Russell K Schutt

Russell K Schutt
University of Massachusetts Boston | UMB · Department of Sociology

PhD

About

131
Publications
23,028
Reads
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3,809
Citations
Additional affiliations
June 2016 - December 2016
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Position
  • Research Associate
January 2012 - present
Edith Nourse Rogers Veterans Administration Medical Center
Position
  • Co-Investigator
January 2004 - present
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
September 1977 - August 1979
Yale University
Field of study
  • Sociology
September 1968 - August 1977
University of Illinois at Chicago
Field of study
  • Sociology

Publications

Publications (131)
Article
Full-text available
Background Schizophrenia and related disorders are highly disabling and create substantial burdens for families, communities, and health care systems. Although pharmacological treatments can often lessen the psychotic symptoms that are a hallmark of schizophrenia, they do not lessen the social and cognitive deficits that create the greatest impedim...
Article
10567 Background: Asian Americans are the fastest-growing immigrant group in the U.S. As the oldest immigrant group on average, they are at heightened risk for cancer and other diseases. This study explored whether the risk is mitigated by the healthy immigrant effect (HIE), an epidemiological phenomenon that has been well documented among Latino i...
Article
Full-text available
We combined survey, mobility, and infections data in greater Boston, MA to simulate the effects of racial disparities in the inclination to become vaccinated on continued infection rates and the attainment of herd immunity. The simulation projected marked inequities, with communities of color experiencing infection rates 3 times higher than predomi...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The behavioral model of health service use identified health needs, service preferences (predispositions), and service availability (enabling factors) as important predictors, but research has not conceptualized consistently each type of influence nor identified their separate effects on use of substance abuse and mental health service...
Preprint
Full-text available
We combined survey, mobility, and infections data in greater Boston, MA to simulate the effects of racial disparities in the inclination to become vaccinated on continued infection rates and the attainment of herd immunity. The simulation projected marked inequities, with communities of color experiencing infection rates 3 times higher than predomi...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In the Summer of 2020, the Boston Area Research Initiative (BARI) at Northeastern University, the Center for Survey Research (CSR) at University of Massachusetts Boston, and the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) conducted a survey that captures the experiences of 1626 Bostonians during the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic. We conducted a...
Article
Objectives: The purpose of this study was to (Aim 1) describe United States military veterans’ experiences and attitudes about project-based housing (PBH) and tenant-based housing (TBH), including perceptions of their new environment, self‐sufficiency, and social integration. We identified (Aim 2) features of program design and housing facilities a...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This sixth report in a series describes how the pandemic has affected the physical and the mental health of Boston’s residents. By examining how these impacts were distributed by race and ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and family composition, we reveal a range of inequities in how different populations have experienced increased health challenges...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This fifth report in a series describes Boston respondents’ intentions to get the COVID-19 vaccine, when available. In a mail and web-based survey conducted in the September 2020, we asked if respondents plan to get vaccinated—definitely, probably, probably not, or definitely not. In this report, we explore personal characteristics associated with...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Read our fourth report, Living in Boston During COVID-19: Lifestyle, Ideology, Context Drive Attitudes, which provides a precise understanding of the factors that are driving attitudes toward and knowledge about the pandemic, infection risk, and social distancing guidelines. The insights in the report provide Bostonians and policymakers an understa...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Our third report, Living in Boston During COVID: Economic Impact, which describes how the pandemic has affected the employment trajectories and economic resources of Boston’s residents. Also, see our data stories on: - Widespread but Variable (https://cssh.northeastern.edu/bari/economic-pain-widespread-but-variable/); - Inequities Reinforced (css...
Article
Full-text available
In sociology’s formative period between 1830 and 1930, evolutionary analysis organized much theorizing and research. This line of work ended abruptly in the 1920s but, over the last decades, has come back into the discipline somewhat piecemeal with the reintroduction of more sophisticated stage models of societal evolution, functional analysis, hum...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Read our second report, Living in Boston During COVID: Fear and Ambivalence, which describes the attitudes and behaviors that might create vulnerabilities for spreading infection in different communities. Also, see our data stories on: - Attitudes toward Risk & Guidelines: Signs of Ambivalence (cssh.northeastern.edu/bari/attitudes-toward-risk-and-g...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In the Summer of 2020, the Boston Area Research Initiative (BARI) at Northeastern University, the Center for Survey Research (CSR) at University of Massachusetts Boston, and the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) conducted a survey that captures the experiences of 1626 Bostonians during the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, including: thei...
Article
Full-text available
Background Youth in communities with high rates of crime and low rates of collective efficacy are at risk of depression, substance abuse, and other types of delinquency. Objective This article presents a formative evaluation of an empowerment-oriented program intended to reduce depression and risky behaviors by improving social support, providing...
Chapter
Full-text available
Five sociological lessons on disasters
Article
Full-text available
Background: Cancer control programs have added patient navigation to improve effectiveness in underserved populations, but research has yielded mixed results about their impact on patient satisfaction. This study focuses on three related research questions in a U.S. state cancer screening program before and after a redesign that added patient navi...
Article
Full-text available
