Ruqaiijah Yearby

Ruqaiijah Yearby
The Ohio State University | OSU · Moritz College of Law

JD, MPH

About

39
Publications
4,383
Reads
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474
Citations
Citations since 2016
24 Research Items
452 Citations
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Introduction
My current project focuses on employment discrimination and its impact on health outcomes for women. My work will discuss how current health care laws and funding mechanisms harm women because they ignore the continuation of employment discrimination, which negatively impacts women's health status. For example, I am working on how historical employment laws and those passed in response to COVID-19 are impacting the health and well-being of essential workers during COVID-19 pandemic.
Additional affiliations
July 2018 - present
Saint Louis University
Position
  • Professor (Full)
March 2017 - June 2018
Case Western Reserve University
Position
  • Chair
Description
  • Chair
July 2011 - November 2015
Case Western Reserve University
Position
  • Managing Director
Education
July 1997 - May 2000
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Field of study
  • Health Policy and Management
August 1996 - May 2000
Georgetown University
Field of study
  • Law
August 1992 - August 1996
University of Michigan
Field of study
  • Honors Biology

Publications

Publications (39)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background Crisis Standards of Care (CSC) ventilator triage guidance often includes prediction models such as the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (SOFA) to assess patients’ lCU survival. However, from Spring 2020, a number of publications and robust studies demonstrated inequitable outcomes across racial groups from using SOFA. For exampl...
Chapter
Taking inspiration from Public Enemy's lead vocalist Chuck D - who once declared that 'rap is the CNN of young Black America' - this volume brings together leading legal commentators to make sense of some of the most pressing law and policy issues in the context of hip-hop music and the ongoing struggle for Black equality. Contributors include MSNB...
Article
The COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated and amplified the harsh reality of health inequities experienced by racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States. Members of these groups have disproportionately been infected and died from COVID-19, yet they still lack equitable access to treatment and vaccines. Lack of equitable access to high-quali...
Article
Covid-19 raised many novel ethical issues including regarding the allocation of opportunities to participate in clinical trials during a public health emergency. In this article, we explore how hospitals that have a scarcity of trial opportunities, either overall or in a specific trial, can equitably allocate those opportunities in the context of a...
Article
Long-term services and supports for older persons in the United States are provided in a complex, racially segregated system, with striking racial disparities in access, process, and outcomes of care for residents, which have been magnified during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 pandemic. These disparities are in large measure the result of longstandi...
Article
Full-text available
The genome between socially constructed racial groups is 99.5%–99.9% identical; the 0.1%–0.5% variation between any two unrelated individuals is greatest between individuals in the same racial group; and there are no identifiable racial genomic clusters. Nevertheless, race continues to be used as a biological reality in health disparities research,...
Article
The government recognizes that social factors cause racial inequalities in access to resources and opportunities that result in racial health disparities. However, this recognition fails to acknowledge the root cause of these racial inequalities: structural racism. As a result, racial health disparities persist.
Article
Full-text available
Racial and ethnic minorities have always been the most impacted by pandemics because of: disparities in exposure to the virus; disparities in susceptibility to contracting the virus; and disparities in treatment. This article explains how structural racism, the ways in which laws are used to advantage the majority and disadvantage racial and ethnic...
Article
Full-text available
Workers, who are being asked to risk their health by working outside their homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, need adequate hazard compensation, safe workplace conditions, and personal protective equipment (PPE). Sadly, this is not happening for many essential workers, such as those working in home health care and in the meat processing industry....
Article
Full-text available
Past infectious disease epidemics in the United States and governmental responses to them made it highly predictable that people living in poverty, people of color, and people with disabilities would bear the brunt of the coronavirus pandemic due to discrimination that limits equal access to resources, such as health care, housing, and employment....
Article
The Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) benefit is a key component of Medicaid policy intended to define an essential set of services provided to patients younger than age 21. Given increasing attention to social determinants of health in pediatric health care, this qualitative review examines the extent to which EPSDT m...
Article
Full-text available
As advocates from the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements work to end sexual harassment and unequal pay in employment, they must not ignore the unique problems women of color face. As noted in Kimberle Crenshaw's theory of intersectionality, women of color face gender and racial bias in employment, thus eradicating gender bias will not make women of colo...
