Rutger Wilschut

Rutger Wilschut
Wageningen University & Research | WUR · Department of Nematology

PhD

About

40
Publications
16,428
Reads
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864
Citations
Introduction
I obtained my PhD at the Terrestrial Ecology Department of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology, for which I studied how climate change-driven range-expanding plant species interact with soil organisms in their new and original range. Currently I am working as a Postdoc at Wageningen University. I am particularly interested in the drivers of plant-soil feedback variation and global change impacts on plant-soil interactions.
Additional affiliations
November 2013 - August 2018
Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW)
Position
  • PhD
Education
February 2011 - August 2013
August 2007 - February 2011

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Full-text available
Soil nematodes are key components of soil food web and, through their metabolic activities, play a crucial role in soil carbon (C) cycling. Aboveground and belowground plant C inputs can directly, or indirectly via soil microbes, modify nematode abundance and community composition. Aboveground and belowground C inputs differ in chemical composition...
Article
Full-text available
Droughts affect plant communities, but their impacts may be mediated by soil biota. Soil communities may ameliorate drought stress, and droughts may leave legacies of altered soil communities that may affect future plant growth. However, it is not yet understood which groups of soil biota in particular affect plant performance under drought, nor wh...
Article
Full-text available
Aims Numerous organisms show range expansions in response to current climate change. Differences in expansion rates, such as between plants and soil biota, may lead to altered interactions in the new compared to the original range. While plant-soil interactions influence plant performance and stress tolerance, the roles of specific soil organisms d...
Article
Full-text available
Aims Drought events can alter the composition of plant and soil communities, and are becoming increasingly common and severe due to climate change. However, how droughts affect plant-soil feedbacks is still poorly understood. Plants accumulate species-specific rhizosphere communities, and droughts may have varying impacts across plant species and s...
Article
Plant–soil feedback (PSF) and diversity–productivity relationships are important research fields to study drivers and consequences of changes in plant biodiversity. While studies suggest that positive plant diversity–productivity relationships can be explained by variation in PSF in diverse plant communities, key questions on their temporal relatio...
Article
Nematodes form an important part of soil biodiversity as the most abundant and functionally diverse animals affecting plant performance. Most studies on plant–nematode interactions are focused on agriculture, while plant–nematode interactions in nature are less known. Here we highlight that nematodes can contribute to vegetation dynamics through di...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change causes species range expansions to higher latitudes and altitudes. It is expected that, due to differences in dispersal abilities between plants and soil biota, range-expanding plant species will become associated with a partly new belowground community in their expanded range. Theory on biological invasions predicts that outside the...
Article
Full-text available
Plant species that expand their range in response to current climate change will encounter soil communities that may hinder, allow, or even facilitate plant performance. It has been shown repeatedly for plant species originating from other continents that these plants are less hampered by soil communities from the new than from the original range....
Article
Full-text available
As the most abundant animals on earth, nematodes are a dominant component of the soil community. They play critical roles in regulating biogeochemical cycles and vegetation dynamics within and across landscapes and are an indicator of soil biological activity. Here, we present a comprehensive global dataset of soil nematode abundance and functional...
Article
Full-text available
Soil organisms are a crucial part of the terrestrial biosphere. Despite their importance for ecosystem functioning, few quantitative, spatially explicit models of the active belowground community currently exist. In particular, nematodes are the most abundant animals on Earth, filling all trophic levels in the soil food web. Here we use 6,759 geore...
Article
Full-text available
Current climate change has led to latitudinal and altitudinal range expansions of numerous species. During such range expansions, plant species are expected to experience changes in interactions with other organisms, especially with belowground biota that have a limited dispersal capacity. Nematodes form a key component of the belowground food web...
Article
Full-text available
Plant-soil feedbacks contribute to vegetation dynamics by species-specific interactions between plants and soil biota. Variation in plant-soil feedbacks can be predicted by root traits, successional position, and plant nativeness. However, it is unknown whether closely related plant species develop more similar plant-soil feedbacks than more distan...
Article
Full-text available
