Ruth Kiew

Ruth Kiew
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM) | frim · Forest Biodiversity Division

About

154
Publications
61,815
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,675
Citations
Citations since 2016
65 Research Items
960 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150

Publications

Publications (154)
Article
Full-text available
Begonia is the world's fastest-growing genus and a focus of intense taxonomic research. To support this, a stable and useful sectional classification is needed. This paper reviews the feasibility and challenges of creating an infrageneric classification for Begonia based on phylogenetic data, and how to overcome phylogenetic and taxonomic conflict....
Article
Pseuderanthemum lilacinum Stapf is known from a single specimen collected in 1909 from Batu Caves, a karst limestone hill in Selangor, Peninsular Malaysia. Ridley had drawn attention to similarities between it and P. teijsmanni (C.B.Clarke) Stapf, which grows in lowland forest in Peninsular Malaysia. Examination of a range of specimens shows this c...
Article
Full-text available
In Peninsular Malaysia, Coleus is represented by five species. Two, C. hairulii Kiew and C. rafidahiae Kiew, are new species. Both are narrowly endemic and restricted to limestone hills as is C. kunstleri (Prain) A.J.Paton. All three are Critically Endangered. Coleus scutellarioides (L.) Benth., although widespread, is probably not indigenous. It i...
Book
Malaysia Red List: Plant of Peninsular Malaysia, Vol. 1 listed 1,353 taxa from 90 families, 308 genera comprising 1293 indigenous taxa and 60 non-indigenous taxa from Peninsular Malaysia. This publication consists of two parts; Part I contains the introduction, summary and analysis of the conservation status of all assessed taxa, recommendations an...
Article
Full-text available
Batu Caves hill is typical of karst hills in Peninsular Malaysia due to its small size and high biodiversity. It harbours 366 vascular plant species that represent about 25% of the Peninsula’s limestone flora. Five species are endemic to Batu Caves and 23 are threatened species. This high biodiversity is the result of many microhabitats, each with...
Article
Full-text available
The Klang Gates Quartz Ridge (KGQR) is proposed for protection as National Heritage and as a UN-ESCO World Heritage Site because of its spectacular size, exceptional beauty and significant biodiversity. The checklist of vascular plants documents 314 species that comprise a unique combination that grows on lowland quartz and that is distinct from th...
Book
Full-text available
This book is written in the hope that it may help visitors gain a deeper appreciation of the Batu Caves, and all the intrinsic values it holds. Ultimately the wish is that this deeper appreciation will translate into the kind of actions needed to conserve and sustainably manage the Batu Caves and subsequently, other karst towers throughout Peninsul...
Article
Full-text available
New Guinea is the world’s largest tropical island and has fascinated naturalists for centuries. Home to some of the best-preserved ecosystems on the planet and to intact ecological gradients—from mangroves to tropical alpine grasslands—that are unmatched in the Asia-Pacific region, it is a globally recognized centre of biological and cultural diver...
Article
Full-text available
The species of Jasminum Tourn. ex L. (Oleaceae) in Peninsular Malaysia are revised. Eighteen species are recognised, of which eight are endemic. Five of these species have been recorded from Singapore. A key to species is provided, all names are typified, and all species are described. Conservation assessments are given for all species in Peninsula...
Article
Full-text available
Premise: Unique among vascular plants, some species of Selaginella have single giant chloroplasts in their epidermal or upper mesophyll cells (monoplastidy, M), varying in structure between species. Structural variants include several forms of bizonoplast with unique dimorphic ultrastructure. Better understanding of these structural variants, thei...
Article
Full-text available
Southeast Asia (Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Timor Leste, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea) is a region of high plant diversity with an estimated 50,000 flowering plant species. Estimates of plant diversity in the region continue to grow as large numbers of new species are descri...
Article
Full-text available
Four phytogeographical provinces have been recognised in Peninsular Malaysia — the Northern Province, the Perak Province, the Continental Intrusion and the Riau Pocket. The Riau Pocket, originally spelt Riouw, was restricted to SE Johor, Singapore, Banka, Riau Islands, SE Sumatra and NW Borneo but later was expanded to cover the entire east coast o...
Article
Full-text available
Of the 92 Codonoboea species that occur in Peninsular Malaysia, 20 are recorded from the state of Terengganu, of which 9 are endemic to Terengganu including three new species, C. norakhirrudiniana Kiew, C. rheophytica Kiew and C. sallehuddiniana C.L.Lim, that are here described and illustrated. A key and checklist to all the Terengganu species are...
