Russell Mannion

Russell Mannion
University of Birmingham · Health Services Management Centre (HSMC)

PhD (Manchester)

About

234
Publications
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Publications

Publications (234)
Article
Purpose This study aims to explore how leadership, management practices and organisational cultures have changed in low and high-performing mental health (MH) providers between 2015 and 2020 in the English National Health Service. Design/methodology/approach The authors used a qualitative case study design comprising a purposeful sample of two low...
Article
Full-text available
Objective To explore how mental health trusts in England adapted and responded to the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, with the aim of identifying lessons that can be learned during and beyond the pandemic. Methods Following a scoping study, we undertook 52 semi-structured interviews with senior managers, clinicians, patient representati...
Article
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Background The introduction of ‘Freedom to Speak Up Guardians’ into every NHS trust in England was intended to support workers and trusts to better raise, respond to and learn from speaking-up concerns. However, only broad guidance was provided on how to implement the role. As a result, there is the potential for important local differences to emer...
Article
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Introduction Unprofessional behaviours encompass many behaviours including bullying, harassment and microaggressions. These behaviours between healthcare staff are problematic; they affect people's ability to work, to feel psychologically safe at work and speak up and to deliver safe care to patients. Almost a fifth of UK National Health Service s...
Article
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Background In 2021, during the COVID-19 pandemic, England’s Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) released a White Paper outlining proposed legislative reform of the National Health Service (NHS). Key to the proposals is the shift from relationships between providers based on competition, to cooperation, as the central driver of improved perf...
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Background Inter-organisational collaborations (IOCs) in healthcare have been viewed as an effective approach to performance improvement. However, there remain gaps in our understanding of what helps IOCs function, as well as how and why contextual elements affect their implementation. A realist review of evidence drawing on 86 sources has sought t...
Preprint
BACKGROUND In England, as elsewhere, COVID-19 has significantly affected mental health care and tested the resilience of providers. In many areas, the increased use of information and digital technology has enabled traditional modes of service delivery to be supported or even replaced by remote forms of provision. OBJECTIVE We assessed the use and...
Article
Background Although under-resourcing of healthcare facilities and high workload is known to undermine patient safety, there is a dearth of evidence about how these factors affect employee voice and silence about unsafe care. We address this gap in the literature by exploring how resource constraints and high workload influence the willingness of st...
Article
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Background The commitment of hospital managers plays a key role in decisions regarding investments in quality improvement (QI) and the implementation of quality improvement systems (QIS). With regard to the concept of social capital, successful cooperation and coordination among hospital management board members is strongly influenced by commonly s...
Chapter
In this chapter, Speed and Mannion develop understandings of the genesis of populist health policies and their impact on professional practice. In a case study drawn from the 2015/2016 excess weekend mortality controversy in the UK, they consider how various political actors utilised a populist political frame to structure the debate, and the influ...
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Purpose Healthcare systems are under pressure to improve their performance, while at the same time facing severe resource constraints, particularly workforce shortages. By applying resource-dependency-theory (RDT), we explore how healthcare organizations in different settings perceive pressure arising from uncertain access to resources and examine...
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Background NHS England’s 7-day services policy comprised 10 standards to improve access to quality health care across all days of the week. Six standards targeted hospital specialists on the assumption that their absence caused the higher mortality associated with weekend hospital admission: the ‘weekend effect’. The High-intensity Specialist-Led A...
Article
It has been recognized that whistleblowing is important to detect failings in many sectors within many nations. Many serious failings in the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) are brought to light by the action of whistleblowers. However, analysis of the reports of public inquiries reveal how little the inquiries examined the role of the whistleblo...
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Background Inter-organisational collaboration is increasingly prominent within contemporary healthcare systems. A range of collaboration types such as alliances, networks, and mergers have been proposed as a means to turnaround organisations, by reducing duplication of effort, enabling resource sharing, and promoting innovations. However, in practi...
Article
Full-text available
Background National standards are commonly used as an improvement strategy in healthcare, but organisations may respond in diverse and sometimes negative ways to external quality demands. This paper describes how a sample of NHS hospital trusts in England responded to the introduction of national standards for 7-day services (7DS), from an organisa...
Article
The decommissioning of a health‐care service is invariably a highly complex and contentious process which faces many implementation challenges. There has been little specific theorisation of this phenomena, although insights can be transferred from wider literatures on policy implementation and change processes. In this paper, we present findings f...
Article
Background Healthcare systems worldwide increasingly value the contribution of employee voice in ensuring the quality of patient care. Although employees’ concerns are often dealt with satisfactorily, considerable evidence suggests that some employees may feel unable to speak-up, and even when they do their concerns may be ignored. As a result, in...
Article
