European identities and affiliations. b) The spatial and corporeal dimension of diversity. Here I intend to study the act of walking in the city against the backdrop of Holocaust commemoration sites and projects. In particular, I intend to focus on the act of stumbling upon the Stolpersteine (the memory stones carved on pavements near buildings where Jews used to reside prior to their expulsion). Here I continue the discussion addressed in the first phase on cultural memory as a lived experience, and how the appropriation of canonical texts (or stones) serves to re-articulate contemporary questions of identity and belonging.