Ruth Blizard

Ruth Blizard
University of Colorado Boulder | CUB

PhD, psychology

About

18
Publications
17,208
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270
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Introduction
Ruth A. Blizard, PhD, is a psychologist practicing in Binghamton, NY with 35+ yrs experience treating persons with severe trauma, dissociation, and personality disorders. BA, University of Colorado, Boulder; PhD, Alliant University, Fresno. Published articles integrate psychoanalytic and attachment theories in treatment of trauma, dissociation and psychosis. Taught the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation course, “Diagnosis and Treatment of Dissociative Disorders.” Is on the editorial board of the Journal of Trauma and Dissociation and is past editor of the newsletters of the ISSTD and Division 56 of the APA, Trauma Psychology News. Currently working on a guide to trauma and dissociation not discussed in the DSM 5 definitions of disorders.

Publications

Publications (18)
Chapter
The essence of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) has been something of a conundrum. This chapter addresses the relationship of BPD to psychosis of emotional or functional origin. Borderline personality may be best understood as a chronic relational trauma disorder, ensuing from contradictory, double‐binding, caregiving relationships. Reality te...
Article
Many symptoms and behaviors associated with a range of psychiatric disorders, including those not designated as trauma- or stressor-related, result from unprocessed and unintegrated traumatic experiences, requiring therapeutic assessments and interventions that consider the complex dynamics brought on by trauma. While the focus on symptoms in the D...
Article
Full-text available
Reviews the book, Schema therapy for borderline personality disorder by Arnoud Arntz and Hannie van Genderen and translated by Jolijn Drost (see record 2009-07369-000 ). It is remarkable that psychotherapists from widely divergent theoretical perspectives report very similar conceptualizations of complex phenomena such as borderline personality dis...
Chapter
The effects of relational trauma on reality-testingCaregiver pathology, double binds, disorganized attachment and dissociated self-statesTreating the effects of dissociative, psychotic or sociopathic caregivers on reality-testingConclusion: Borderline psychotic traits stemming from relational trauma require relational treatmentReferences
Article
Full-text available
Disorganized (D) attachment, and the double-bind characteristics of the relationships that foster it, form a basis for theoretical approaches to understanding the development of alternating, dissociated self states with incompatible, idealizing/devaluing or victim/persecutor models of attachment, such as are observed in borderline personality and d...
Article
Full-text available
A theory describing the development of alternating, dissociated, victim/masochistic and perpetrator/sadistic ego states in persons who grew up with abusive primary caretakers is proposed, and a paradigm for treatment is derived from the theory. Alternating ego states can be observed throughout the spectrum of dissociative disorders, from Borderline...
Article
Full-text available
Abuser alters present a dilemma in the treatment of adults with dissociative identity disorder, because they often undermine the therapy as well as re-abuse the patient. They are paradoxical because they were created to help the child survive abuse, but continue to do so by abusing the self. They were often modeled after an abusive primary caretake...
Article
Full-text available
When a child is utterly dependent for survival on a parent or caregiver who is abusive, the child faces an extraordinary dilemma in finding a way to preserve the attachment to the caregiver while trying to survive terrifying abuse. Concepts from object relations and attachment theories are integrated with current thinking about trauma and dissociat...
Article
A theory describing the development of alternating, dissociated, victim/masochistic and perpetrator/sadistic ego states in persons who grew up with abusive primary caretakers will be proposed and a paradigm for treatment will be derived from the theory. Alternating ego states can be observed throughout the spectrum of dissociative disorders, from B...
Article
Full-text available
Abuser alters present a dilemma in the treatment of adults with dissociative identity disorder, because they often undermine the therapy as well as re-abuse the patient. They are paradoxical because they were created to help the child survive abuse, but continue to do so by abusing the self. They were often modeled after an abusive primary caretake...
Article
Full-text available
Integrates concepts from object-relations and attachment theories with current knowledge of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dissociation to understand abuse survivors' attachment to the abuser. Patterns of attachment in the abuse survivor's relationships and the defenses used to preserve the self and the object are examined. The need to wo...
Article
Includes abstract. Microfiche. s Thesis (Ph. D.)--California School of Professional Psychology, Fresno, 1980. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 68-70).

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