The New Evolutionary Sociology offers a comprehensive review of the history of evolutionary analysis in sociology that demonstrates its present value ‘once old biases and prejudices are mitigated and, eventually, eliminated’ (p. 14). In the book’s first part, the authors highlight the prominence of evolution in the theorizing of sociology’s founder...
Article
Objectives: This study tested the impacts of peer specialists on housing stability, substance abuse, and mental health status for previously homeless Veterans with cooccurring mental health issues and substance abuse. Methods: Veterans living in the US Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Administration Supported Housing (HUD-VASH) program wer...
Chapter
This chapter reviews the history and philosophy of quantitative methods and provides an overview of the major goals and strategies by which quantitative methods can be distinguished. Specific quantitative research methods can be classified by the primary goal they are designed to achieve and by the general strategy they employ. A positivist perspec...
Article
Full-text available
Despite long-standing prejudices against doing so, it is time for sociology to reconnect with its roots in biological and evolutionary thinking. Sociology emerged as a discipline when the notion of evolution was actively used in biology, geology, and emerging social sciences. Throughout the nineteenth century, many of the most prominent early Europ...
Article
Background: Understanding consumer service preferences is important for recovery-oriented care. Aims: To test the influence of perceived service needs on importance attached to treatment for alcohol, drug, mental health, and physical health problems and identify the influence of service needs and preferences on service use. Methods: Formerly homele...
Article
Objective: Peer specialists are individuals with behavioral disorders who complete training to use their experiences to help others with similar disorders. Recent analyses have suggested that greater engagement with peer specialist services is associated with fewer psychiatric symptoms. This study assessed predictors of engagement with peer specia...
Article
Evidence in support of the healthy immigrant effect (HIE) has been mixed and explanations for it divergent. Research on the HIE is reviewed and seven explanatory hypotheses are presented. Support for these hypotheses is evaluated with data collected in a phone survey of patients in a Massachusetts public health program for economically disadvantage...
Article
Full-text available
Although peer specialists play an increasing role in mental health service delivery, little is known about the best program structures for maximizing effective service delivery. This study reports on qualitative data from a larger study on peer specialists working with veterans in a Veterans Affairs homelessness program who were dually diagnosed wi...
Article
Full-text available
Objective:: Peer specialists are individuals with mental illness and substance use disorders trained to use their experiences to help others with similar disorders. Evidence for the effectiveness of peer specialist services has been mixed in previous randomized trials using intent-to-treat analyses, possibly because of variation in the intensity o...
Article
Full-text available
Differences in health care satisfaction can alter patterns of health care utilization and so affect health outcomes, but little is known about variation in satisfaction in relation to immigration status. Health care satisfaction is analyzed with survey data from state public health program patients. Overall health care satisfaction is higher for fi...
Article
Public health policy goals of engaging underserved communities and countries more effectively, with a diverse workforce, challenge adherence to a traditional health-care delivery model. Mixed methods were used to compare patient navigators and case managers after reorganising a traditional public health programme in a US state to improve services w...
Article
Objective: This pilot project was designed to develop procedures for and test the feasibility of implementing Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) in a group home environment, with a goal of maximizing treatment efficacy by augmenting social engagement in group CET sessions with ongoing social interaction. Methods: Six participants who met criter...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Patterns and predictors of engagement in peer support services were examined among 50 previously homeless veterans with co-occurring mental health conditions and substance use histories receiving services from the Veterans Health Administration supported housing program. Method: Veteran peer specialists were trained to deliver sessio...
Chapter
PurposeReexamination and reinterpretation of the process of deinstitutionalization of public mental hospital inpatients. Methodology/approachA comprehensive review of related research is presented and lessons learned for the sociology of mental health are identified. FindingsThe processes of both institutionalization and deinstitutionalization were...
Book
https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/understanding-the-social-world/book245939
Book
http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674728974
Book
https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/investigating-the-social-world/book242232
Article
Prior research indicates that probation programs that include efforts to change cognitive orientations and social patterns can enhance their effectiveness. This article reports an evaluation of an enhanced probation program, Changing Lives Through Literature, which uses a form of bibliotherapy to increase its rehabilitative effect. Controlling for...
Chapter
History and PhilosophyGoals and StrategiesSpecific Quantitative Methods Conclusions References
Article
Although probation is the most common correctional disposition in the United States, research indicates that standard probation has little to no effect on recidivism rates. However, a growing body of evidence indicates that enhanced probation programs can reduce the likelihood of additional criminal offending. This paper examines a bibliotherapy pr...
Article
Innovative projects to reduce disparities in cancer treatment and research include partnerships between academic and community cancer centers, patient navigation programs and strategies to promote community awareness, education and engagement. A 4 h training program about cancer clinical trials was developed through a needs assessment and in collab...
Article
The purpose of this study was to examine correlates of case managers' satisfaction with their work, services, and service network and to identify connections to service performance and service costs. A decentralized public health program that exemplifies the trend toward more diverse clients and networked services. A mixed method design with 34 cas...
Article
Ethnic differences in participation in cancer clinical trials slow advances in medical knowledge that can reduce health care disparities. Community health workers (CHWs) are an increasingly important bridge between the health care system and underserved communities and could play an important role in increasing rates of clinical trial participation...