Plant range expansion is occurring at a rapid pace, largely in response to human-induced climate warming. Although the movement of plants along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients is well-documented, effects on belowground microbial communities remain largely unknown. Furthermore, for range expansion, not all plant species are equal: in a new ran...
Article
Full-text available
Main conclusion LAESI-MSI, an innovative high-throughput technique holds a unique potential for untargeted detection, profiling and spatial localization of metabolites from intact plant samples without need for extraction or extensive sample preparation. Our understanding of chemical diversity in biological samples has greatly improved through rece...
Article
Full-text available
Many plant species expand their range to higher latitudes in response to climate change. However, it is poorly understood how biotic interactions in the new range differ from interactions in the original range. Here, in a mesocosm experiment, we analyze nematode community responses in original and new range soils to plant communities with either (a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Our understanding of chemical diversity in biological samples has greatly improved through recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS). MS-based-imaging (MSI) techniques have further enhanced this by providing spatial information on the distribution of metabolites and their relative abundance. This study aims to employ laser-assisted electrospray ion...
Article
Full-text available
Much of the immense present day biological diversity of Neotropical rainforests originated from the Miocene onwards, a period of geological and ecological upheaval in South America. We assess the impact of the Andean orogeny, drainage of Lake Pebas and closure of the Panama isthmus on two clades of tropical trees (Cremastosperma, ca 31 spp.; and Mo...
Article
Global warming is enabling many plant species to expand their range to higher latitudes and altitudes, where they may suffer less from natural aboveground and belowground enemies. Reduced control by natural enemies can enable climate warming-induced range expanders to get an advantage in competition with natives and become disproportionally abundan...
Article
Full-text available
An increasing number of studies report plant range expansions to higher latitudes and altitudes in response to global warming. However, consequences for interactions with other species in the novel ranges are poorly understood. Here, we examine how range-expanding plant species interact with root-feeding nematodes from the new range. Root-feeding n...
Article
Although climate warming is expected to make habitat beyond species’ current cold range edge suitable for future colonization, this new habitat may present an array of biotic or abiotic conditions not experienced within the current range. Species’ ability to shift their range with climate change may therefore depend on how populations evolve in res...
Working Paper
Full-text available
This preprint has been reviewed and recommended by Peer Community In Evolutionary Biology (http://dx.doi.org/10.24072/pci.evolbiol.100033). Much of the immense present day biological diversity of Neotropical rainforests originated from the Miocene onwards, a period of geological and ecological upheaval in South America. We assess the impact of the...
Article
Climate change enables range expansions of plants, animals and microbes to higher altitudes and latitudes. Plants may benefit from range expansion when they escape from natural enemies. However, range expansion becomes a disadvantage when plants become disconnected from organisms that control enemies in the new range. Here, we examined nematode con...
Article
Full-text available
There has been a decrease in the ability of biologists to identify their material correctly, particularly plants of complicated genera with common agamospermy, where old clonal entities are accorded the rank of species (microspecies). Agamospermous microspecies are taxonomic entities recognizable from one another by a set of minute morphological fe...
Article
Full-text available
Epigenetic variation has been proposed to contribute to the success of asexual plants, either as a contributor to phenotypic plasticity or by enabling transient adaptation via selection on transgenerationally stable, but reversible, epialleles. While recent studies in experimental plant populations have shown the potential for epigenetic mechanisms...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
This project aims at increasing understanding of the taxonomic and functional importance of soil biodiversity as a whole. This includes both agricultural and natural systems, and an integration of different groups of soil organisms such as bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists, nematodes, microarthropods, earthworms etc. Methodology, inventories etc are all part of this wide project.
Project
The interest in soil and rhizosphere microbiomes is increasing that have led to significant advances in our knowledge particularly on bacteria and fungi. Work on microbiome predators is lagging behind, partly as methods commonly performed in microbial ecology have not been implemented in studying other groups of soil biodiversity, particularly animals. Nematodes are among those most abundant, but we still lack knowledge on their community composition at various spatial levels in soils. The goal of this project and group is to share knowledge and thereby enhance visibility of nematodes in soils