Article
The author of the naturally occuring hybrid Nepenthes x hookeriana is usually given as “Lindl.” (Lindley in Gard. Chron. 1848: 87. 5 Feb 1848), less commonly as “H. Low” (Low, Sarawak: 68. 29 Dec 1847–14 Jan 1848), but sometimes as “Hort. Veitch ex Mast.” (e.g., https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nepenthes_%C3%97_hookeriana) or as “(Lindl.) Macfarl.” (K...
Article
Full-text available
The genus Senyumia was previously known from a single species, S.minutiflora (Ridl.) Kiew, A.Weber & B.L.Burtt, from a limestone karst, Gunung Senyum, in Pahang, Malaysia. Senyumiagranitica Kiew, here described and illustrated, is the second species of the genus. It differs from S.minutiflora , not only in its habitat, but also in its shorter leave...
Article
Six species of Begonia are recorded from Gunung Penrissen in Padawan District, Sarawak, Malaysia including two new species (Begonia minutitepala and Begonia dasycaulis in Sect. Petermannia) and one new subspecies (Begonia natunaensis subsp. sarawakensis in Sect. Jackia). Detailed illustrated descriptions of the new taxa are provided together with a...
Article
An account of the twenty Begonia species from the Gunung Mulu and Gunung Buda National Parks is presented with illustrated descriptions of five new species (Begonia argentii, B. jokwaniana, B. lansatensis, B. muluensis and B. vulgarioides) and one new record (Begonia chlorocarpa Irmsch. ex Sands). A key for their identification is provided.
Article
Begonia is a pan-tropical, mega-diverse genus of economic value as ornamental and medicinal plants. As the fifth largest genus in the angiosperms, Begonia has a huge diversity with over 1,900 known species, which are mainly distributed in the tropical regions of Asia, America and Africa. The size and distribution of the genus gives it the potential...
Article
Full-text available
Begoniayenyeniae is a new species of horticultural value known only from the Endau Rompin National Park, Peninsular Malaysia. It is similar to Begoniarajah with which it had previously been confused in the number of tepals and leaf characters. The new species is compared with three similar species, B.foxworthyi, B.rajah and B.reginula and photograp...
Data
List of taxa with accession and location information for the 48 samples of Begonia included in the Bayesian analysis using ndhF-rpl32 intergenic spacer sequences
Article
The need to exploit limestone products for national development impacts on the conservation of rare and endangered limestone species. To minimise this impact it is necessary to identify which of the 570 limestone outcrops have high conservation importance and whether they have narrowly endemic and/or endangered limestone species. In the absence of...
Article
Full-text available
Vaticanajibiana Ummul-Nazrah (Dipterocarpaceae), from the Relai Forest Reserve, Gua Musang, Kelantan and Gua Tanggang, Merapoh, Pahang, is described and illustrated. This species is Endangered and known from small populations restricted to two isolated karst limestone hills. The type locality, Relai Forest Reserve limestone, is currently under thre...
Article
Full-text available
The pantropical genus Begonia is the sixth-largest genus of flowering plants, including 1870 species. The sections of Begonia are used frequently as analogues to genera in other families but, despite their taxonomic utility, few of the current sections have been examined in the light of molecular phylogenetic analyses. We present herein the largest...
Article
Full-text available
Two new species, Phlegmariurusiminii Kiew (Lycopodiaceae) from limestone karst and P.monticola Kiew from montane habitats, are described from Peninsular Malaysia and a new combination is made for Phlegmariuruspinifolius (Trevis.) Kiew. Phlegmariurusiminii , known from a single hill threatened by quarrying, is Critically Endangered; while P.monticol...
Article
Full-text available
A new species of Asplenium is described from two collections made on limestone hills in Peninsular Malaysia. Conspicuous by its extremely narrow pinnae, it is probably allied to A. salignum but differs in sufficient characters (scale size, size and shape of lamina, venation and sorus length, position and orientation) to be a species in its own righ...
Article
Full-text available
Bukit Nanas Forest Reserve, the oldest forest reserve in Malaysia established in 1900, lies in the center of Kuala Lumpur, the capital city. Over time it has been reduced from 17.5 ha to 9.37 ha but still retains important biodiversity. Its lowland equatorial rain forest has never been logged and tall emergent species to 35 m tall and 124 cm diamet...
Article
Two new species from the Peninsular Region of Thailand, Jasminum peninsulare Kiew from Ranong, Phangnga, and Pattani Provinces and J. ranongense Kiew from Ranong Province, are described and illustrated. Previously, they had both been confused with J. kedahense (King & Gamble) Ridl. from Malaysia and included under this name in the Flora of Thailand...
Article
Full-text available