Article
Previous research on housing loss among severely mentally ill persons who have been placed in housing after being homeless has been largely atheoretical and has yielded inconsistent results. We develop a theory of housing loss based on identifying fundamental causes-problems in motives, means and social situation-and test these influences in a long...
Article
We evaluate the influence of housing, services, and individual characteristics on housing loss among formerly homeless mentally ill persons who participated in a five-site (4-city) study in the U.S. Housing and service availability were manipulated within randomized experimental designs and substance abuse and other covariates were measured with a...
Article
Personal empowerment is a guiding philosophy of many mental health service programs, but there has been little empirical research on the empowerment process in these programs. The authors examine social processes and consumer orientations within a self-help drop-in center for individuals with psychiatric disabilities, using intensive interviews and...
Article
Job retention is an important psychosocial rehabilitation goal, but one that is not often achieved. We investigate facilitators of and barriers to employment retention among homeless individuals with psychiatric and substance abuse diagnoses who were re-interviewed eight or more years after participating in a traditional vocational rehabilitation p...
Article
Full-text available
Effective translation of research results into programmatic change continues to be the exception to the norm, in spite of increasing recognition to the importance of translational efforts and innovative approaches to the translation proc-ess. We focus attention in this article on a participatory expert panel approach that can improve translation of...
Article
Satisfaction is a critical outcome for the healthcare system and an important influence on subsequent interactions with that system, yet findings have been inconsistent. This paper examined satisfaction as a multidimensional construct and focused on the interrelated influences of ethnicity and language, the potential confounding effects of economic...
Article
Full-text available
To test the influence of neurocognitive functioning on community functioning among formerly homeless persons with serious mental illness and to determine whether that influence varies with social context, independent of individual characteristics. In metropolitan Boston, 112 persons in Department of Mental Health shelters were administered a neurop...
Article
The purpose of this conceptual model of nursing and health policy-based study was to identify the frequency and correlates of activities performed by nurse case managers. Massachusetts Women's Health Network (WHN) contracting organization sites for breast and cervical cancer and cardiovascular disease risk screening. Twenty nurse case managers were...
Article
To test the effect of living in group housing rather than independent apartments on executive functioning, verbal memory and sustained attention among formerly homeless persons with serious mental illness and to determine whether substance abuse modifies this effect. In metropolitan Boston, 112 persons in Department of Mental Health shelters were r...
Article
The social environment of service programs—the context for treatment delivery rather than the treatment itself—is often neglected in evaluations of treatment outcomes. This research paper uses Moos's [Moos, R. H. (1997). Evaluating treatment environments: The quality of psychiatric and substance abuse programs (2nd ed.). New Brunswick, NJ: Transact...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research indicates that most homeless persons with mental illness prefer independent living, while most clinicians recommend group housing. This study compared residential preferences of 141 homeless veterans with dual diagnoses with those of 62 homeless nonveterans with dual diagnoses. Clinicians rated both groups while they were in trans...
Article
Research into vocational rehabilitation (VR) consumer service preferences has been limited. The current study describes the self-reported goals of 228 applicants to a VR program sponsored by the Veterans Administration (VA) and documents the relationship of those goals to participant background variables and outcomes. Participants endorsed a wide v...
Article
Full-text available
Research has identified misleading and stigmatizing popular beliefs about schizophrenia, but little is known about media images corresponding to these beliefs. Building on Susan Sontag's exploration of cancer in the 1978 book Illness as Metaphor, the authors hypothesize that "schizophrenia" is now more commonly misused. A total of 1740 newspaper ar...
Article
Archival data from 17,929 homeless adults entering the Veterans Health Administration's Healthcare for Homeless Veterans program were analyzed to identify whether the rate of referral and admission to vocational rehabilitation differed between adults with psychiatric disorders alone and those with psychiatric disorders with a coexisting substance-u...
Article
Full-text available
The authors tested the hypotheses that neuropsychological functioning would improve after homeless persons with severe and persistent mental illness were provided with housing and that executive functioning would improve more among those placed in group homes than among those placed in independent apartments. A total of 114 persons with serious and...
Article
The Veterans Construction Team (VCT) is an innovative form of Compensated Work Therapy (CWT) for unemployed, homeless veterans who have had a history of substance abuse and/or a serious mental or medical illness. The VCT model builds social support and self-esteem, while delivering tangible services to public entities and providing a relatively hig...
Article
Case management is a technology for enhancing the continuity of care provided to clients in a community-based mental health service system. From among diverse case management models, the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health adopted the service broker model for statewide implementation and identified changes in the structure of inter-occupation...
Article
Prior research indicates that homeless consumers of mental health services have a marked preference for independent living, while clinicians tend to recommend staffed, group housing. In order to understand this divergence and identify its consequences for mental health policy, we test influences on housing preferences suggested by rational choice a...
Article
Full-text available
The study examined the influence of group or individual housing placement and consumer characteristics on the number of days subsequently homeless among formerly homeless mentally ill persons. A total of 303 homeless shelter residents with severe mental illness were screened for dangerousness, 118 were randomly assigned to either independent apartm...