Article
Women are making inroads into the upper echelons of academia, business, and entertainment, yet pay inequities persist. Advocates fighting for women’s equal pay should consider the effect that unequal pay has on women’s health status, especially on the health of women of color, who tend to have greater health disparities than other women.1,2 Researc...
Article
During the Jim Crow era of 1877 to 1954, the federal government sponsored and supported the racially separate and unequal distribution of resources, including, but not limited to, education, housing, employment, and healthcare. On May 14, 1954, the Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that separate and unequal education violated the C...
Article
Full-text available
American bioethics has served as a safety net for the rich and powerful, often failing to protect minorities and the economically disadvantaged. For example, minorities and the economically disadvantaged are often unduly influenced into participating in clinical trials that promise monetary gain or access to health care. This is a violation of the...
Article
The history of pediatric medical research has been characterized as a history of child abuse. Usually, the debate regarding the use of children in medical research has centered on questions of Autonomy (informed consent) and Beneficence (the best interest of the child based on a benefit risk analysis). The debate has rarely focused on the question...
Article
Full-text available
The election of President Obama prompted many Americans to declare that the United States had entered into a ‘post-racial’ era in which racial bias no longer existed and African-Americans are treated equally. However, racial bias did not cease before or after the election of an African-American president. In fact, empirical evidence shows that Afri...
Article
Full-text available
Point (Overview): Interpersonal and institutional racial biases are the principal reasons for racial disparities in accessing health care and disparities in African Americans’ health status, which can only be addressed by acknowledging and putting an end to interpersonal and institutional racial bias in the health care system that adversely affects...
Article
Full-text available
On February 25, 2007, a twelve-year-old African American boy named Deamonte Driver died of a toothache because he never received a routine $80 tooth extraction that may have saved him, which was covered by his insurer: Medicaid. Unable to afford $80 or find a dentist that took Medicaid, Deamonte wound up in the emergency room, underwent two brain s...
Article
Full-text available
Bennie Saxon had dementia. Because his family could not care for him at home, he was placed at Alden Wentworth Rehabilitation and Health Care Center (“Alden Wentworth”), a predominately African American nursing home in Chicago, Illinois. On May 4, 2009, he fell four stories to his death. The Cook County Office of the Medical Examiner ruled Mr. Saxo...
Article
Full-text available
Using a public health policy perspective, this article examines the persistence of racial inequities in nursing homes and prescribes a solution to address these inequities. I use empirical data to prove the persistence of racial inequities in health care, analyze the government policies that allow racial inequities to continue, and provide a soluti...
Article
Full-text available
A plethora of empirical studies, such as the Institute of Medicine’s Unequal Treatment report, have shown that racial inequities in health care continue at the same level as in the Jim Crow Era. Innumerable reasons have been offered to explain the continuation of these health inequities, including racial discrimination. Congress enacted Title VI of...
Article
Full-text available
The Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment has been perverted in the federal administrative system. For example, federal agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), regularly deprive individuals of liberty and property with little to no review. In its regulation of the health care industry through the Medicare progr...
Article
Full-text available
Legal and medical experts have noted continued racism in the health care system that prevents the equal distribution of quality care. Initially most racism was intentional and expressed through de jure segregation, as evidenced by federal funding of the construction of racial segregated health care facilities. Now most racism, expressed through de...
Article
Traditionally, American bioethics has served as a safety net for the rich and powerful, for they are not forced to act as research subjects to obtain access to general health care for themselves or their children. However, American bioethics has failed to protect the vulnerable, i.e. indigent minorities. The vulnerable are not treated the same as t...
Article
Full-text available
Kelley Mitchell, a 75-year-old woman, lives alone in Lincoln Park, an affluent neighborhood in a major city in the Midwest. One day while rushing to the telephone, she slips and falls down the stairs and is immediately raced to the hospital in her neighborhood. Diagnosed with a hip fracture, she recuperates in the hospital for several weeks. Her co...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Using empirical data, her research explores the ways in structural discrimination and which gaps in the language and enforcement of labor and employment laws results in health disparities for women and racial and ethnic minorities, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic.