Rui Rosa

Rui Rosa
University of Lisbon | UL · MARE-Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre

Ph.D.

About

285
Publications
92,949
Reads
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6,637
Citations
Citations since 2016
150 Research Items
4807 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - November 2019
University of Lisbon
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2008 - present
University of Lisbon
Position
  • Investigador Principal - Senior Researcher
Description
  • FCUL, Laboratório Marítimo da Guia
January 2008 - December 2009
University of Rhode Island
Education
June 2000 - June 2005
University of Lisbon
Field of study
  • Marine Biology

Publications

Publications (285)
Article
Full-text available
The acceleration of global warming and increased vulnerability of marine social-ecological systems affect the benefits provided by the ocean. Spatial planning of marine areas is vital to balance multiple human demands and ensure a healthy ocean, while supporting global ocean goals. To thrive in a changing ocean though, marine spatial planning (MSP)...
Article
Full-text available
The ongoing digital revolution in the age of big data is opening new research opportunities. Culturomics and iEcology, two emerging research areas based on the analysis of online data resources, can provide novel scientific insights and inform conservation and management efforts. To date, culturomics and iEcology have been applied primarily in the...
Article
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Over the past decades, three major challenges to marine life have emerged as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions: ocean warming, acidification and oxygen loss. While most experimental research has targeted the first two stressors, the last remains comparatively neglected. Here, we implemented sequential hierarchical mixed-model meta-analyses (...
Article
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Climate-driven expansions of ocean hypoxic zones are predicted to concentrate pelagic fish in oxygenated surface layers, but how expanding hypoxia and fisheries will interact to affect threatened pelagic sharks remains unknown. Here, analysis of satellite-tracked blue sharks and environmental modelling in the eastern tropical Atlantic oxygen minimu...
Article
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The use of cephalopod beaks in ecological and population dynamics studies has allowed major advances of our knowledge on the role of cephalopods in marine ecosystems in the last 60 years. Since the 1960’s, with the pioneering research by Malcolm Clarke and colleagues, cephalopod beaks (also named jaws or mandibles) have been described to species le...
Article
Rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are driving ocean warming and acidification, which may negatively affect the nutritional quality and physiological performance of commercially important fish species. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of ocean acidification (OA; ΔpH = −0.3 units equivalent to ΔpCO2 ~ +600 μatm) and warm...
Article
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Toxin-producing microalgae present a significant environmental risk for ecosystems and human societies when they reach concentrations that affect other aquatic organisms or human health. Harmful algal blooms (HAB) have been linked to mass wildlife die-offs and human food poisoning episodes, and climate change has the potential to alter the frequenc...
Article
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Ocean warming and acidification have been shown to elicit deleterious effects on cephalopod mollusks, especially during early ontogeny, albeit effects on behavior remain largely unexplored. This study aimed to evaluate, for the first time, the effect of end-of-the-century projected levels of ocean warming (W; + 3 °C) and acidification (A; 980 µatm...
Article
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Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin naturally occurring in terrestrial and marine organisms such as pufferfish. Due to the risk of TTX poisoning, fish of Tetraodontidae family and other puffer-related species must not be placed in the EU markets. This restriction applies to fish of the family Molidae even though no data on toxins’ occurrence...
Article
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Global ocean O2 content has varied significantly across the eons, both shaping and being shaped by the evolutionary history of life on planet Earth. Indeed, past O2 fluctuations have been associated with major extinctions and the reorganization of marine biota. Moreover, its most recent iteration—now anthropogenically driven—represents one of the m...
Article
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Animals with fission–fusion dynamics live in fluid societies with varying party sizes. The joining (fusion) and separation (fission) of these parties is considered a response to costs and benefits associated with grouping. This study investigates which factors influence grouping and fission–fusion dynamics in common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) in...
Article
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A mechanistic model based on Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory was developed to predict the combined effects of ocean warming, acidification and decreased food availability on growth and reproduction of three commercially important marine fish species: white seabream (Diplodus sargus), zebra seabream (Diplodus cervinus) and Senegalese sole (Solea...
Article
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The global oxygen (O2) content in oceans is decreasing due to climatic changes since it is associated with temperature-driven declines in oxygen solubility, strengthened stratification of seawater masses, increased biological oxygen consumption and coastal eutrophication. More studies are required to focus onnocturnal hypoxia. The resilience of cor...
Article
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Cleaning symbioses are key mutualistic interactions where cleaners remove ectoparasites and tissues from client fishes. Such interactions elicit beneficial effects on clients’ ecophysiology, with cascading effects on fish diversity and abundance. Ocean acidification (OA), resulting from increasing CO 2 concentrations, can affect the behavior of cle...
Article
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Fisheries ecosystem-based management is an important tool for sustainable harvesting of fisheries worldwide. Knowledge of trophic interactions is crucial as changes in trophic balances can induce severe changes in the structure of marine communities. While advocated for deep-sea fisheries, a lack of studies in benthopelagic area persist. The Antarc...