Purpose This paper aims to explore right wing populist government responses to the coronavirus pandemic. Design/methodology/approach This paper is a narrative overview of right-wing populist policies and strategies, which is loosely structured around fascistic themes set out in Albert Camus’ allegorical novel, The Plague . Findings Although indiv...
Article
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Background: Developing and strengthening the competencies and skills of health care managers is a key objective in many health systems. Selecting adequate training methods, content, and using appropriate criteria for assessing their impact is fundamental for improving their usefulness and effectiveness. Filling an important gap in knowledge, this...
Article
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Background In 2013, the English National Health Service launched the policy of 7-day services to improve care quality and outcomes for weekend emergency admissions. Aims To determine whether the quality of care of emergency medical admissions is worse at weekends, and whether this has changed during implementation of 7-day services. Methods Using...
Article
Purpose The NHS is facing unprecedented financial strain. These significant economic pressures have coincided with concerns regarding the quality and safety of the NHS provider sector. To make the necessary improvements to performance, policy interest has turned to encouraging greater collaboration and partnership working across providers. Methods...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background National standards are commonly used as an improvement strategy in healthcare, but organisations may respond in diverse and sometimes negative ways to external quality demands. This paper describes how a sample of NHS hospital trusts in England responded to the introduction of national standards for 7-day service (7DS), from an organisat...
Article
Full-text available
Background Inter-organisational collaboration is increasingly prominent within contemporary healthcare systems. A range of collaboration types such as alliances, networks, and mergers have been proposed as a means to turnaround organisations, by reducing duplication of effort, and enabling resource sharing, greater influence, and novel innovations...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Inter-organisational collaboration is increasingly prominent within contemporary healthcare systems. A range of collaboration types such as alliances, networks, and mergers have been proposed as a means to turnaround organisations, by reducing duplication of effort, enabling resource sharing, and promoting innovations. However, in practi...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past decade, some of the world's most stable parliamentary democracies have witnessed a revival in right‐wing populist political parties, movements and leaders. Although there is a growing body of theoretical and empirical literature documenting the rise of populism, there has been very little exploration of the implications for health pol...
Article
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Background Bias in the publication and reporting of research findings (referred to as publication and related bias here) poses a major threat in evidence synthesis and evidence-based decision-making. Although this bias has been well documented in clinical research, little is known about its occurrence and magnitude in health services and delivery r...
Chapter
Full-text available
Inter-organisational partnerships such as mergers and buddying are being promoted as a way to improve the performance of hospital and community services in the English NHS. The purpose of this chapter is to critically reflect on such approaches to public sector improvement with a decentred analysis of three inter-organisational collaborations acros...
Article
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Background: Publication and related biases (including publication bias, time-lag bias, outcome reporting bias and p-hacking) have been well documented in clinical research, but relatively little is known about their presence and extent in health services research (HSR). This paper aims to systematically review evidence concerning publication and r...
Article
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Background: Determining the optimal number of hospital beds is a complex and challenging endeavor and requires models and techniques which are sensitive to the multi-level, uncertain, and dynamic variables involved. This study identifies and characterizes extant models and methods that can be used to determine the required number of beds at hospit...
Article
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Purpose Attempts to transform health systems have in many countries involved starting to pay healthcare providers through a DRG system, but that has involved managerial workarounds. Managerial workarounds have seldom been analysed. This paper does so by extending and modifying existing knowledge of the causes and character of clinical and IT workar...
Article
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Objectives: While the presence of publication bias in clinical research is well documented, little is known about its role in the reporting of health services research. This paper explores stakeholder perceptions and experiences with regard to the role of publication and related biases in quantitative research relating to the quality, accessibilit...
Article
Full-text available
Strategies to identify and mitigate publication bias and outcome reporting bias are frequently adopted in systematic reviews of clinical interventions but it is not clear how often these are applied in systematic reviews relating to quantitative health services and delivery research (HSDR). We examined whether these biases are mentioned and/or othe...
Chapter
Healthcare organisations reap significant benefits when workers’ concerns are adequately listened and responded to, including improved patient safety, reduced costs and improved staff experience. Although many concerns are dealt with satisfactorily, compelling evidence suggests that problems of silence (where employees do not speak up) and deafness...
Article
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Variation persists in the quality of board-level leadership of hospitals. The consequences of poor leadership can be catastrophic for patients. The year 2019 marks 50 years of public inquiries into healthcare failures in the UK. The aim of this article is to enhance our understanding of context-specific effectiveness of healthcare board practices,...
Article