Six new species of Begonia, Begonia armykapii S.Julia & C.Y.Ling, Begonia baikoides S.Julia & C.Y.Ling, Begonia papulifolia S.Julia & C.Y.Ling, Begonia rubrobracteolata S.Julia & C.Y.Ling, Begonia tinjanii S.Julia and Begonia triangularis Kiew & C.Y.Ling, are described from the forest areas in central part of Sarawak. All species belong to the sect...
Article
Nine Begonia species are recorded from the Batang Ai National Park and the forest area adjacent to the Park. Of these, six species are described here as new (Begonia acidulenta, Begonia bayae, Begonia compacta, Begonia edgariana, Begonia jenginensis and Begonia tebiang). All species belong to section Petermannia. A key to the new species and three...
Article
KIEW, R. 2015. Chionanthus (Oleaceae) in Sulawesi, Indonesia, including three new species. Reinwardtia 14(2): 287 - 295. - The genus Chionanthus (Oleaceae) in Sulawesi is revised. Nine species are described of which C. kostermansii Kiew, C. sordidus Kiew and C. sulawesicus Kiew are new species. Four species are endemic, C. celebicus Koord., C. sord...
Article
Field surveys for the 'Forest Trees of Southern Thailand' project resulted in two new Chionanthus species, C. gardneriorum Kiew from Trang Province and C. pyriformis Kiew from Phangnga and Ranong Provinces. The new species are described and illustrated and a key to Chionanthus species in southern Thailand is provided.
Article
Full-text available
Under natural conditions, wind is the most effective mode of dispersal and this is illustrated by the spread of the tropical American weed, Chromolaena odorata (Compositae). In the older literature this species was called pokok German (German weed) because it was first noticed during World War I or ‘Siam weed’ because it first appeared in the north...
Poster
Monophyllaea R.Br. is one of the most interesting and peculiar genera of Gesneriaceae (the African violet family) because it bears only a single large leaf. In Peninsular Malaysia, six species and two varieties of Monophyllaea are reported of which five are locally endemic and restricted to limestone. Three are narrow endemics distributed to one to...
Article
Eleven new species of Begonia (Begonia alabensis, B. bintang, B. bosuangiana, B. crockerensis B. doloisii, B. flammea, B. inobongensis, B. kinahimiae, B. kipandiensis, B. rambutan and B. tomaniensis) are described from the Crocker Range, Sabah. Nine species belong to sect. Petermannia and one, B. doloisii, belongs to sect. Baryandra while the secti...
Article
Bothriospermum zeylanicum (J.Jacq.) Druce (Boraginaceae), a species native to Asia, has recently become naturalised in Cameron Highlands, Pahang, Malaysia. A description of the genus and species together with colour photographs are provided. It is the only representative of Boraginaceae sensu stricto (i.e. subfam. Boraginoideae) in Peninsular Malay...
Article
Full-text available
A total of 126 species are currently named and described from Borneo (Brunei - 16 species, Kalimantan – 5 species, Sabah – 41 species and Sarawak – 72 species). However, based on our survey of the begonia collection in the Sarawak Herbarium, the un-named taxa (about 110 species) significantly outnumber the 72-named species. The situation is probabl...
Article
Full-text available
The vascular plant flora of Batu Caves, a tower karst limestone formation, includes 269 species; 51 species (19%) are Peninsular Malaysian endemics and 80 species (30%) are calciphiles of which 56 (21%) are obligate calciphiles and 26 species are obligate calciphiles endemic to Peninsular Malaysia. Four taxa are endemic to Batu Caves itself. That B...
Article
Full-text available
Gunung Kanthan, an isolated tower karst, was identified in 1991 as one of the four most important karsts in Perak for conservation. Currently the southern part is under threat from quarrying. The plant checklist records 223 species representing about 34% of mosses and 16.2% of vascular plants that grow on limestone in Peninsular Malaysia. Of these,...
Article
Full-text available
LIM, C. L. & KIEW, R. 2014. Codonoboea (Gesneriaceae) Sections in Peninsular Malaysia. Reinwardtia 14(1): 13 – 17. — Codonoboea is the largest genus of Gesneriaceae in Peninsular Malaysia with 92 species. Nine sections, Boeopsis, Codonoboea, Didymanthus, Glossadenia, Heteroboea, Pectinati, Reptantes, Salicini and Venusti, have been erected based on...
Data
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
Three new species, Gymnostachyum kanthanense Kiew (Acanthaceae), Meiogyne kanthanensis Ummul-Nazrah & J.P.C. Tan (Annonaceae) and Vatica kanthanensis Saw (Dipterocarpaceae), from Gunung Kanthan, Perak, are described and illustrated. All three are Critically Endangered CR B2ab (iii, iv), D1 being known from very small, restricted populations at the...
Article
Full-text available
The picturesque limestone karsts across the Sino-Vietnamese border are renowned biodiversity hotspot, distinguished for extremely high endemism of calciphilous plants restricted to caves and cave-like microhabitats that have functioned as biological refugia on the otherwise harsh habitats. To understand evolutionary mechanisms underlying the splend...