Article
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Coral reef fish exhibit a large variety of behaviours crucial for fitness and survival. The cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus displays cognitive abilities during interspecific interactions by providing services of ectoparasite cleaning, thus serving as a good example to understand the processes of complex social behaviour. However, little is know...
Article
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Coastal seagrass meadows provide a variety of essential ecological and economic services, in-cluding nursery grounds, sediment stabilization, nutrient cycling, coastal protection, and blue carbon sequestration. However, these ecosystems are highly threatened by ongoing climatic change. This study aimed to understand how the dwarf eelgrass Zostera n...
Poster
Cephalopods are abundant predator mollusks in the ocean, with squids being the most prominent in human consumption. In the last sixty years, commercial cephalopod populations have increased and expanded poleward, due to their high flexibility. However, physiological and modelling studies have shown impairments and declines for these animals in futu...
Article
In recent years, validation of seafood authenticity and provenance has attracted the attention of authorities and consumers. Increasing levels of food fraud has raised awareness regarding seafood traceability, especially in highly valuable and highly consumed seafood products, such as the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris). Seafood traceability stud...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal marine ecosystems are currently being exposed to climate change at a much faster rate than many other ecosystems, with coastal species being exposed to multiple stressors. Cephalopod mollusks play a pivotal role in marine trophic webs, and most are “keystone” species due to their influence on ecosystem dynamics. In this study, we characteri...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the long evolutionary history of this group, the challenges brought by the Anthropocene have been inflicting an extensive pressure over sharks and their relatives. Overexploitation has been driving a worldwide decline in elasmobranch populations, and rapid environmental change, triggered by anthropogenic activities, may further test this gr...
Article
Full-text available
Dietary descriptions based on stomach content are pervasive regardless of the biases concerning its methodology, statistics and descriptors. We here review different biases on the stomach content analysis, sample size, and indices used for cephalopods. These mollusks are key components in marine food webs and most are characterized as active predat...
Article
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Stable isotope compositions of carbon and nitrogen (expressed as δ ¹³ C and δ ¹⁵ N) from the European common cuttlefish ( Sepia officinalis ) were measured in order to evaluate the utility of using these natural tracers throughout the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea (NEAO-MS). Mantle tissue was obtained from S. officinalis collected...
Article
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Reproductive fitness is defined by the successful passing of an individual’s genes to the next generation. Cephalopods that mate in groups, in particular coastal squid and cuttlefish species, have evolved complex sexual tactics in order to maximize reproductive success (Morse and Huffard 2019). Through dynamic skin patterning accompanied by typical...
Article
Dwarf eelgrass Zostera noltii meadows are found in estuarine coastal areas across the north-eastern Atlantic, where they provide key ecosystem services, including nursery grounds, sediment stabilization, nutrient cycling and carbon sequestration. These blue carbon ecosystems are being subjected to several anthropogenic pressures, including climate...
Article
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Coastal areas host some of the planet’s most productive ecosystems, providing life-sustaining ecological services and several benefits to humankind, while also being some of the most threatened areas (e.g. by globalization, climate change, and biological invasion). Salt marshes are coastal habitats with a key role in food and shelter provisioning,...
Article
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In the pelagic environment diel vertical movements (DVM) are widespread across taxa, from zooplankton ascending from day-time depths into surface layers at night to avoid visual predators, to apex predators following prey movements to maximise foraging opportunities. The drivers of DVM in large predators such as pelagic sharks have only recently be...
Preprint
Full-text available
Coral reef fish exhibit a large variety of behaviours crucial for fitness and survival. The cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus displays cognitive abilities during interspecific interactions by providing services of ectoparasite cleaning, thus serving as a good model to understand the processes of complex social behaviour. However, little is known...
Article
Full-text available
Cephalopods are an important component of Southern Ocean food webs but studies analysing their habitat and trophic ecology are scarce. Here, we use the Antarctic toothfish Dissostichus mawsoni as a biological sampler of the Southern Ocean's cephalopods in the Ross, Amundsen, and D'Urville Seas. Ten cephalopod taxa were identified in the diet of the...
Article
The available data on trace elements (TE) of deep-sea organisms is scarce and nonexistent for rare earth elements (REE). Hence, this study characterizes REE and TE in five porifera genera (Jaspis, Geodia, Hamacantha, Leiodermatium, Poliopogon) collected in deep-sea areas (between 481 and 2656 m) of the North Atlantic. Aluminium was the most common...
Article
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Gnathiid isopods, common fish ectoparasites, can affect fish physiology, behaviour and survival. Gnathiid juveniles emerge from the benthos to feed on fish blood. In the Caribbean, gnathiids are positively associated with dead coral and negatively associated with live coral, due to coral predation on gnathiids. However, such interactions were unstu...
Article
The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) has attracted scientific inquiry for centuries due to its singular biological traits. Within the European Union, glass eel fisheries have declined sharply since 1980, from up to 2000 t (t) to 62.2 t in 2018, placing wild populations under higher risk of extinction. Among the major causes of glass eels collapse,...
Article