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New wave public health places an emphasis on exhorting individuals to engage in healthy behaviour with good health being a signifier of virtuous moral standing, whereas poor health is often associated with personal moral failings. In effect, the medical is increasingly being collapsed into the moral. This approach is consistent with other aspects o...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to review existing research on whistleblowing in healthcare in order to develop an evidence base for policy and research. Design/methodology/approach A narrative review, based on systematic literature protocols developed within the management field. Findings The authors identify valuable insights on the factor...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background Publication bias has been demonstrated in several high-profile cases associated with clinical trials of pharmaceuticals, but empirical evidence on this bias is scarce in HSDR, which concerns research to produce evidence on the quality, accessibility and organisation of health services. We set out to gauge the existence and scale of publi...
Article
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Purpose Neo-liberal “reform” has in many countries shifted services across the boundary between the public and private sector. This policy re-opens the question of what structural and managerial differences, if any, differences of ownership make to healthcare providers. The purpose of this paper is to examine the connections between ownership, orga...
Article
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Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore whether official inquiries are an effective method for holding the medical profession to account for failings in the quality and safety of care. Design/methodology/approach: Through a review of the theoretical literature on professions and documentary analysis of key public inquiry documents and r...
Article
Most research on health systems examines contemporary problems within one, or at most a few, countries. Breaking with this tradition, we present a series of case studies in a book written by key policymakers, scholars and experts, looking at health systems and their projected successes to 2030. Healthcare Systems: Future Predictions for Global Care...
Article
This abstract summarises a paper presented to the European Public Health Conference, Slovenia, November 2018, which is based on Pavolini, E., Kuhlmann, E., et al, Health Policy, 2018, 122 (10), 1140-1148; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168851018304494?dgcid=rss_sd_all
Article
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NHS Foundation Trust (FT) Hospitals in England have complex internal governance arrangements. They may be considered to exhibit meta-regulatory characteristics to the extent that Governors are able to promote deliberative values and steer internal governance processes towards wider regulatory goals. Yet, while recent studies of NHS FT Hospital gove...
Article
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Background: In the context of serious concerns over the affordability of healthcare, various authors and international policy bodies advise that strategic purchasing is a key means of improving health system performance. Such advice is typically informed by theories from the economics of organization (EOO). This paper proposes that these theories a...
Article
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthpol.2018.08.020 A new wave of support for populist parties and movements represents a serious threat to universal healthcare coverage in traditional liberal democracies and beyond. This article aims to contribute empirical material on the relationships between healthcare governance, professions and populism. It appl...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background Publication bias is a major threat to the validity of systematic reviews (SRs). Strategies to identify and reduce publication bias are routinely incorporated into SRs of clinical interventions, but the level of adoption of these strategies in SRs relating to health services and delivery research (HSDR) is unclear. The objectives of this...
Chapter
In modern healthcare systems, not all care is as good or as safe as it could be and there is growing evidence to suggest about one in ten patients admitted to hospital may be harmed as a result of their admission. This chapter draws on some recent work funded by the UK National Institute for Health Research to explore the ways in which front-line v...
Article
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Background There is compelling evidence to suggest that some (or even many) NHS staff feel unable to speak up, and that even when they do, their organisation may respond inappropriately. Objectives The specific project objectives were (1) to explore the academic and grey literature on whistleblowing and related concepts, identifying the key theore...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: The mortality associated with weekend admission to hospital (the 'weekend effect') has for many years been attributed to deficiencies in quality of hospital care, often assumed to be due to suboptimal senior medical staffing at weekends. This protocol describes a case note review to determine whether there are differences in care qua...
Article
Full-text available
In the context of an austere financial climate, local health care budget holders are increasingly expected to make and enact decisions to decommission (reduce or stop providing) services. However, little is currently known about the experiences of those seeking to decommission. This paper presents the first national study of decommissioning in the...
Article
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Healthcare reform typically involves orchestrating a policy change, mediated through some form of operational, systems, financial, process or practice intervention. The aim is to improve the ways in which care is delivered to patients. In our book 'Health Systems Improvement Across the Globe: Success Stories from 60 Countries', we gathered case-stu...
Article
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In response to a weight of evidence that patients are frequently harmed as a result of their care, there have been concerted efforts to make healthcare safer, with health systems across the globe investing significant resources in policies and programmes designed to reduce adverse events. Yet, despite extensive efforts, improvements in safety have...
Article
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Public boards of directors face challenges in demonstrating effectiveness and return on investment. Health care boards in particular operate in a high risk service and political environment, where both patient safety and financial sustainability are paramount. The motivation in this article is to make sense of the conflicting and competing theories...
Chapter
Hospital Trust Boards in the English NHS have statutory responsibility for upholding quality and safety of care in their organisation. Recent high- profile reports into serious failings in standards, most notably at Mid- Staffordshire NHS Trust, raise concerns over the ability of Trust Boards to discharge these oversight duties effectively (Francis...