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Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), or drones, have recently emerged as a relatively affordable and accessible method for studying wildlife. Vertical Take-off and Landing (VTOL) UAVs are appropriate for morphometric, behavioural, abundance and demographic studies of marine mammals, providing a stable, nonintrusive and highly manoeuvrable platform. Pre...
Article
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Learning can occur through self-experience with the environment, or through the observation of others. The latter allows for adaptive behaviour without trial-and-error, thus maximizing individual fitness. Perhaps given their mostly solitary lifestyle, cuttlefish have seldomly been tested under observational learning scenarios. Here we used a multi-...
Article
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Cooperation is ubiquitous in nature, and occurs at all levels of biological complexity, providing immediate direct benefits and/or future indirect benefits to participating partners (Lehmann and Keller 2006, Bshary and Bergmüller 2008).
Article
Trace elements are potentially critical contaminants of aquatic environments and fish, occupying upper trophic levels, are especially vulnerable to bioaccumulation. Due to public health concerns, however, data on the elemental composition of non-commercially important marine species are particularly lacking. Ocean sunfish (Mola spp.) attain a low c...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification is a consequence of chemical changes driven mainly by a continuous uptake of carbon dioxide, resulting in pH decrease. This phenomenon represents an additional threat to marine life, with expected effects ranging from changes in behavioral responses and calcification rates to the potential promotion of oxidative stress. To unrav...
Article
Full-text available
Off mainland Portugal, the common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) is the most sighted cetacean, although information on this species is limited. The Atlantic coast of Southern Portugal is characterized by an intense wind-driven upwelling, creating ideal conditions for common dolphins. Using data collected aboard whale-watching boats (1929 sightings and...
Article
Full-text available
Natural markers (δ13C and δ18O stable isotopes) in the cuttlebones of the European common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) were determined for individuals collected across a substantial portion of their range in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean (NEAO) and Mediterranean Sea. Cuttlebone δ13C and δ18O were quantified for core and edge material to characteri...
Article
As Earth’s temperature continues to rise, sudden warming events, designated as marine heatwaves (MHWs), are becoming more frequent and longer. This phenomenon is already shown to significantly impact marine ecosystems and respective fauna. While experimental acclimation to higher temperatures is known to affect predatory behavior, metabolism and ov...
Article
Full-text available
Carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere is expected to continue rising by 2100, leading to a decrease in ocean pH in a process known as ocean acidification (OA). OA can have a direct impact on calcifying organisms, including on the cuttlebone of the common cuttlefish Sepia officinalis. Moreover, nutritional status has also been shown to affe...
Article
Full-text available
The consequences of human influence can arise in vertebrates as primary, secondary, or even tertiary stressors and may be especially detrimental for slow growing species with long generation times (i.e., K-selected species). Here, we review the impacts of both direct and indirect human interactions on the reproductive biology of elasmobranchs. With...
Article
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An array of anthropogenic pressures is affecting tropical ecosystems, posing major conservation challenges for scientists, stakeholders and populations. Illegal cyanide fishing is one of the major threats to Indo-Pacific coral reefs, targeting a multitude of colorful species for the marine aquarium trade as well as large-sized groupers and wrasses...
Article
Full-text available
Mercury (Hg) is globally recognized as a persistent chemical contaminant that accumulates in marine biota, thus constituting an ecological hazard, as well as a health risk to seafood consumers. Climate change-related stressors may influence the bioaccumulation, detoxification, and toxicity of chemical contaminants, such as Hg. Yet, the potential in...
Article
Fish are frequently exposed to harmful algal blooms (HAB) and to related toxins. However, the biological effects of okadaic acid (OA), the most abundant and frequent HAB-toxin in Europe, South America and Asia, have been poorly investigated. In this study, fish swimming performance and metabolic rates were investigated in juveniles of Zebra seabrea...
Article
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Myctophids are key members of mesopelagic communities with a world biomass estimated at 600 million tons. They play a central role in oceanic food webs and are known to perform diel vertical migrations, crossing the thermocline and reaching the oxygen minimum zone, however, very scarce information exists on trace element content in these organisms....
Article
Full-text available
The juveniles of gnathiid isopods are one of the most common fish ectoparasites in marine habitats and cause deleterious effects on fish by feeding on host blood and lymph. Reef fishes tend to engage in cooperative interactions with cleaning organisms to reduce their ectoparasite load. Ocean acidification (OA) pose multiple threats to marine life....
Article
Full-text available
The vulnerability of early fish stages represents a critical bottleneck for fish recruitment; therefore, it is essential to understand how climate change affects their physiology for more sustainable management of fisheries. Here, we investigated the effects of warming (OW; +4 °C) and acidification (OA; ΔpH = 0.5) on the heart and oxygen consumptio...
Article
Recent studies have shown that coastal and shelf cephalopod populations have increased globally over the last six decades. Although cephalopod landings are dominated by the squid fishery, which represents nearly 80% of the worldwide cephalopod catches, octopuses and cuttlefishes represent ∼10% each. Total reported global production of octopuses ove...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies have shown that coastal and shelf cephalopod populations have increased globally over the last six decades. Although cephalopod landings are dominated by the squid fishery, which represents nearly 80% of the worldwide cephalopod catches, octopuses and cuttlefishes represent ∼10% each. Total reported global production of octopuses ove...